SCOTT STALEY: FORD CHIEF ENGINEER REVVED UP BY ELECTRIC VEHICLES

SCOTT STALEY: FORD CHIEF ENGINEER REVVED UP BY ELECTRIC VEHICLES


Scott Staley, chief engineer, electrification research
Click here to download related images.
  • Scott Staley, chief engineer of electrification research, is currently working on Ford’s development of electrified vehicles
  • Staley previously led development of the advanced powertrains for Ford’s fuel cell electric vehicle programs
  • Outside of work, Staley is learning to speak Icelandic, having become fascinated with the country and its culture after speaking at its universities about Ford’s fuel cell vehicle research
Scott Staley, chief engineer of electrification research, left a university professorship 20 years ago to work on “cutting-edge projects” at Ford Motor Company’s research laboratories. He hasn’t been disappointed.
 
Initially, Staley focused on research and development of computer-aided design and engineering methods targeted at accelerating Ford’s global product development processes. Eventually, the self-described “zero-emissions car guy” gravitated to advanced powertrains and became chief engineer for Ford’s research activities on hybrid and hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle development in North America. The experience has proven invaluable in his current role on the Ford Transit Connect Electric program.
 
Ford was one of the first automakers to launch a fleet of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles in 2005, after unveiling a prototype in late 2003. From 2005 to 2009, Ford’s fleet of fuel cell vehicles exceeded expectations of the company’s hydrogen research engineers by accumulating more than 1.3 million miles of operation without significant maintenance issues. The test vehicles also have earned accolades from Ford’s global fleet partners for outstanding durability, reliability and capability.
 
Staley’s experience on Ford’s advanced powertrain programs helped the Transit Connect Electric team hit the ground running in late 2009, getting two early prototypes ready for testing in just three months.
 
We’ve come a long way since the Ranger EV program,” Staley said in reference to Ford’s first foray into production electric vehicles during the 1990s. “While electric vehicle technology will continue to evolve, the Transit Connect Electric is our most advanced work to date, leveraging our considerable experience on our hydrogen fuel cell, plug-in hybrid and hybrid electric vehicle programs. It’s a very exciting time for advanced powertrain development at Ford.”
 
Personal Insights and Fun Facts
  • Scott is studying the Icelandic language, having become interested in Icelandic culture after speaking at university symposiums in Iceland and traveling through the country
  • Scott and his wife of 10 years, Karen, enjoy traveling, particularly Europe, because, as he says, the older they get, the more they appreciate “old things” like history, antiques and castles
  • Scott earned his bachelor’s degree from Purdue University, his master’s from University of Connecticut and his doctorate from Purdue, all in mechanical engineering
  • He enjoys reading, playing basketball and tennis, and commuting to work in his Ford Ranger electric vehicle, which is still on the road after 10 years
# # #
 
About Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company, a global automotive industry leader based in Dearborn, Mich., manufactures or distributes automobiles across six continents. With about 198,000 employees and about 90 plants worldwide, the company’s automotive brands include Ford, Lincoln, Mercury and Volvo. The company provides financial services through Ford Motor Credit Company. For more information regarding Ford’s products, please visit www.ford.com.
 
March 31, 2010
 

Content provided by href="http://media.ford.com/article_display.cfm?article_id=32330">Ford.com

Comments ()