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Subject: small-list Digest V2000 #207
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small-list Digest Mon, 11 Dec 2000 Volume: 2000  Issue: 207

In This Issue:
Re: Blue headlight bulbs
Re: Blue headlight bulbs
Monroe Reflex Shocks
Re: 89 Ford Ranger cutting out.
Re: Monroe Reflex Shocks

----------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Bolte Brent <Brent.Bolte kone.com>
Subject: Re: Blue headlight bulbs
Date: Mon, 11 Dec 2000 12:51:00 -0500

I don't think designers use HID systems to try and get
around any "lighting laws".  HID systems are just a much
more efficient way to generate light than any of the
filament based lighting systems out there (including
standard and halogen systems).  In toady's vehicles
where they are trying to get every last drop of fuel
economy out of the car they can, putting in an efficient
system like HID lighting is just another energy saver
(less electrical load = less power the alternator has to
generate = less load on the engine = better fuel economy).
HID systems however are somewhat expensive so right now
you typically only see them on cars in the luxury class.

You mention that HID systems have "no decent reflector system".
HID systems are much to "high tech" to use an antiquated
reflector system like filament based lighting systems use.
Most HID systems use highly polished glass elements in front
of the HID bulb to act as a lens to focus the light down on
the road exactly where they want it.  One of the car companies
(I believe Lexus) refers to them as projector beam headlamps
which is more or less what they are, a very bright bulb with
a lens system in front of it to direct the light where they want
it.  It probably appears to be overly bright because instead of
having a large reflector behind the bulb to spread the light
out in front you (like current filament based lights have ),
HID systems push all of their light through a smaller lens system projecting
the light out in front.

I'll have to admit that I think the light from cars with HID
lighting systems do look neat.  I looked into getting a set of
the "blue" halogen lamps for our Explorers but what I found was
that most of them are not DOT approved for road use.  If you
read the package for most of these "Blue" bulbs they tell you
that they are for off-road or show use only, not for general
highway use.  For most people that warning will go as far as
the warning they put on most of the smoked headlight and brake-
light covers which also tell you they are for off-road use only
or are only for use during daylight hours when headlamps are not required.
I do know that a few people in our area have been
stopped by our local DOT officials and given tickets for using
non-DOT approved "blue" headlamps in their non-HID vehicles.

Later, Brent Bolte


> On Sat, 9 Dec 2000 Keith Christensen wrote:

> HID's are actually a "styling design artist"s way of
> getting around the lighting laws as far as I'm concerned.
> They allow the 'light apeture' area of the vehicle to be
> small and odd-shaped (no decent reflector system) ; they
> "overpower" to compensate because their actual power draw
> is less than even standard halogens....


This message has been checked by KONE Corporation for the presence of computer viruses

-- HTML Attachment decoded to text by Listar --

Re: Blue headlight bulbs



I don't think designers use HID systems to try and get
around any "lighting laws".  HID systems are just a much
more efficient way to generate light than any of the
filament based lighting systems out there (including
standard and halogen systems).  In toady's vehicles
where they are trying to get every last drop of fuel
economy out of the car they can, putting in an efficient
system like HID lighting is just another energy saver
(less electrical load = less power the alternator has to
generate = less load on the engine = better fuel economy).
HID systems however are somewhat expensive so right now
you typically only see them on cars in the luxury class.

You mention that HID systems have "no decent reflector system".
HID systems are much to "high tech" to use an antiquated
reflector system like filament based lighting systems use.
Most HID systems use highly polished glass elements in front
of the HID bulb to act as a lens to focus the light down on
the road exactly where they want it.  One of the car companies
(I believe Lexus) refers to them as projector beam headlamps
which is more or less what they are, a very bright bulb with
a lens system in front of it to direct the light where they want
it.  It probably appears to be overly bright because instead of
having a large reflector behind the bulb to spread the light
out in front you (like current filament based lights have ),
HID systems push all of their light through a smaller lens system projecting
the light out in front.

I'll have to admit that I think the light from cars with HID
lighting systems do look neat.  I looked into getting a set of
the "blue" halogen lamps for our Explorers but what I found was
that most of them are not DOT approved for road use.  If you
read the package for most of these "Blue" bulbs they tell you
that they are for off-road or show use only, not for general
highway use.  For most people that warning will go as far as
the warning they put on most of the smoked headlight and brake-
light covers which also tell you they are for off-road use only
or are only for use during daylight hours when headlamps are not required.
Ido know that a few people in our area have been

stopped by our local DOT officials and given tickets for using
non-DOT approved "blue" headlamps in their non-HID vehicles.

