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small-list Digest Wed, 11 Oct 2000 Volume: 2000  Issue: 169

In This Issue:
Re: ABS Light 98 Explorer
Re: [Synthetic Oil]
ABS Light 98 Explorer
Re: Firestones
Re: [ABS Lights
Re: [Re: Firestones]
ADMIN: Tech Article added to web site

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Oct 2000 07:16:01 -0400
From: David Cooley <n5xmt triad.rr.com>
Subject: Re: ABS Light 98 Explorer

At 08:23 PM 10/10/2000 -0700, you wrote:
>This has happened 2 times to me and it happened to my girlfriend this
>morning.  Something on the dash catches your attention and you look down
>just in time to see the ABS light go out.  Is this likely to be cause for
>concern?  I'm inclined not to worry.
>
>By the way, are there inexpensive OBD scanners out there?  I had a $15 one
>for the EEC-IV that I liked but I can't find a similar one for OBD II.


you won't find one that cheap for OBD_II equipped vehicles...  if you have
a laptop, for around $100.00 you can get a good scantool from
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.obd-2.com/



------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Oct 2000 09:08:37 -0500
From: Buck Shoff <hawk sktc.net>
Subject: Re: [Synthetic Oil]

Thank you for your comments.  I threw my little tidbit in for those of
the group who might want to ponder a new theory or to think outside the
box.  I had never heard this fellows' idea before, but after reflecting
on it, I think it may have some merit.  If you can use it, fine.  If
not, maybe someone else can.

By the way, I guess we are kind of backwards around here, but we still
have several vehicles that still get straight 30W.  We must not be the
only ones, either, because all the distributors I know still stock it.

Buck


Bolte Brent wrote:
>
> Yes, a straight weight conventional oil (which is what they would
> probably use in an aircraft engine) will eventually "wear out" as
> well, but that generally takes a heck of a long time (and the oil
> would have probably been changed as a general maintenance item
> long before that would occur anyway).  In modern multi-weight
> oils like we use in automobile engines, conventional or synthetic,
> a viscosity improver is added to the base weight oil to prevent the
> oil from thinning as much as it warms up.  These viscosity improvers
> are made up of polymer strands that coil up when cold and allow the
> oil to perform like the normal base weight oil (in a 5W-30 that would
> be the 5 weight).  Once the oil starts to heat up, these polymer
> substances uncoil into long strands that prevent the oil from thinning
> out as much as it normally would and makes it act like a higher
> weight oil (in a 5W-30 this would be the 30 weight).  Over time, heat
> and the shearing forces encountered in bearing areas cause these
> polymer strands to break apart and lose their ability to form into long
> strands.  Once broken, they can no longer do their job of preventing
> the oil from thinning out at high temperatures (hence the term "oil
> breakdown").  Normal conventional oil has to have a large amount
> of viscosity improver added to it since it has a very high tendency
> to thin out as temperature increases.  Synthetic oil (of which the
> base stock is made from synthesized molecules which are by
> design more stable over a larger temperature range) is "engineered"
> to be more resistant to the tendency of thinning out as temperature
> increases and therefore requires very little of the viscosity improver
> additive to begin with (that's one of the reasons a synthetic oil
> will last longer than a conventional oil because even if the viscosity
> improver "breaks down" the oil still functions pretty much the same).
> Anyhow, to make a long story short, when you hear somebody say
> that a modern day oil is "worn out" or "broken down", its not the
> base oil that has failed, it is the viscosity improver that has failed.
> The base oil will still "protect" and lubricate your engine, but only
> as well as if you had a straight weight oil of the lower of the two
> weight numbers in the engine.
>
> This site has a pretty good write up on oil specs if you would like
> to check it out:  http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.vtr.org/maintain/oil-overview.html
>
> Believe me having grown up with a father that worked in the
> engineering department of a small Midwestern oil company
> that custom "designed" oils for use in the automotive, trucking,
> racing, and marine industries I learned an awful lot about all
> types of lubricating oils.  While working there in high school
> and while going to college I also got to attend many "oil design"
> classes put on by companies such as Amoco, Texaco, Conoco,
> and Sunoco (and after all that, I became a Computer Science
> major, go figure).
>
> On Tue, 03 Oct 2000 Buck Shoff wrote:
>
> > Some years ago, I had a conversation with an engineer
> > involved with piston aircraft engines.  He said that
> > the parts working against the oil inside an engine had
> > a shearing or tearing effect on the long stringy oil
> > molecule.  This tearing would shorten the individual
> > molecules, thus lowering the viscosity.  According to
> > him, oil does "wear out".  We were talking about
> > conventional oil, not synthetic.  Buck Shoff

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Oct 2000 08:26:12 +0100
From: Adam McLaughlin <kd6poc jps.net>
Subject: ABS Light 98 Explorer

I too would like to know about pulling codes on the ABS system. MY bronco 2's
ABS light will go on and off intermittantly, and I would like to know why. I
have bled everything, replaced lines, cylinders, sensors, all parts but the
valve in the frame rail.

