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Date: Thu, 11 Sep 1997 20:00:47 -0600 (MDT)
From: owner-fordtrucks-digest ListService.net (fordtrucks-digest)
To: fordtrucks-digest ListService.net
Subject: fordtrucks-digest V1 #211
Reply-To: fordtrucks ListService.net
Sender: owner-fordtrucks-digest ListService.net


fordtrucks-digest Thursday, September 11 1997 Volume 01 : Number 211



=======================================================================
Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1979 And Older Trucks Digest
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=======================================================================
In this issue:

RE: 2WD to 4WD Conversion ["Gary, 78 BBB" ]
F250 4X4 conversion [AM14 chrysler.com]
Re: electronic ignition ["Gary, 78 BBB" ]
Re: 460 Crank Failure ["Gary, 78 BBB" ]
Re: 2WD to 4WD Conversion ["deconblu" ]
RE: 2WD to 4WD Conversion [Sleddog ]
King Pins [Tom Hogan ]
RE: 2WD to 4WD Conversion ["Gary, 78 BBB" ]
RE: 2WD to 4WD Conversion [Randy Collins ]
Factory Spot Light Bulb [shoman p3.net]
Re: King Pins ["Gary, 78 BBB" ]
Re: Converting my 66 and my 74 to Halogen Headlights [marko helix.net (ma]
Re: electronic ignition [marko helix.net (marko maryniak)]
Re: King Pins [marko helix.net (marko maryniak)]
Seat Cover sources [jack fleming ]
Re: electronic ignition ["RICH ANZALONE" ]
RE: King Pins [DC Beatty ]
Thanks For the Info!! ["Don & Teresa Neighbors" ]

=======================================================================

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Thu, 11 Sep 1997 07:49:00 +0000
From: "Gary, 78 BBB"
Subject: RE: 2WD to 4WD Conversion

> From: Keith Srb
> Subject: RE: 2WD to 4WD Conversion
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 1997 15:41:08 -0700

> about rust. I do not care how long, or how much money it will take
> to do the restoration and upgrades. Other than the fact that it is
> 2WD, I love this truck and have no plans of ever selling it.

This is all fine and we agree with the concept of doing a good job
but why reinvent the wheel and come up with an inferior design on top
of it all? The stock 4x4 frame is already very well designed and set
up for your purpose. If you modify the frame of your 2wd it's no
longer a historic part any way and it's vin number will be
meaningless so why be concerned about keeping it? Instead why not
box and reinforce the 4x4 frame and do a fine job on that without the
extra effort of converting it? Especially since the money doesn't
seem to be a problem?

Don't misunderstand, I'm not putting you down because you want to do
this and it may even be a good learning experience but you can get a
lot of experience and pleasure from modifying a properly designed 4x4
frame to your own exacting standards too, and in the end It's my
sincere belief that you will be more satisfied with the results :-)
I did the van on a shoe string and thought I couldn't really afford a
4x4 frame anyway so I did what I had to to get it done but it was not
my first choice, believe me :-)

As I said I did this but afterward realized I would have been MUCH
further ahead to use a 4x4 frame and make what ever mods I needed to
fit the van body to it and would have had a better handling vehicle
to boot. (although it did handle pretty well anyway)

The swift of foot and slow of wit
have more off road experiences

- -- Gary --

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 11 Sep 97 08:23:05 EDT
From: AM14 chrysler.com
Subject: F250 4X4 conversion

Keith Srb:

We understand. What we think you don't understand is the major differences in
the two frames. The 2wd and the 4wd frames have almost nothing in common. All
pre '78 F 250 4X4's had a divorced transfercase (not bolted to the
transmission), and this required several differences for mounting the 4X4
driveline. It can be done, but what the group is trying to say is that you are
creating an abundance of work for yourself and some of it, if done correctly,
has to be very precisely placed or your vehicle will not track properly.
(hanging the front leaf springs for the front axle). Also the divorced
transfer case has a special crossmember for mounting and another for bracing.
It would be much easier to find a 4X4 frame/driveline and install your
cab/bed. I've done this a couple of times. Not much to it this way.

Good luck, whichever way you choose.

