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Subject: small-list-digest V3 #220
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small-list-digest Friday, August 27 1999 Volume 03 : Number 220



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Ford Truck Enthusiasts - Ranger, Explorer, Bronco 2 and Aerostar
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In this issue:

[FTE Small - Bronco II Hesitation]
FTE Small - RE: 4wd auto
Re: FTE Small - Shifting into Neutral
Re: [FTE Small - Bronco II Hesitation]
AW: [FTE Small - Bronco II Hesitation]
Re: FTE Small - Shifting into Neutral
RE: [FTE Small - Bronco II Hesitation]
RE: [FTE Small - Bronco II Hesitation]
Re: FTE Small - 4wd auto
Re: FTE Small - Shifting into Neutral
FTE Small - Squeaky Clutch
Re: FTE Small - Squeaky Clutch
Re: [Re: FTE Small - 4wd auto]
Re: FTE Small - 4wd auto
Re: FTE Small - Squeaky Clutch

=======================================================================

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 1999 08:45:28 -0400
From: "Jason Talbot"
Subject: [FTE Small - Bronco II Hesitation]

It might be the O2 sensor. My 88 Bronco II started doing that too. I
cleaned the Intake/Throttle body, and it didn't work. If you change the
O2 sensor, be prepared to use a torch to heat it up. I tried for a week
to get it off. I tried WD-40, Liquid wrench, and alot of elbow grease,
and it would budge!
Good luck


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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 1999 09:07:48 -0400
From: "Steinbrook, Steve"
Subject: FTE Small - RE: 4wd auto

Thanks for all the input regarding the use of 4wd auto mode in my 1996
Explorer. I didn't mean to imply that I cruise around on the highway at 75
during a downpour, hydroplaning all over the road. I am the one doing 45 in
the right lane behind a nice big 18 wheeler during a downpour. However, I
have had problems hydroplaning while going 20 mph in a heavy rain. I
believe this is due to my needing new tires. Ironically it rained yesterday
and I had a chance to use the 4wd auto. It eliminated the rear wheel spin
that I often get when starting from a stop, which was really the main
problem I had in wet weather conditions and the reason for inquiring about
4wd auto. Thanks again for all the info, it was very helpful and greatly
appreciated.
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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 1999 09:19:05 -0400
From: Jean Marc Chartier
Subject: Re: FTE Small - Shifting into Neutral

Robert Iserman wrote:
>
> Hi Jean Marc,
>
> What is a "T-case?" Do you mean the transmission housing or some part I am
> not familiar with?
>
> Bob Iserman
>
Bob,

The T-case is my abbreviation for the transfer case, sorry
about that. It is bolted to the transmission and the rear
and front drive shafts connect to it. It is the device that
splits power to the front and rear wheels.

Regards

Jean Marc chartier
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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 1999 09:43:00 -0400
From: David Cooley
Subject: Re: [FTE Small - Bronco II Hesitation]

At 08:45 AM 8/26/1999 -0400, you wrote:
>It might be the O2 sensor. My 88 Bronco II started doing that too. I
>cleaned the Intake/Throttle body, and it didn't work. If you change the
>O2 sensor, be prepared to use a torch to heat it up. I tried for a week
>to get it off. I tried WD-40, Liquid wrench, and alot of elbow grease,
>and it would budge!



Another good trick (And is recomended in the service manual) is to change
the sensor AFTER the engine has run up to operating temp while the
manifolds/exhaust are still hot.

===========================================================
David Cooley N5XMT Internet: N5XMT bellsouth.net
Packet: N5XMT KQ4LO.#INT.NC.USA.NA T.A.P.R. Member #7068
We are Borg... Prepare to be assimilated!
===========================================================

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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 1999 15:54:50 +0200
From: "Ucen, Thomas, PRE"
Subject: AW: [FTE Small - Bronco II Hesitation]

When I changed the sensor on my Aerostar I cut the plug off the wires,
slipped a ring wrench over the sensor and used a long iron bar to =
increase
my force. With some help of Liquid wrench it went off nicely.

