small-list-digest Saturday, May 1 1999 Volume 03 : Number 103



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Ford Truck Enthusiasts - Ranger, Explorer, Bronco 2 and Aerostar
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In this issue:

Re: FTE Small - Sun Visor for sale
RE: FTE Small - O2 Sensor
RE: FTE Small - O2 Sensor
RE: FTE Small - O2 Sensor
RE: FTE Small - O2 Sensor
Re: FTE Small - O2 Sensor (warning; long)
Re: FTE Small - 89' Bronco II Clutch
FTE Small - 2.3 L carb problems
FTE Small - 1995 Ranger 4x4
Re: FTE Small - 2.3 L carb problems
RE: FTE Small - O2 Sensor
RE: FTE Small - Super Chip
RE: FTE Small - O2 Sensor (warning; long)
RE: FTE Small - O2 Sensor
Re: FTE Small - 89' Bronco II Clutch

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Date: Fri, 30 Apr 1999 05:54:36 -0700
From: "Michael D. Sheridan"
Subject: Re: FTE Small - Sun Visor for sale

FrdRngrLvr aol.com wrote:
>
> For Sale Sun Visior for a 93-97 Ranger Currently Williow Green Metalic.
>
> make an offer you pay shiping
>
> Later
>
> Jim
> 96 Ranger 160 Hp 4 cylinder 4x2
> 84 Ranger 4x4
> == FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

Hi:

I could be interested but was wondering why
it won't fit on my 1999 Mazda B2500 regular
cab?

Sincerely,

Michael
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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Apr 1999 06:33:38 -0700
From: Ray Scheidnes
Subject: RE: FTE Small - O2 Sensor

An O2 sensor went out in my 94 Ranger 4.0 4x4 a couple years ago. My "check
engine" warning light lit up on my dashboard while on a trip. I took it to
the dealer upon returning and they connected their computer to the vehicle
to determine that the sensor died. I had it replaced and boy, was it pretty
expensive. Cost around $200 if I recall correctly...
I guess that I just rely on my truck's computer to inform me when the sensor
is out.

> ----------
> From: Ryan Miller[SMTP:frmiller plix.com]
> Reply To: small-list ford-trucks.com
> Sent: Thursday, April 29, 1999 7:56 PM
> To: small-list ford-trucks.com
> Subject: FTE Small - O2 Sensor
>
> How does one know when to replace the O2 sensor in a Bronco
> II (or any vehicle, for that matter)? The oxygen sensors
> that I've dealt with (I'm an electrical engineer working in
> the field of environmental controls) slowly degrade; they
> don't just fail. I'm assuming that auto O2 sensors are the
> same, so they could be good enough to not trigger a fault
> code, but bad enough to affect the fuel mixture adversely.
> Is this true? If so, how do you test them? Or do you just
> toss them after a certain amount of time? I figure that the
> sensor in my '87 BII with 160K miles is probably original,
> but I've only owned it for the last year, so I don't know
> for sure.
>
> Any help would be appreciated.
>
> Ryan
>
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>
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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Apr 1999 11:28:23 -0400
From: Dave Slotter
Subject: RE: FTE Small - O2 Sensor

At 6:33 AM -0700 4/30/99, Ray Scheidnes wrote:
>An O2 sensor went out in my 94 Ranger 4.0 4x4 a couple years ago. My "check
>engine" warning light lit up on my dashboard while on a trip. I took it to
>the dealer upon returning and they connected their computer to the vehicle
>to determine that the sensor died. I had it replaced and boy, was it pretty
>expensive. Cost around $200 if I recall correctly...
>I guess that I just rely on my truck's computer to inform me when the sensor
>is out.

They charged you $200 to replace a sensor? That's pretty expensive.
The sensor itself should only cost $30-$40. Even if they charge you
for two hours labor at our local rate of $50/hr that should only be
$140 tops. If they take two hours to fix that, that's pretty bad. We
changed ours out ourselves in only about 30 minutes, including using
blowtorch to help loosen it up.

If someone had used anti-sieze, it would have been a much easier job.