WORKING TO BE THE BEST
Azie Magnusson_07910 Huntsville, Al.
PROFS ID (AM14):E-Mail AM14 Chrysler.com
Tie Line (835-2578):Outside (205)464-2578

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 11 Sep 1997 08:54:10 +0000
From: "Gary, 78 BBB"
Subject: Re: electronic ignition

> From: "RICH ANZALONE"
> Subject: electronic ignition
> Date: Thu, 11 Sep 1997 00:48:32 PDT

> I had electronic ignition installed in my truck about a week ago and
> I drove it to work for the first time yesterday. My problem is the

Desctibe the ignition for us. Is it the stock dura spark? If so
what vintage/model? Was it recurved by anyone? Does it use a vac?


The swift of foot and slow of wit
have more off road experiences

- -- Gary --

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 11 Sep 1997 09:17:07 +0000
From: "Gary, 78 BBB"
Subject: Re: 460 Crank Failure

> From: "Dale and Donna Carmine"
> Subject: 460 Crank Failure
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 1997 18:00:50 -0500

> wouldn't turn at all. The mechanic who rebuilt the 460 said he has
> seen this before. He said it is caused by regrinders who don't put
> enough radius at the edge of the main journals causing a stress
> point. Has anyone else seen this type of failure? How common is it?

It would seem that torsion wise the front would be less suseptible
but the damper is on the front and could, as sledog said, be doing
something. The mechanic was correct. The radius needs to be as
large and scratch free as possible without interfering with the
bearings to prevent stress concentrations. Nodular cranks are forged
as far as I know but still made of cast iron with a very high carbon
content which means easily cracked if any stress lines are formed in
the machining or left over from the forging operation.

Ford uses two grades of nodular iron in the cranks, one for high
performance with a higher nodularity and higher Brinell hardness spec
and the other for standard production. Racers use steel billet
cranks which have much better resiliance than cast iron so don't
crack as easily. (and are lighter as well)

Another possibility is that the engine was subjected to some severe
axial pounding which will fracture the front portion of the crank. I
once heard of an engine involved in a rear collision which caused the
front of the crank to pop right off. It was not directly hit but the
axial forces coupled with torsional while spinning apparently
fractured it right behind the damper.

The swift of foot and slow of wit
have more off road experiences

- -- Gary --

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 11 Sep 1997 07:50:45 -0700
From: "deconblu"
Subject: Re: 2WD to 4WD Conversion

>> From: Keith Srb
>> Subject: RE: 2WD to 4WD Conversion
>> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 1997 15:41:08 -0700
>
>> about rust. I do not care how long, or how much money it will take
>> to do the restoration and upgrades. Other than the fact that it is
>> 2WD, I love this truck and have no plans of ever selling it.

Have you thought of something 2wd radical off road? Lift your '74 get some
off road wheels and tires (duels on the rear would be hot) Have a truck with
a personality all it's own. Not to mention you keep even more of the
original '74. Just a little thought vomit, you know something in the back of
my head that came up unexpectedly!




Deacon Blues
deconblu gte.net
'73 F100 302

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 11 Sep 1997 11:03:44 -0400
From: Sleddog
Subject: RE: 2WD to 4WD Conversion

the prerunner truck is a awesome way to build a 2wd.
but, if you want that 4wd, using the 2wd chassis, then go right ahead. i
am sure that everyone on this list will help as much as we can with the
swap. i know people who have done it - and liked the final outcome. but
why not build using f350 4wd parts, or f150 radius arms and 3/4 or 1 ton
front axle? (the f150 front setup is most likely easier to swap, and IMHO
works better. just curious...

sleddog

- ----------
From: deconblu[SMTP:deconblu gte.net]
Sent: Thursday, September 11, 1997 10:50 AM
To: fordtrucks ListService.net
Subject: Re: 2WD to 4WD Conversion

>> From: Keith Srb
>> Subject: RE: 2WD to 4WD Conversion
>> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 1997 15:41:08 -0700
>
>> about rust. I do not care how long, or how much money it will take
>> to do the restoration and upgrades. Other than the fact that it is
>> 2WD, I love this truck and have no plans of ever selling it.

Have you thought of something 2wd radical off road? Lift your '74 get some
off road wheels and tires (duels on the rear would be hot) Have a truck
with
a personality all it's own. Not to mention you keep even more of the
original '74. Just a little thought vomit, you know something in the back
of
my head that came up unexpectedly!