Tom
'93 Aerostar 3.0L
- -----Urspr=FCngliche Nachricht-----
Von: David Cooley [mailto:n5xmt bellsouth.net]
Gesendet am: Donnerstag, 26. August 1999 15:43
An: small-list ford-trucks.com
Betreff: Re: [FTE Small - Bronco II Hesitation]

At 08:45 AM 8/26/1999 -0400, you wrote:
>It might be the O2 sensor. My 88 Bronco II started doing that too. I
>cleaned the Intake/Throttle body, and it didn't work. If you change =
the
>O2 sensor, be prepared to use a torch to heat it up. I tried for a =
week
>to get it off. I tried WD-40, Liquid wrench, and alot of elbow grease,
>and it would budge!



Another good trick (And is recomended in the service manual) is to =
change=20
the sensor AFTER the engine has run up to operating temp while the=20
manifolds/exhaust are still hot.

=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D
David Cooley N5XMT Internet: N5XMT bellsouth.net
Packet: N5XMT KQ4LO.#INT.NC.USA.NA T.A.P.R. Member #7068
We are Borg... Prepare to be assimilated!
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D

=3D=3D FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info =
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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 1999 08:19:48 -0700
From: William Street
Subject: Re: FTE Small - Shifting into Neutral

Bob,
I had similar symptoms on our Lincoln Towncar. We had the fluid & filer
changed and that seemed to fix the problem.

Bill

Robert Iserman wrote:

> My '98 Explorer XLT (SOHC, 5-speed automatic, Control-Trac, limited slip)
> has 12,000 miles on the odometer.
>
> Sometimes when I try to quickly accelerate from a standing start, entering
> a highway for instance, the transmission disengages and the engine just
> races. No power gets to the wheels. The same thing happens when I floor the
> throttle to kick down into passing gear. It feels like the transmission is
> shifting into neutral.
>
> In both cases, If I then take my foot off the gas and allow the engine to
> slow down, the drivetrain reconnects with a clunk and I can drive again
> provided I don't floor it.
>
> My dealer has checked the transmission fluid level (normal) and run
> computer checks all to no avail.
>
> Does anyone have any idea as to what specifically is the problem?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Bob Iserman
>
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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 1999 08:56:53 -0700
From: Eric Sneed
Subject: RE: [FTE Small - Bronco II Hesitation]

You can buy a 02 sensor socket for a couple of bucks that has a slot in
it. I used this and it made the job so much easier.

Eric

-----Original Message-----
From: Ucen, Thomas, PRE [SMTP:ThomasUcen premiere.de]
Sent: Thursday, August 26, 1999 6:55 AM
To: 'small-list ford-trucks.com'
Subject: AW: [FTE Small - Bronco II Hesitation]

When I changed the sensor on my Aerostar I cut the plug off the
wires,
slipped a ring wrench over the sensor and used a long iron bar
to increase
my force. With some help of Liquid wrench it went off nicely.

Tom
'93 Aerostar 3.0L
-----Urspr=FCngliche Nachricht-----
Von: David Cooley [mailto:n5xmt bellsouth.net]
Gesendet am: Donnerstag, 26. August 1999 15:43
An: small-list ford-trucks.com
Betreff: Re: [FTE Small - Bronco II Hesitation]

At 08:45 AM 8/26/1999 -0400, you wrote:
>It might be the O2 sensor. My 88 Bronco II started doing that
too. I
>cleaned the Intake/Throttle body, and it didn't work. If you
change the
>O2 sensor, be prepared to use a torch to heat it up. I tried
for a week
>to get it off. I tried WD-40, Liquid wrench, and alot of elbow
grease,
>and it would budge!



Another good trick (And is recomended in the service manual) is
to change=20
the sensor AFTER the engine has run up to operating temp while
the=20
manifolds/exhaust are still hot.

=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D
David Cooley N5XMT Internet: N5XMT bellsouth.net
Packet: N5XMT KQ4LO.#INT.NC.USA.NA T.A.P.R. Member #7068
We are Borg... Prepare to be assimilated!
=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=
=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D=3D

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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 1999 10:32:18 PDT
From: "Wayne Signs"
Subject: RE: [FTE Small - Bronco II Hesitation]

Thanks for all of the suggestions!