- -Dave
- --

ICQ# 16458879 AOL/AIM ID: "Mac XR"
1986 Ford Bronco II Gray Manual 2.9 V6 123K Pittsburgh PA

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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Apr 1999 08:58:04 -0700
From: Ray Scheidnes
Subject: RE: FTE Small - O2 Sensor

Well, we all know how some dealers can be...
I don't recall the exact price that I paid, but I remember being a bit
shocked by the cost. I think you are probably more correct, it was probably
around $150 or so. I probably paid way more than I should have. But, now I
know what and where the sensor is, so if it ever goes out again, I'll try to
change it myself. Looks like you just need to somehow unscrew it from the
exhaust pipe and unplug the wiring. Good thing is that they told me that
this sensor should be working correctly for the motor to run efficiently,
but it wouldn't have left me stranded in the middle of the desert...

> ----------
> From: Dave Slotter[SMTP:dave slotter.org]
> Reply To: small-list ford-trucks.com
> Sent: Friday, April 30, 1999 8:28 AM
> To: small-list ford-trucks.com
> Subject: RE: FTE Small - O2 Sensor
>
> At 6:33 AM -0700 4/30/99, Ray Scheidnes wrote:
> >An O2 sensor went out in my 94 Ranger 4.0 4x4 a couple years ago. My
> "check
> >engine" warning light lit up on my dashboard while on a trip. I took it
> to
> >the dealer upon returning and they connected their computer to the
> vehicle
> >to determine that the sensor died. I had it replaced and boy, was it
> pretty
> >expensive. Cost around $200 if I recall correctly...
> >I guess that I just rely on my truck's computer to inform me when the
> sensor
> >is out.
>
> They charged you $200 to replace a sensor? That's pretty expensive.
> The sensor itself should only cost $30-$40. Even if they charge you
> for two hours labor at our local rate of $50/hr that should only be
> $140 tops. If they take two hours to fix that, that's pretty bad. We
> changed ours out ourselves in only about 30 minutes, including using
> blowtorch to help loosen it up.
>
> If someone had used anti-sieze, it would have been a much easier job.
>
> -Dave
> --
>
>
> ICQ# 16458879 AOL/AIM ID: "Mac
> XR"
> 1986 Ford Bronco II Gray Manual 2.9 V6 123K Pittsburgh PA
>
> == FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html
>
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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Apr 1999 12:43:10 -0400
From: Dave Slotter
Subject: RE: FTE Small - O2 Sensor

At 8:58 AM -0700 4/30/99, Ray Scheidnes wrote:
>Well, we all know how some dealers can be...
>I don't recall the exact price that I paid, but I remember being a bit
>shocked by the cost. I think you are probably more correct, it was probably
>around $150 or so. I probably paid way more than I should have. But, now I
>know what and where the sensor is, so if it ever goes out again, I'll try to
>change it myself. Looks like you just need to somehow unscrew it from the
>exhaust pipe and unplug the wiring. Good thing is that they told me that
>this sensor should be working correctly for the motor to run efficiently,
>but it wouldn't have left me stranded in the middle of the desert...

Yes, it provides feedback on whether the engine is running lean or
rich and the computer adjusts the fuel mixture via the injectors
accordingly. But to save $$$ on gas, this is the #1 item in my book
to make sure it is working correctly.

The tough thing is that on the Ranger/Bronco II the O2 sensor is
tough to remove and you may have to apply heat to help get the O2
sensor out. Actually, the O2 sensor is a HEGO sensor - Heated Exhaust
Gas Oxygen (I believe) and in addition to the computer getting a
reading via one wire on how much oxygen is in the exhaust gases, the
other leads provide power for a heating element in the sensor. The
exhaust system is grounded so that's why one wire is only needed for
the sensor feedback. I imagine they found you couldn't use the ground
for the power to the heating element also - probably too much
feedback. But I'm not an EE so that's out of my experience.

On my Merkur XR4Ti (also a Ford) the O2 sensor is a simple EGO - just
one lead to the sensor for the computer feedback. My guess is that
since it's in the engine compartment next to the turbo, it's already
hot enough. Again, this is just speculation.

- -Dave
- --

ICQ# 16458879 AOL/AIM ID: "Mac XR"
1986 Ford Bronco II Gray Manual 2.9 V6 123K Pittsburgh PA

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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Apr 1999 20:38:00 -0400
From: Tim Turner
Subject: Re: FTE Small - O2 Sensor (warning; long)

Ryan Miller wrote:
>
> How does one know when to replace the O2 sensor in a Bronco
> II (or any vehicle, for that matter)?

