small-list-digest Saturday, November 21 1998 Volume 02 : Number 323



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Ford Truck Enthusiasts - Ranger, Explorer, Bronco 2 and Aerostar
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In this issue:

FTE Small - Bed weight for winter driving
Re: FTE Small - Bed weight for winter driving
FTE Small - Ranger Wheels
Re: FTE Small - Ranger Wheels
FTE Small - Re: Paint Restoration
Re: FTE Small - Bed weight for winter driving
FTE Small - lowering Ranger 4wd
Re: FTE Small - Bed weight for winter driving
Re: FTE Small - Bed weight for winter driving
FTE Small - 2.8 radiator fan noise ??
Re: FTE Small - lowering Ranger 4wd

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Date: Fri, 20 Nov 1998 08:14:00 -0500
From: "Patrick Frazer"
Subject: FTE Small - Bed weight for winter driving

Hi everyone,

Living in north central Ohio, I'm looking at another season of driving
in the evil white stuff. I bought my '95 Ranger XLT extended cab at the
end of last year's snow season, so I don't have a whole lot of
experience driving the truck in the snow. Here's my question:

What is an appropriate amount of weight to put over the rear axle to
help with driving on snow/ice? What effect does the added weight have
on stopping distance?

Thinking back to college physics, I'm concerned that adding weight will
increase traction a little, but increase the stopping distance more.
One could consider the extreme example -- imagine having a couple cords
of wood piled in the back. You'd get great traction, but you'd also
turn the truck into a giant curling puck if you ever got above 35 MPH on
a slick road.

Any thoughts?

- -Patrick


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Date: Fri, 20 Nov 1998 08:15:51 -0600
From: "peter lambert"
Subject: Re: FTE Small - Bed weight for winter driving

I have 300 lbs of bagged sand in my truck and the increased traction easily
outweighs any increased stopping distance. Actually I haven't noticed any
increased stopping distance.

Peter

"Keep the rubber side down"
1997 Ranger XLT
1986 Kawaski ZX1000R
- -----Original Message-----
From: Patrick Frazer
To: small-list ford-trucks.com
Date: Friday, November 20, 1998 7:16 AM
Subject: FTE Small - Bed weight for winter driving


>
>Hi everyone,
>
>Living in north central Ohio, I'm looking at another season of driving
>in the evil white stuff. I bought my '95 Ranger XLT extended cab at the
>end of last year's snow season, so I don't have a whole lot of
>experience driving the truck in the snow. Here's my question:
>
>What is an appropriate amount of weight to put over the rear axle to
>help with driving on snow/ice? What effect does the added weight have
>on stopping distance?
>
>Thinking back to college physics, I'm concerned that adding weight will
>increase traction a little, but increase the stopping distance more.
>One could consider the extreme example -- imagine having a couple cords
>of wood piled in the back. You'd get great traction, but you'd also
>turn the truck into a giant curling puck if you ever got above 35 MPH on
>a slick road.
>
>Any thoughts?
>
>-Patrick
>
>
>== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html
>

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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 20 Nov 1998 09:30:40 -0600 (CST)
From: Daniel Chace
Subject: FTE Small - Ranger Wheels

Just a simple question,

I have a 1993 Ranger 2WD with the 14" Aluminum wheels. Since I am needing new
tires and the clearcoat is wearing off I thought that it might be a good time to
shop around for some newer wheels. Does anyone know if the Ford 15" 5-spoke
teardrop style Aluminum wheels off of later model Rangers and Explorers will
fit? Will I have to adjust a speedometer gear or something to make up for the
larger size? Also, any tire recoomendations for this combination?

Sorry for the Cross post to anyone(sent to Fordnatics as well...)
Thanks in advance,

Dan

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Date: Fri, 20 Nov 1998 09:58:06 -0600
From: "Jim Karnes"
Subject: Re: FTE Small - Ranger Wheels

Check out this link for a Ranger with Explorer wheels.
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://members.aol.com/frangerman/mine.HTML


Jim Karnes
www.rangerpowersports.com
Ranger Power Sports - The Ranger PowerHouse of the Internet

- -----Original Message-----
From: Daniel Chace
To: small-list ford-trucks.com
Date: Friday, November 20, 1998 9:35 AM
Subject: FTE Small - Ranger Wheels


>
>Just a simple question,
>
>I have a 1993 Ranger 2WD with the 14" Aluminum wheels. Since I am needing
new
>tires and the clearcoat is wearing off I thought that it might be a good
time to
>shop around for some newer wheels. Does anyone know if the Ford 15"
5-spoke
>teardrop style Aluminum wheels off of later model Rangers and Explorers
will
>fit? Will I have to adjust a speedometer gear or something to make up for
the
>larger size? Also, any tire recoomendations for this combination?
>
>Sorry for the Cross post to anyone(sent to Fordnatics as well...)
>Thanks in advance,
>
>Dan
>
>== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 20 Nov 1998 10:41:35 -0600
From: "John Cheyney RN, BSN, CCRN"
Subject: FTE Small - Re: Paint Restoration

>

>> Date: Wed, 18 Nov 1998 12:52:06 -0500


>> What do you find is the best product for restoring the luster

>> to a fading

>> paint job...


I use Meguiar's products on my 1993 Ranger. They are slightly more expensive than others but (I think) well worth it. One thing I learned is the different between a polish and a wax. A wax is only there to protect the paint from external contaminants. The purpose of the polish is to return oils to the paint. I use the polish as an extra step and it is very obvious the difference it makes. I also (just recently) used Turtle Wax polishing compound to remove some spray paint over spray and it worked well. Meguiar's has a web site (www.meguiars.com). It is, of course, biased towards its own products but has some very good information.