>From: Eric Sneed
>Reply-To: small-list ford-trucks.com
>To: "'small-list ford-trucks.com'"
>Subject: RE: [FTE Small - Bronco II Hesitation]
>Date: Thu, 26 Aug 1999 08:56:53 -0700
>
>You can buy a 02 sensor socket for a couple of bucks that has a slot in
>it. I used this and it made the job so much easier.
>
>Eric
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Ucen, Thomas, PRE [SMTP:ThomasUcen premiere.de]
> Sent: Thursday, August 26, 1999 6:55 AM
> To: 'small-list ford-trucks.com'
> Subject: AW: [FTE Small - Bronco II Hesitation]
>
> When I changed the sensor on my Aerostar I cut the plug off the
>wires,
> slipped a ring wrench over the sensor and used a long iron bar
>to increase
> my force. With some help of Liquid wrench it went off nicely.
>
> Tom
> '93 Aerostar 3.0L
> -----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----
> Von: David Cooley [mailto:n5xmt bellsouth.net]
> Gesendet am: Donnerstag, 26. August 1999 15:43
> An: small-list ford-trucks.com
> Betreff: Re: [FTE Small - Bronco II Hesitation]
>
> At 08:45 AM 8/26/1999 -0400, you wrote:
> >It might be the O2 sensor. My 88 Bronco II started doing that
>too. I
> >cleaned the Intake/Throttle body, and it didn't work. If you
>change the
> >O2 sensor, be prepared to use a torch to heat it up. I tried
>for a week
> >to get it off. I tried WD-40, Liquid wrench, and alot of elbow
>grease,
> >and it would budge!
>
>
>
> Another good trick (And is recomended in the service manual) is
>to change
> the sensor AFTER the engine has run up to operating temp while
>the
> manifolds/exhaust are still hot.
>
> ===========================================================
> David Cooley N5XMT Internet: N5XMT bellsouth.net
> Packet: N5XMT KQ4LO.#INT.NC.USA.NA T.A.P.R. Member #7068
> We are Borg... Prepare to be assimilated!
> ===========================================================
>
> == FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info
>http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html
> == FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info
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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 1999 14:33:13 -0500
From: Mike Harms
Subject: Re: FTE Small - 4wd auto

I'll share a little way at looking at traction I got from an article I read
in an old Car and Driver magazine. The article was from Patrick Bedard
(sp?) and it was back when there were a lot of myths about improved traction
from Front Wheel Drive cars as compared to rear wheel drive cars.

You have to think of it in that a Tire has a "Fixed" amount of grip or
"work" it can give you. On a Powered non-steering wheel the tire handles
just the power transfer, and the braking energy. So basically when it is
moving forward, 100% of the tire's work is put towards putting power to the
ground. When stopping 100% of the tire's work is allocated to stopping.
Now on a Steering non-powered wheel, 100% of the tires work can be used for
directional control of the vehicle. On a steering and powered wheel, the
tire has to allocate so much of it's work to steering, while also
maintaining grip for accelerating or braking.

As this applies to this question, if you already have low traction at a tire
due to any circumstance, adding power to that wheel will only decrease the
available traction, not increase it.

The only way to truly effect increased traction would be to find a tire that
can handle more work, or decrease the demands being placed on the tire.

>Date: Tue, 24 Aug 1999 17:40:32 -0400
>From: "David A. Cooley"
>Subject: Re: FTE Small - 4wd auto

>At 05:27 PM 8/24/99 -0400, you wrote:
>>Is it harmful for the vehicle to use 4wd auto on hard surfaces in the rain
>>while driving at high speeds? I have a 1996 Explorer Sport that fishtails
>>and hydroplanes in wet weather. Is it OK to use the 4wd auto mode while
on
...
>Hydroplaning isn't a function of 4WD or 2WD. It's the tires and the
>conditions. If you are hydroplaning it means SLOW DOWN. Your tires aren't

>able to move the water out from under them. A different tire may help.
>If you have the control trac, you have no choice but to use 4WD auto on the

...
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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 1999 14:46:48 -0500
From: Mike Harms
Subject: Re: FTE Small - Shifting into Neutral

Bob,

T-Case is just short for "Transfer Case" In a Four Wheel drive system, this
is the component that is after the transmission and sends the power to the
rear and front wheels. I'm not certain if the transfer case in your Ford
has a neutral or not.

As it is under warranty I would take it to a dealer. If the first dealer
you dealt with didn't seem to be too concerned I would try another dealer.
That type of wind up in the driveline is typically not a good sign. It does
sound like a possible transfer case issue, unless the electronics in the
transmission are screwing up. Because if you increase the RPM's of the
engine, this should spin the transmission faster. For this to not also move
your vehicle faster either the transmission is in neutral, or something
serious is going bad in it. But if the transmission was going real bad, I
would think you would notice it no matter what speed you were trying to
achieve.

