Flathead V8: How to convert an oil bath filter to paper element

By Paul Penuel

I decided I wanted to do away with the messy oil bath filter and upgrade
to a modern paper element, but I didn’t want to take away the original look.
What to do? Use the oil bath filter housing!

I wasn’t sure how I was going to change from an oil bath to a paper
element filter, but after tossing some ideas around, I thought up of a real
easy way to do this. This procedure requires cutting the filter housing in
two pieces
,  removing all the old filter element(the
fuzzy stuff), then retrofitting the top part of the housing to fit over a
new paper element. Here are some pics I took while I did
this.

 

   
http://www.ford-trucks.com/articles/filter1.jpg
 


Here shows the oiginal oil bath filter off my flathead.
It comes in two pieces. the filter element fits inside the resivoir. I took
the resevoir to the parts store and measered an area that the new paper filter
would fit into. It was 8  1/4 by 3 inches. A Napa 2011 was a perfect
snug fit. Put the new filter in the resevoir housing and push it in snug
into the bottom recessed area. Then measure how deep the new filter is from
the top. You will need to know this so you can cut the old filter housing
in the right place.

http://www.ford-trucks.com/articles/filter2.jpg

     I took the measurements from the resevoir and marked
them on the housing measuring down from the top lip.
Using a small
cutoff saw, I carefully cut all the way around the housing.

http://www.ford-trucks.com/articles/filter3.jpg

After the cutting was done, the housing comes apart. Look at all the
fuzz! Pull all that stuff out along with the two wire mesh pieces. Clean
it out real good. Chunk the lower piece in the trash.

http://www.ford-trucks.com/articles/filter4.jpg

You will need to find something to seal the new filter so air and dirt
can’t leak in the top. A plastic bucket lid worked good for this. Cut it
the same size as the outside diameter of the paper filter. Punch a hole in
the middle of it so the stud can go through.

http://www.ford-trucks.com/articles/filter5.jpg

Here is the housing sandblasted and painted. Put the filter in and place
the bucket lid on top of it. You will need a piece of 1/4 inch pipe to fit
over the stud and plastic bucket lid. It will hold the plastic down tight
onto the filter after you put the top cover on. I cut the pipe almost two
inches.

http://www.ford-trucks.com/articles/filter6.jpg

Here it is all put together. I have a modern paper filter in my flatty
and you can’t even see it, so I didn’t loose any of the original look. This
was very easy to do. Total time for all the work was maybe an hour. It was
a cheap project to do, too. The new filter cost me a little over five
bucks.

 

 

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