John Cheyney RN, BSN, BA, CCRN

1213 McHam

Irving, Texas

75062


Email: cheyne19 idt.net

jcheyn childmed.dallas.tx.us


"For I know the plans I have for you," declares the Lord, "plans to
prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future."

Jeremiah 29:11
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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 20 Nov 1998 11:58:20 -0500
From: "Anthony Rifici"
Subject: Re: FTE Small - Bed weight for winter driving

I am from Northeast Ohio near the lake (Mentor) and drive a '94 Ranger
Supercab, so I can appreciate your situation. I put 300lbs of gravel (6
50lb bags) over the rear axle. Stopping distance seems unaffected and gas
mileage dips slightly. The added weight may actually help you stop for the
same reason it helps you go. It will, slightly, better the weight
distribution and shift the centroid of the trucks weight, in high speed
braking, more rearward than without added weight. This means more force
over the rear axle, making the rear brakes more effective. I don't know if
95s had 4 wheel antilock, but my 94 only has rear antilock, which is almost
worthless, but every bit helps.
Since you say your inexperienced, I'll stress that weight had better not be
able to move. Imagine rounding an ice covered turn and 300lbs goes flying
to a corner in the back of the bed. Instant spin. I have found that a
"load locking" bedliner works very well for this. These bedliners have
sleeves in the sides for 2x4or6s. Placing a 2x4 in the sleeve just forward
and just behind the wheelwells creates a space over the axle that is almost
exactly the size of 6 50lb bags of gravel. This secures the load over the
axle very well (unless of course you hit someone).
Knowing how winters are in northern Ohio, I would strongly suggest taking
your truck to an empty parking lot early in the morning after a good
snowfall and gaining some experience with how your truck behaves in the
snow/ice.

Good Luck,
Tony
'94 Ranger Supercab, 4.0L, 5-Speed

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Date: Fri, 20 Nov 1998 09:46:45 -0800 (PST)
From: "Bernie K."
Subject: FTE Small - lowering Ranger 4wd

Has anyone looked into the complexities involved in dropping a 4x4 98 Ranger
just 2-3"? I wish the factory wouldn't have lifted it quite as much for
folks like myself who need 4wd traction, but not the high off road clearance.
Thanks,
George in Ky..

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Date: Fri, 20 Nov 1998 11:37:36 -0700
From: BJ Tiemessen
Subject: Re: FTE Small - Bed weight for winter driving

I don't think that you have to worry about increased stopping distance with
more weight. I learned in physics that a Freightliner will stop faster than
a Geo. It is hard to believe but we tested and proved it (but not with
cars). And another thing, if you want to stop DON'T count on ABS. ABS was
invented for stupid people. Have you ever heard of threshold breaking?
This is where you hold your brakes at the point just before they lock up.
That is your ultimate braking point and you will still be able to turn. It
takes practice though, I learned in a class on a skid pad. I only have rear
ABS and the time that I didn't use threshold breaking and tried to use my
ABS I ended up at the side of a steep ditch and the truck was lying on the
drivers side. Through all that I just got 3 dents smaller than my palm, I
love this truck.

BJ
96 Ranger

Patrick Frazer wrote:

> Hi everyone,
>
> Living in north central Ohio, I'm looking at another season of driving
> in the evil white stuff. I bought my '95 Ranger XLT extended cab at the
> end of last year's snow season, so I don't have a whole lot of
> experience driving the truck in the snow. Here's my question:
>
> What is an appropriate amount of weight to put over the rear axle to
> help with driving on snow/ice? What effect does the added weight have
> on stopping distance?
>
> Thinking back to college physics, I'm concerned that adding weight will
> increase traction a little, but increase the stopping distance more.
> One could consider the extreme example -- imagine having a couple cords
> of wood piled in the back. You'd get great traction, but you'd also
> turn the truck into a giant curling puck if you ever got above 35 MPH on
> a slick road.
>
> Any thoughts?
>
> -Patrick
>
> == FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 20 Nov 1998 18:02:04 -0500
From: "Jerry Dean"
Subject: Re: FTE Small - Bed weight for winter driving

I put a 3/8" Thick piece of Steel in the bed of my work truck. I cut it to
fit between the wheel wells and run the length of the bed. About 300 or so
pounds and I don't loose any room in the bed!

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Date: Fri, 20 Nov 98 19:03:26 EST
From: CONAN RALVM8.VNET.IBM.COM
Subject: FTE Small - 2.8 radiator fan noise ??

Is there a good fix for a terribly noisy radiator fan on an '83 2.8?
I'm told "they were all like that". ;-)
(I replaced the clutch unit, or whatever it uses, a while back and that
did not help.)
Ed in Raleigh NC
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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 20 Nov 1998 23:46:34 -0600 (CST)
From: Diana Slyter
Subject: Re: FTE Small - lowering Ranger 4wd

I am none to happy with the excess height of my 98 Ranger 4x4 also. I
haven't attemped any lowering, but it looks like the rear spring spacers
could be removed and the front torsion bars adjusted to produce about a 2
inch drop.

- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
dianas __ __ ____ ___ ___ ____
dianas primenet.com /__)/__) / / / / /_ /\ / /_ /
/ / \ / / / / /__ / \/ /___ /-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

On Fri, 20 Nov 1998, Bernie K. wrote:

> Has anyone looked into the complexities involved in dropping a 4x4 98 Ranger
> just 2-3"? I wish the factory wouldn't have lifted it quite as much for
> folks like myself who need 4wd traction, but not the high off road clearance.
> Thanks,
....


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