Anyone know if that's a vacumme actuated control on that year transfer case?
Does it require vacumme to engage or disengage. Could a vacumme leak cause
this?

>Date: Thu, 26 Aug 1999 01:08:02 -0400
>From: Robert Iserman
>Subject: Re: FTE Small - Shifting into Neutral

>Hi Jean Marc,

>What is a "T-case?" Do you mean the transmission housing or some part I am
>not familiar with?

>Bob Iserman


>At 12:35 AM 8/26/99 -0400, you wrote:
>>Robert Iserman wrote:
>> >
>> > My '98 Explorer XLT (SOHC, 5-speed automatic, Control-Trac, limited
slip)
>> > has 12,000 miles on the odometer.
>> >
>> > Sometimes when I try to quickly accelerate from a standing start,
entering
>> > a highway for instance, the transmission disengages and the engine just
>> > races. No power gets to the wheels. The same thing happens when I floor
the
>> > throttle to kick down into passing gear. It feels like the transmission
is
>> > shifting into neutral.
...
>>
>> Sounds like the T-case is slipping. Have they checked it
>>out?
>>
>>Regards
>>
>>Jean Marc Chartier
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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 1999 17:17:39 -0400
From: "Don Harrison"
Subject: FTE Small - Squeaky Clutch

Hi folks,

I have recently purchased a 98 Ranger Splash (V6, 3L and 5 Speed) and have
developed a problem with the clutch squeaking (rubbing?) near the bottom of
the pedal travel. I took it into the shop, they said they fixed it. However,
within a couple of hours the squeak had returned. A buddy of mine had a look
at it and we have all but ruled out anything inside the firewall. Is there
anything else I could have a look at?

Thanks,
- ------------------------------
Don Harrison
1998 Ford Ranger Splash
3.0L 5speed
- ------------------------------


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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 1999 18:00:54 -0400
From: Phil Snider
Subject: Re: FTE Small - Squeaky Clutch

Don,

Seems like there was a TSB for that problem on 97's. Ask your local
Ford dealer if there is one.

Phil


Don Harrison wrote:
>
> Hi folks,
>
> I have recently purchased a 98 Ranger Splash (V6, 3L and 5 Speed) and have
> developed a problem with the clutch squeaking (rubbing?) near the bottom of
> the pedal travel. I took it into the shop, they said they fixed it. However,
> within a couple of hours the squeak had returned. A buddy of mine had a look
> at it and we have all but ruled out anything inside the firewall. Is there
> anything else I could have a look at?
>
> Thanks,
> ------------------------------
> Don Harrison
> 1998 Ford Ranger Splash
> 3.0L 5speed
> ------------------------------
>
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------------------------------

Date: 26 Aug 99 20:05:49 EDT
From: Tim Turner
Subject: Re: [Re: FTE Small - 4wd auto]

Mike Harms wrote:
> I'll share a little way at looking at traction I got from an article I =
read
> in an old Car and Driver magazine. The article was from Patrick Bedard=

> (sp?) =


Correct spelling as I recall; odd that you cite him, a few days ago I
reminiscing in my mind the old C&D gang that I used to read at about that=
time
(Late '70s and early-mid '80s).
=


and it was back when there were a lot of myths about improved traction
> from Front Wheel Drive cars as compared to rear wheel drive cars.

Sort of a myth, and sort of true.. I remeber when the VW 'pickup' and th=
e
Dodge Rampage were new and it was advised that sometimes the best way up =
a
hill in these FWD trucks was to use reverse for increased weight transfer=
to
the tires. ;-) I'll stick to RWD/4WD in my trucks though, thank you.

> =

> You have to think of it in that a Tire has a "Fixed" amount of grip or

Quite correct. In certain situations a driver might elect to exceed that=
grip
to induce oversteer, but unless you've had some training on how/when/why =
I
wouldn't suggest it! I might also point out that trucks unless loaded do=
not
have a favorable weight distribution for traction. (The reason some peop=
le
use sand bags etc. in the bed during snow.) SUVs are a bit better in thi=
s
regard, but still kind of 'tail happy' unloaded. This is one reason all =
my
offroad stuff, spare parts etc. are in the very back of my B-II and also =
why
I'm a bit leery of mounting a winch on the front.