Haynes is very vague about the procedure, but Chilton's refers to a connector
that can be found on the wheel well on the driver's side? You are supposed to
find it, ground it, and then count flashes. I am not to keen on grounding
wires on plugs that I am not sure of.

Adam

Dan Wentz wrote:

> This has happened 2 times to me and it happened to my girlfriend this
> morning.  Something on the dash catches your attention and you look down
> just in time to see the ABS light go out.  Is this likely to be cause for
> concern?  I'm inclined not to worry.
>
> By the way, are there inexpensive OBD scanners out there?  I had a $15 one
> for the EEC-IV that I liked but I can't find a similar one for OBD II.
>
> ~Dan
>
> 1950 F1 351C--Miles Since Last Mishap: 127
> 1998 Explorer--Now out of
> warranty.  Pleasedon'tbreakpleasedon'tbreadpleasedon'tbreak.
>


------------------------------

From: "Jim Bielecki" <bieleckj freeway.net>
Subject: Re: Firestones
Date: Wed, 11 Oct 2000 20:32:31 -0400


> > Has anyone had trouble with their firestone tires.  I had a pair of
> > firestones that were not under the recall and I had to change them after
> > 16,000 miles.  I am very very unhappy with their quality!  Anyone have a
> > similar story?  I have decided to boycott the companies products.
> >
_________________________________________________________________________
> > I have 109,000 miles on my '96 Ranger 4X4 and it still has the original
> Firestone Wilderness AT tires on it. They are not under the recall because
> they are P215's instead of P235's. They will last another 20K-30K by the
> looks of them. I rotate them regularly (all five). So each tire has 87,000
> miles on it.
> Ron Trampe

People are amazed when I tell them I put over 112,000 miles on the Firestone
ATX's that came on my '93 Explorer.  I figured they still had another 5,000
to 8,000 miles of life left but I replaced them with Good Year Wranglers, a
few months back, courtesy of the big recall.

Jim Bielecki



------------------------------

Date: 11 Oct 00 21:35:33 EDT
From: Tim Turner <ManicMechanicNC netscape.net>
Subject: Re: [ABS Lights

Adam McLaughlin <kd6poc jps.net> wrote:

> I too would like to know about pulling codes on the ABS system. MY bronco
2's
> ABS light will go on and off intermittantly, and I would like to know why.

You can find out!  :-)

> have bled everything, replaced lines, cylinders, sensors, all parts but the
> valve in the frame rail.

The sensors were a good possibility (and the usual culprit is a wheel speed
sensor or the wiring to it, so good call).  The proportioning valve (on the
frame) often gets replaced, but *rarely* fixes anything.  I think I've seen a
grand total of TWO in 15 years actually be bad. (neither were ABS light
problems BTW.)  Since yours has been lifted I'd check the wiring to the rear
speed sensor closely; not uncommon for the wiring to get chafed on unlifted
vehicles (Esp. early Expys).
>
> Haynes is very vague about the procedure, but Chilton's refers to a
connector
> that can be found on the wheel well on the driver's side?

The ones I've seen were in the drivers footwell; something about 'orange'
comes to mind, but I can't recall if that was the only, primary, or trace
color. (Or worse; thinking of the electronic speedometer connector...) I
printed this out and will take it to work for research.  :-)

> You are supposed to
> find it, ground it, and then count flashes. I am not to keen on grounding
> wires on plugs that I am not sure of.

I agree!  The procedure is correct though; ground the lead and count the ABS
flashes for the code #.  I'd wait for better information, but if you really
wanted to try grounding leads I'd use a 1 Amp fused jumper wire!  <BG>
>
> Adam
>
> Dan Wentz wrote:
>
> > This has happened 2 times to me and it happened to my girlfriend this
> > morning.  Something on the dash catches your attention and you look down
> > just in time to see the ABS light go out.  Is this likely to be cause for
> > concern?  I'm inclined not to worry.