Time, mileage, MPG drop (often gradual). The suggested replacement used
to be 50K miles bu that was 10-15 years ago when vehicles weren't as
clean. I'd suggest 100K as a good time for replacement unless needed
sooner.

> The oxygen sensors
> that I've dealt with (I'm an electrical engineer working in
> the field of environmental controls) slowly degrade; they
> don't just fail.

Essentially so in the automotive field, but by the time it runs bad
enough for me to see 'em they're usually dead. On the sensors equipped
with a heating element (HEGO) the heater can short to the sensor for a
quick failure, but that's not the fault of the actual sensor tip. (What
type of controls? My father does a lot of work with industrial
pollution controls as a Chem E Ph.D.)

> I'm assuming that auto O2 sensors are the
> same, so they could be good enough to not trigger a fault
> code, but bad enough to affect the fuel mixture adversely.
> Is this true?

Very much so. The computer is just looking for a sensor that isn't
switching rich/lean often enough before it'll set a code. Contaminants
such as silicone (from cheap RTV) or anti freeze can 'skew' the sensor
and the computer adjusts the fuel based on faulty input. Newer vehicles
have multiple sensors and can usually determine one has failed so the
result isn't as bad there. 96 and newer vehicles have sensors directly
in front and back of the converter(s) to monitor the efficiency of the
converter and will set a code for a degraded cat. I've seen as many as
6 sensors on one vehicle and all HEGO type.. I dont think I'd want to
replace all 6 at once!

> If so, how do you test them?

Various ways, but I assume you have access to a 'scope so I'll focus on
that first. Hold the RPM at 2500 (and fully warmed up) with the leads
connected to the sensor output and ground; should be rapidly switching
above/below 450 mV. Minimum is 5x in 10 seconds, but I prefer it to be
quicker than that. Snap the throttle a few times and you should see a
quick rich (650+) followed by a longer lean reading. If the sensor is
staying on the rich side at 2500 RPM try popping the vacuum hose from
the brake booster and see if it goes lean (low) quickly; if so it's too
rich and there's another problem involved. If the sensor is staying
lean then try a snort of carb cleaner in the intake to see if the
reading goes up or not; yes means it's too lean and no means bad
sensor. These tests can also be done with a fast DMM such as a Fluke,
preferably one with a bar meter and should *NOT* be done with an analog
Voltmeter as the impedance is too low.

Whew.. Break time, meet back here in 5 minutes; the vending machines are
around the corner.

Now with all that said.. that still wont pin point a skewed sensor.
Thought is required on those. :-) If it's billowing black smoke but
the sensor is merrily switching away I'd advise replacement!

> Or do you just toss them after a certain amount of time?

Depends on your income and inclination. Seriously though; like the
converter the better the vehicle has been maintained the more likely it
is to last a long time.

> I figure that the
> sensor in my '87 BII with 160K miles is probably original,
> but I've only owned it for the last year, so I don't know
> for sure.

Probably so, but wouldn't hurt to test it first. Amazingly my '85 is
border line slow to switch with the original at 157K and a carb that
runs rich at low speeds. (I'll change it when I do the carb though.)

If you do change it make sure there is anti seize on the threads for
future removal. If there's not enough room for a wrench you'll need to
either buy (rent?) an O2 socket or fabricate one by cutting a slit in a
7/8" deep socket for the wire(s) to pass through. You can just cut the
wire off, *BUT* if you cant get the sensor out you're now stuck.. I
know it's a lot harder on the hands, but often they'll come out of the
exhaust easier when hot. Try it cold first though!

>
> Any help would be appreciated.

Hope this was of some help. ;-)

Tim Turner/Manic Mechanic
Custer Auto Repair
Wilmington NC


Class dismissed!
>
> Ryan
>
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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Apr 1999 21:24:17 -0400
From: Tim Turner
Subject: Re: FTE Small - 89' Bronco II Clutch

Matthew Banevich wrote:
>
> I have started the procedure of replacing my clutch in my Bronco II, I
> have removed both drive shafts and the transfer case.

Have fun.. with air tools and a lift it took me and Richard (another
tech) a good 6 hours on my '85 B-II. Of course we're drivability & A/C
guys rather than tranny tech's.

> My question is....
>
> 1. What do I have to do to get the bell housing apart from the engine?

a) Find the hidden bolt(s).
b) Shake, rattle etc.
c) carefully pry, but be sure a) is taken care of.. broke an ear off of
the bell housing on my Trooper that way.