> The only way to truly effect increased traction would be to find a tire=

that
> can handle more work, or decrease the demands being placed on the tire.=


Or.. For high performance use, a softer compound (stickier) tire and/or a=

shorter sidewall to increase the cornering capability; however this will =
not
help WET traction.

> =

> >Date: Tue, 24 Aug 1999 17:40:32 -0400
> >From: "David A. Cooley"
> >Subject: Re: FTE Small - 4wd auto
> =

> >At 05:27 PM 8/24/99 -0400, you wrote:
> >>Is it harmful for the vehicle to use 4wd auto on hard surfaces in the=

rain
> >>while driving at high speeds? I have a 1996 Explorer Sport that
fishtails
> >>and hydroplanes in wet weather. Is it OK to use the 4wd auto mode wh=
ile
> on
> ...
> >Hydroplaning isn't a function of 4WD or 2WD. It's the tires and the =

> >conditions. If you are hydroplaning it means SLOW DOWN. Your tires
aren't
> =

> >able to move the water out from under them. A different tire may help=
=2E

Quite correct. If you really have to go that fast in the water, then try=
one
of the various 'aqua'-something tires, but realize that's still just a s=
afety
margin and not a 'fix'. A tire only has so many grooves at 2-11/32"; if =
the
water looks deeper than your tread (yes I mean 1/8-1/4") you need to be w=
ary
and reduce speed.

> >If you have the control trac, you have no choice but to use 4WD auto o=
n =


4WD might be of some comfort, but unless you have new tires on the front =
and
worn out ones on the rear then it means that when the rears hydroplane th=
e
fronts are perilously close themselves.

Tim

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Date: Thu, 26 Aug 1999 20:01:12 -0500
From: Mike Fisher
Subject: Re: FTE Small - 4wd auto

If you had never driven a front-wheel drive car in snow and ice, you
might believe this. I think, however, that Mr. Bedard was forgetting a
couple of important points.

The first advantage front-wheel drive has it that of having an increased
amount of weight on the steering/propelling wheels. This happens, of
course, because of the wheels being directly under (more or less) the
whole drivetrain. This forces the tires to get a better bite because of
being pressed onto the road surface with more force. It is rare on a
rear-wheel drive vehicle to have the weight of the entire drivetrain
directly over the rear wheels (unless you drive a VW Beetle, Porsche
Carrera, etc.)

The second advantage that front-wheel drive cars has is that the
propelling wheels are always pointed in the direction the car wants to
go, simply because they are also the steering wheels. On a rear-wheel
drive car, the wheels are always pointed parallel to the long axis of
the vehicle, which may or may not be the desired direction of travel.

It is true that if you add more power the driven wheels will have an
increased tendency to spin. (Duh) However, that does not mean that tires
cannot effectively split duty between steering and propulsion.

Mike Fisher
1997 AWD Mountaineer
K&N/Borla/31x10.5BFG-ATs/PIAA

Mike Harms wrote:
>
> I'll share a little way at looking at traction I got from an article I read
> in an old Car and Driver magazine. The article was from Patrick Bedard
> (sp?) and it was back when there were a lot of myths about improved traction
> from Front Wheel Drive cars as compared to rear wheel drive cars.
>
> You have to think of it in that a Tire has a "Fixed" amount of grip or
> "work" it can give you. On a Powered non-steering wheel the tire handles
> just the power transfer, and the braking energy. So basically when it is
> moving forward, 100% of the tire's work is put towards putting power to the
> ground. When stopping 100% of the tire's work is allocated to stopping.
> Now on a Steering non-powered wheel, 100% of the tires work can be used for
> directional control of the vehicle. On a steering and powered wheel, the
> tire has to allocate so much of it's work to steering, while also
> maintaining grip for accelerating or braking.
>
> As this applies to this question, if you already have low traction at a tire
> due to any circumstance, adding power to that wheel will only decrease the
> available traction, not increase it.
>
> The only way to truly effect increased traction would be to find a tire that
> can handle more work, or decrease the demands being placed on the tire.
== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 26 Aug 1999 21:36:21 -0400
From: Bryce
Subject: Re: FTE Small - Squeaky Clutch

if it sounds like a like you're stepping on a ducks head, it's your
clutch slave cylinder...you might still be able to shift ok, and you
probably haven't lost fluid...don't let them give you any song and dance....


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