Later, Brent Bolte


>On Sat, 9 Dec 2000 Keith Christensen wrote:

>HID's are actually a "styling design artist"s way of
>getting around the lighting laws as far as I'm concerned.
>They allow the 'light apeture' area of the vehicle to be
>small and odd-shaped (no decent reflector system) ; they
>"overpower" to compensate because their actual power draw
>is less than even standard halogens....


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 11 Dec 2000 17:19:43 +0000
From: Tim Curran <tcurran5 gte.net>
Subject: Re: Blue headlight bulbs


Something to keep in mind, allot of states prohibit the use of blue and red
lighting on the front of non-emergancy vehicles, decreased bulb output would be
the last of your worries.

>
> > Does anyone have any experience with these blue headlamp bulbs
> that you see in the customizing shops?  I have heard mixed reviews.
>
> Probably the WORST is that most of the "blue tint" bulbs actually
> decrease the real lumen output by anywhere between 20% to 60% of
> what the bulb itself puts out before the tint.
> (same goes with colored lenses, check out the lumens on cop stobes
> if you have a Fedreal or Whelen catalog available!)
>
> Next in problems is that the average human eye does not focus well
> on blue transmitted light in general, and it gets worse with age.
> I'm 50+ and I'm noticing that I can't accurately judge distance of
> an oncoming car with these 'blue tint's' . I'd wonder about the
> focusing of the owner's eyes  as well!!
>
> HID's are actually a "styling design artist"s way of getting around
> the lighting laws as far as I'm concerned. They allow the 'light
> apeture' area of the vehicle to be small and odd-shaped (no decent
> reflector system) ; they "overpower" to compensate because their
> actual power draw is less than even standard halogens....
>
> Just my two zlotnies...


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 11 Dec 2000 20:39:04 -0800
From: Bobby Craven <rcraven lexcominc.net>
Subject: Monroe Reflex Shocks


Has anyone tried these?  I have a 1991 Explorer that could use a new set
of shocks and I was wondering if the Reflex Shocks were worth twice as
much as the Gas-Matics.

Bobby



------------------------------

Date: Tue, 12 Dec 2000 00:05:27 -0500
From: George Kowal <gkowal earthlink.net>
Subject: Re: 89 Ford Ranger cutting out.


I had a similar problem but back when you had points in the distributor, one of
the capacitors (those small metal cans with a wire) was the wrong value.
George Kowal

Stephen Bozzone wrote:

> I would reccomend checking out the TFI Module.. especially if it hasn't been
> replaced in awhile or if it's original (rather unlikely).  Remove it and
> take it to Autozone.. they can test it for free.
>
> Good luck,
> Steve
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Jim Chapman" <jimslink pipeline.com>
> To: <small-list ford-trucks.com>
> Sent: Sunday, December 10, 2000 1:05 PM
> Subject: [small-list] Re: 89 Ford Ranger cutting out.
>
> >
> > Had very similar problem with 89 BII. Turned out to be intermittent HV
> > connection/partially corroded terminal at center distributor post .
> > v/r jimc  S.F.
> > jimslink pipeline.com
> > (703) 521-1545
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Matthew Schumacher" <schu schu.net>
> > To: <small-list ford-trucks.com>
> > Sent: Friday, December 08, 2000 12:26 PM
> > Subject: [small-list] 89 Ford Ranger cutting out.
> >
> >
> > >
> > > Hello List,
> > >
> > > My dad has a 89 ranger that keeps cutting out on him.  By that I mean,
> > > he is driving down the road and the ignition system goes dead for a sec
> > > but then it comes back.  We looked over all the cables and wires but
> > > where unable to find anything wrong.  Anyone have any ideas on how to
> > > fix it?
> > >
> > > thanks
> > >
> > > sch


------------------------------

From: "Steve Nash" <nashflr erols.com>
Subject: Re: Monroe Reflex Shocks
Date: Tue, 12 Dec 2000 18:05:07 -0500


If you can try and find Bilstein shocks.  They are about the best you can
find.

Steve

----- Original Message -----
From: Bobby Craven <rcraven lexcominc.net>
To: Ford Truck <small-list ford-trucks.com>
Sent: Monday, December 11, 2000 11:39 PM
Subject: [small-list] Monroe Reflex Shocks


>
> Has anyone tried these?  I have a 1991 Explorer that could use a new set
> of shocks and I was wondering if the Reflex Shocks were worth twice as
> much as the Gas-Matics.
>
> Bobby
>
>
>
>


------------------------------

End of small-list Digest V2000 #207
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