> 2. What do I do with the hose for the reserviour for the Clutch Fluid?

Does it have a quick disconnect in the line? If so then disconnect with
special tool or suitable equivalent; if not.. ('85 does not) remove the
reservoir and master assembly and bring it out with the transmission
being careful to not snag anything in the process.

> 3. What do I do with the stuff for the shifter?

Remove from top; may have to slightly cut the carpet in the corners to
get access. Shifter knob unscrews and t-case knob pulls off and will
rattle for ever more. (RTV or similar will cure it if you ever get
around to it.)

> 4. Is there anymore crap I have to worry about to get the transmission
> out?

Keep band aids and neo-sporin handy. Some release bearings are mounted
behind the bell housing requiring removal of that to change it. I would
NOT suggest reusing the old bearing because it will go bad down the road
and you surely wont want to do this job again any time soon.

> 5. Is it better to buy the kit from Autozone or Pep Boys.....
> Autozone has it in stock....
> Pep Boys has it special order....

No experience with Pep Boys, but many bad experiences requiring
re-removal with clutch components from the mass marketer discount parts
houses. Spend the $$ for a premium clutch kit or OEM part.
Surprisingly the dealer is sometimes cheaper than the after market for a
'new' clutch kit. Make sure you have a alignment tool either rented or
supplied with the kit as it wont go back together if the disk isn't
aligned properly with the crank.

> 6. Does a new gasket for the connection between the transfer Case and
> the Transmission come with the clutch kit?

No. "Form a gasket" or similar black RTV will do nicely though; just
dont go overboard with it and make sure to remove all the old gasket
material first.

>
> Thanks in advance for any help... this is my first time doing such a
> thing....

Take it slow and a helper is a must for some parts. Take a break
whenever you get frustrated!

Tim
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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Apr 1999 21:35:04 -0500 (CDT)
From: New_Life_Time webtv.net
Subject: FTE Small - 2.3 L carb problems

- --WebTV-Mail-1809380512-1325
Content-Type: Text/Plain; Charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7Bit

Hello list. I'm new to the list. I'm Brian. I live in Branson, Mo.
I have a 1986 Ranger (small truck) with a 2.3 L engine. It has a 2
barrel carb that floods alot. I can't seem to find a rebuild kit for it
and was wondering if any one could tell me anything about this carb or
how to solve the flooding problem. Is there diffrent types of carbs for
the 2.3 ? Mine has the intake that has the adapter plate under the carb.
I've been told that you can remove this plate and run a full sized carb
on this engine?????
Any help greatly appreciated.


- --WebTV-Mail-1809380512-1325
Content-Description: signature
Content-Disposition: Inline
Content-Type: Text/HTML; Charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7Bit


od/
Zzunknow.mid" loop="infinite"
Brian and Cristy
................................................................Been
there, dome that, forgot about it...so what!


- --WebTV-Mail-1809380512-1325--
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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Apr 1999 22:54:59 -0400
From: David
Subject: FTE Small - 1995 Ranger 4x4

Today, I went and looked at a 1995 Ranger 4x4 extended cab, 4L,5spd. The
truck has 22k on the odometer and judging from the condition of the truck I
believe this to be true. The truck was originally purchased in New York and
spent two winters there before the current owner moved down here to
florida. The truck rides like it's new. However, I think that the truck has
been repainted because at some point it was involved in a wreck. The frame
of the truck looks straight as an arrow and does not show any signs of
being repaired. The area around the inside of the drivers door looks as
though it may have been repaired at one time. Also the manufacturing
stickers and other information found in this area are missing. Are there
any other tings I should look for or beaware of that might be a problem?
Currently the owner is asking $9000.00 and is open to offers. He told me
that he needs to sell the truck for money and I believe that he wants to
sell it fairly soon. Any ideas or suggestions would be appreciated.