Until it gets worse I'd agree, BUT.. be aware that when the light is on the
ABS is deactivated.  I dont think the codes are easily pulled like Adam's
<bummer..> but I'll check into that one too.  Like Adam's, check the wiring to
the wheel speed sensors, also you can pull the wheels and check for a build-up
of metal fragments on the sensor that interferes with it's operation. (or is
that a common Mopar problem?  Cant hurt to check either way..)

Summary.. wheel speed sensors/wiring/crud are common, sometimes crud gets in
the mechanical portion (the big unit with all the lines and costs $$) or the
solenoids in the unit go bad, the controller itself can fail also. (Also $$
but nowhere near the cost of the actuator.)  If the ABS AND Brake light come
on you may just be low on fluid in the resevoir.  The basic hydaulic system
needs to be 'right' also, but if it's not you'll likely notice other brake
problems besides just the ABS light.

A note on having ABS problems diagnosed... if you don't go to the dealer make
SURE your preferred shop is comfortable/knowledgeable on YOUR vehicle's ABS
system and has the proper tools to diagnose it.  Unlike OBD-II there is no
'standard' for diagnostics and there is a myriad of systems out there with
their own specific procedures and quirks.  Not all have 'field' diagnostics
available at this time.  (One of our best customers has a 2000 Mopar truck
with a STEADY ABS light; the local dealer says "no problem" (?!) even with the
latest updates to our Snap-On scanner no information available on this
vehicle.  Chrysler's DRB-III is required to acess it.  Speed sensors check OK
and until more info is available we don't want to go further on his dime; told
him of some other dealers in nearby towns and the tech's there to specifically
ask for.

> > By the way, are there inexpensive OBD scanners out there?  I had a $15
one
> > for the EEC-IV that I liked but I can't find a similar one for OBD II.

Closer to $100 for the 'generic' ones, as pointed out some interface with a
PC.  I recently wiped my archive of mails for space reasons but I'm sure the
list will come through with good options.  :-)  Some of the 'mass market'
parts houses will rent scanners, but the deposit is pretty stiff.

> > 1998 Explorer--Now out of
> > warranty.  Pleasedon'tbreakpleasedon'tbreadpleasedon'tbreak.

PleasefindgoodtechbeforeyouneeditPleasefindgoodtechbeforeyouneedit. ;-)

Tim

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------------------------------

Date: 11 Oct 00 22:00:48 EDT
From: Tim Turner <ManicMechanicNC netscape.net>
Subject: Re: [Re: Firestones]

"Jim Bielecki" <bieleckj freeway.net> wrote:

> People are amazed when I tell them I put over 112,000 miles on the
Firestone
> ATX's that came on my '93 Explorer.

I'm not amazed, but it is a definite indication that you drive in a rational
manner and *properly* maintain your vehicle.  :-)

I'll be interested to see what changes in Firestone will come in the near
future with Mr. Ono stepping down and Mr. Lampe taking over.  Of the many
letters from Firestone to retailers I'd found Mr. Lampe's to be more on the
'humanitarian' side than Mr Ono's 'business' side.  Might just be better BS,
but OTOH maybe it isn't...  About the only thing that'll pull Firestone's (and
to a smaller degree Ford's) chestnuts out of the fire is to address the
immediate problem and stop finger pointing.  Get 'em off the road for now and
THEN address the 'why' portion of Explorers being the primary failure vehicle.
(Ignoring the study that said Expy's roll in a higher proportion after tread
loss than other vehicles may or not be a factor; hard to predict the future
any further than I have! <BG>)

Tim

____________________________________________________________________
Get your own FREE, personal Netscape WebMail account today at http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://home.netscape.com/webmail

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Oct 2000 23:47:18 -0400
From: Ken Payne <kpayne ford-trucks.com>
Subject: ADMIN: Tech Article added to web site

Tech Article Added to the web site:

- Installing a Mid-60's Mustang Tank In A 1953 F-100
 By John Niolon

Its a very good article with photos.  John did a great
job.  Check it out:

<a href="http://www.ford-trucks.com/articles/index.html>www.ford-trucks.com/articles/index.html</a>

Ken Payne
Admin, Ford Truck Enthusiasts


------------------------------

End of small-list Digest V2000 #169
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