From: owner-small-list-digest ford-trucks.com (small-list-digest)
To: small-list-digest ford-trucks.com
Subject: small-list-digest V3 #222
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small-list-digest Monday, August 30 1999 Volume 03 : Number 222



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Ford Truck Enthusiasts - Ranger, Explorer, Bronco 2 and Aerostar
Visit our web site: http://www.ford-trucks.com/
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In this issue:

FTE Small - ADMIN: Lists were down
FTE Small - Synthetic Gear Lube
Re: FTE Small - Synthetic Gear Lube
AW: FTE Small - 4wd auto

=======================================================================

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Date: Sun, 29 Aug 1999 22:23:29 -0400
From: Ken Payne
Subject: FTE Small - ADMIN: Lists were down

Due to a config problem, the lists were down for the
past 36 hours. They should now be working. Most of
the postings during this period were lost.

Ken Payne
Admin, Ford Truck Enthusiasts
http://www.ford-trucks.com

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Date: Sun, 29 Aug 1999 21:42:56 -0700
From: "Hans Luckoff"
Subject: FTE Small - Synthetic Gear Lube

Does anyone know if the new Rangers come with synthetic gear lube in the
rear end. My son has a 97 F-150 and he has a tag on the rear end that says
75w-140 synthetic gear oil, my Ranger doesn't say whats in there. TIA
Hans

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Date: Sun, 29 Aug 1999 21:57:11 -0700
From: Adam McLaughlin
Subject: Re: FTE Small - Synthetic Gear Lube

What harm can you do by putting the fully synthetic stuff in there? That's
what I run, along with the LS additive in the rear/front end of my 1988 baby
bronc.

Adam

Hans Luckoff wrote:

> Does anyone know if the new Rangers come with synthetic gear lube in the
> rear end. My son has a 97 F-150 and he has a tag on the rear end that says
> 75w-140 synthetic gear oil, my Ranger doesn't say whats in there. TIA
> Hans
>
> == FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

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Date: Mon, 30 Aug 1999 09:13:59 +0200
From: "Ucen, Thomas, PRE"
Subject: AW: FTE Small - 4wd auto

This is just partly true. Especially when going uphill on a snowy road
pushing traction is better than pulling traction. Additional weight can
always be added on the rear axle with passengers or ballast.=20
When loading up the vehicle and/or pulling a trailer with a high tongue
weight it's better to have rear wheel drive. When the rear end is under
load, the front end tends to lift and tires tend to slip. Just last =
week I
hauled building materials with both a front wheel drive wagon (VW =
Passat)
and my Aerostar. The Passat (road was wet) had very poor traction while =
the
Aerostar ran perfectly.
As for driving empty - I've owned enough vehicles of both kind plus the
legendary beetle. Each "system" has its advantages and disadvantages =
but I
would not say that under normal conditions I'd really give my =
preference to
either one.

Tom
1993 Aerostar 3.0L

- -----Urspr=FCngliche Nachricht-----
Von: Mike Fisher [mailto:mdfisher gte.net]
Gesendet am: Freitag, 27. August 1999 03:01
An: small-list ford-trucks.com
Betreff: Re: FTE Small - 4wd auto

If you had never driven a front-wheel drive car in snow and ice, you
might believe this. I think, however, that Mr. Bedard was forgetting a
couple of important points.

The first advantage front-wheel drive has it that of having an =
increased
amount of weight on the steering/propelling wheels. This happens, of
course, because of the wheels being directly under (more or less) the
whole drivetrain. This forces the tires to get a better bite because of
being pressed onto the road surface with more force. It is rare on a
rear-wheel drive vehicle to have the weight of the entire drivetrain
directly over the rear wheels (unless you drive a VW Beetle, Porsche
Carrera, etc.)

The second advantage that front-wheel drive cars has is that the
propelling wheels are always pointed in the direction the car wants to
go, simply because they are also the steering wheels. On a rear-wheel
drive car, the wheels are always pointed parallel to the long axis of
the vehicle, which may or may not be the desired direction of travel.

It is true that if you add more power the driven wheels will have an
increased tendency to spin. (Duh) However, that does not mean that =
tires
cannot effectively split duty between steering and propulsion.

Mike Fisher
1997 AWD Mountaineer
K&N/Borla/31x10.5BFG-ATs/PIAA

Mike Harms wrote:
>=20
> I'll share a little way at looking at traction I got from an article =
I
read
> in an old Car and Driver magazine. The article was from Patrick =
Bedard
> (sp?) and it was back when there were a lot of myths about improved
traction
> from Front Wheel Drive cars as compared to rear wheel drive cars.
>=20
> You have to think of it in that a Tire has a "Fixed" amount of grip =
or
> "work" it can give you. On a Powered non-steering wheel the tire =
handles
> just the power transfer, and the braking energy. So basically when =
it is
> moving forward, 100% of the tire's work is put towards putting power =
to
the
> ground. When stopping 100% of the tire's work is allocated to =
stopping.
> Now on a Steering non-powered wheel, 100% of the tires work can be =
used
for
> directional control of the vehicle. On a steering and powered wheel, =
the
> tire has to allocate so much of it's work to steering, while also
> maintaining grip for accelerating or braking.
>=20
> As this applies to this question, if you already have low traction at =
a
tire
> due to any circumstance, adding power to that wheel will only =
decrease the
> available traction, not increase it.
>=20
> The only way to truly effect increased traction would be to find a =
tire
that
> can handle more work, or decrease the demands being placed on the =
tire.
=3D=3D FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info =
http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html
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------------------------------

End of small-list-digest V3 #222
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