David
perfgauge xtalwind.net
David Metcalfe


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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Apr 1999 23:29:06 EDT
From: XXDiveNutX aol.com
Subject: Re: FTE Small - 2.3 L carb problems

Brian do you have a Carter two barrel on your truck
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Date: Sat, 1 May 1999 00:28:26 -0400
From: "Justin Kraynack"
Subject: RE: FTE Small - O2 Sensor

Ryan,

If it ain't broke....you know. My O2 went at 158k on my 90 BII. When it
goes, you know very quickly. The "check engine" light will come on and the
motor will run very rough. The first time the light cam on, it went out
after about 2 minutes. Didn't happen again for about a week. Then became
more regular for another week. By the third week, the truck was running
terrible. I went to a national parts store and used their tester (which is
free at places like Wester Auto) and found that it was the O2. I found outh
that there were 4 different models made for that year, so I removed it first
and took it to a dealer. (By the way, to remove it...unplug it first! I
mutilated mine. The dealer asked me if I removed it with a hammer!) Total
cost was $95 and change. No problems since. If your truck isn't running
poorly, let the thing fail on it's own and save the bucks for a rainy day.
The worst that can happen is it'll run crappy until you replace it.

Justin

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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Apr 1999 21:47:42 -0700
From: "Robert Eberhardt"
Subject: RE: FTE Small - Super Chip

>Date: Wed, 28 Apr 1999 06:18:31 -0700
>From: Ray Scheidnes
>Subject: RE: FTE Small - Super Chip
>
>Do you simply pull off the original MAF and replace it with this larger
one?
>Are there any other parts that you need to make it fit correctly with the
>stock airbox?
>Did you notice any improvement in the motor's performance with this larger
>MAF?
>

I really couldn't tell any difference with it. I mainly purchased it with
the intentions of adding headers and a larger throttle body as I got to
them. I happened to sell my Ranger before I got to the rest. I purchased it
first per 4.0L Performance's advise. The guy that runs the shop said that it
was the most restrictive element on the intake side. He said the throttle
body was a larger diameter so it wouldn't have done any good to go even
larger since the airflow still had to make it through the restrictive stock
mass air meter. It bolts right in place of the stock one. It does take some
forcing to get it into the small openings but I put some Vaseline on both
ends to help it. Once I got it on the first time it went on and off much
easier the next time.

Robert

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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Apr 1999 21:54:14 -0700
From: "Ryan Miller"
Subject: RE: FTE Small - O2 Sensor (warning; long)

Tim, thanks for the excellent reply. I'll check it out, though I'm expecting
to have to replace it (only $50 and $9 for the socket).



>
> Essentially so in the automotive field, but by the time it runs bad
> enough for me to see 'em they're usually dead. On the sensors equipped
> with a heating element (HEGO) the heater can short to the sensor for a
> quick failure, but that's not the fault of the actual sensor tip. (What
> type of controls? My father does a lot of work with industrial
> pollution controls as a Chem E Ph.D.)
>

The company I work for designs controllers for produce storage (controls
humidity and temp for primarily potatoes and onions). We also build gas
analyzers for quality control in packaged produce, which is where the O2
sensors come in. If your bag of salad runs out of oxygen, it gets pretty
gross.




>
> >
> > Any help would be appreciated.
>
> Hope this was of some help. ;-)
>


It was! Thanks much.


Ryan

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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 30 Apr 1999 22:02:05 -0700
From: "Ryan Miller"
Subject: RE: FTE Small - O2 Sensor

I know; I'm mostly just chasing gas mileage clues. My truck is running fine,
but I would like to get the best mileage I can. That's why I was wondering
if the sensor could affect the mileage without triggering a code.

Ryan

>
> If it ain't broke....you know.



> If your truck isn't running
> poorly, let the thing fail on it's own and save the bucks for a rainy day.
> The worst that can happen is it'll run crappy until you replace it.
>
> Justin
>
> == FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html
>

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------------------------------

Date: Sun, 02 May 1999 01:42:18 -0500
From: Matthew Banevich
Subject: Re: FTE Small - 89' Bronco II Clutch

Well, I got the Transmission out today, my dad brought me a 2-3' long
extension with an universal joint at the end for the two top hidden
bolts, I took the clutch master cylinder and reservior out because I
couldn't get the quick release thing to work......

Now the problem is that there is a caked on oily substance all over the
outside and inside of the bell housing, the old pressure plate is oily,
and so is the old clutch, but the old clutch is worn down to the
rivets. So I know it still needs replacement. I can't tell whee this
oil is coming from, but it's all over the place, even on the top of the
trans where the shifter is, and even on that foam insert that is in that
shifter housing. I can't figure what it is, in some places it is black....


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