Deacon Blues
deconblu gte.net
'73 F100 302











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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 11 Sep 1997 08:41:49 -0700
From: Tom Hogan
Subject: King Pins

Question; How can I tell if the king pins on my truck (76 2wd F-150)
need to be replaced without taking it to a shop? How hard are they to
replace? How do you remove the top and bottom caps? If the truck has
plastic bushings can they be replace with metal bushings?
If it's too difficult I would take it to a shop but I would like to know
that they are shot before I go in.
You know, "Mr grease monkey, do I need major, expensive front end work?"
(sniff)"Duh why yeah, yeah you shure do!!" (scratch, belch mumble)
"expensive" (mumble) "can't put it off" (mumble, scratch, Bill the Cat
noises) "might loose control"
"Mr grease monkey, shouldn't you look at the truck first .....?"

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 11 Sep 1997 12:04:11 +0000
From: "Gary, 78 BBB"
Subject: RE: 2WD to 4WD Conversion

> From: Sleddog
> Subject: RE: 2WD to 4WD Conversion
> Date: Thu, 11 Sep 1997 11:03:44 -0400

> radius arms and 3/4 or 1 ton front axle? (the f150 front setup is
> most likely easier to swap, and IMHO works better. just curious...

I always thought the leaf spring would be easier to do since all you
do is bolt the brackets to the frame and it's done, no track bar, no
radius arms etc. but never done it so don't know for sure? I think
the coils give a little better ride but not real sure about that
either, just what I've heard :-)

The swift of foot and slow of wit
have more off road experiences

- -- Gary --

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 11 Sep 1997 10:12:21 -0700
From: Randy Collins
Subject: RE: 2WD to 4WD Conversion

Keith,

My project truck is a 2WD to 4WD conversion. Although it isn't done yet
the running gear portion of the project is complete.

I am absolutely positive that it will go down the road straight.

I converted a 1975 F250 supercab 2WD to 4 wheel drive. I took a little
different approach to what I have read.

For my project I purchased 2 trucks. The 1975 2WD supercab and a 1977 1/2
(which is basically a 1978 F250 4WD). I brought both of the trucks home
and I spent a week measuring and contemplating my options. It came down to
2 options:

1) Lengthen the 4WD frame to accommodate the longer Supercab.
2) Remove the front frame rails from the 4WD and weld them to the 2WD
frame.

I chose option #2. Cut the frame rails from the 4WD and weld them to the
2WD.

I have to say that it was a lot of work but all went as planned and I
didn't have anything unexpected happen. You also must understand that a
project of this magnitude is way out of the normal scope of my typical w
eekend projects. I attribute a great deal of this project to watching too
many of those tool time episodes.

If anyone is interested in the details of this project drop me a note and I
will fill you in.

Randy Collins
Boise, Idaho
rcollins micron.net

1975 Ford F250 4WD Supercab "Muscle Truck"
Soon to have the following Randy installed options:
460 C-6

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 11 Sep 1997 12:10:20 -0400
From: shoman p3.net
Subject: Factory Spot Light Bulb

I'm looking for the Bulb that goes into the spotlight(searchlight)
for my 68 f-100..Also how common is this option???
joe

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 11 Sep 1997 12:30:53 +0000
From: "Gary, 78 BBB"
Subject: Re: King Pins

> From: Tom Hogan
> Subject: King Pins
> Date: Thu, 11 Sep 1997 08:41:49 -0700

> Question; How can I tell if the king pins on my truck (76 2wd F-150)
> need to be replaced without taking it to a shop? How hard are they
> to replace? How do you remove the top and bottom caps? If the truck
> has plastic bushings can they be replace with metal bushings? If

They are tough to change without some equipment. I often have used
the torch to get things to move but a heavy duty air chisle would do
if you have one. Mine isn't heavy enough so I use a 4# sledge. I've
seen different types of cap so I can't help (can't remember anyway)
but that's the easy part. Take the tapered bolt out of the side and
start pounding :-(

To check them you can heat them up a little with a small torch to
melt the grease, but not too much in case they are plastic, just
enough to soften the grease, then re-grease them to get them cleaned
out. Heating first ensures that all the dried, old grease will be
washed out by the new. Be carefull not to flame the lower
thrust bearing seal. Now jack up the "I" beam so the wheel is
hanging off the floor and use a pry bar to try to induce movement in
the pin yoke up and down and side ways (after it cools). If it
doesn't move much just do a good clean grease job and you will see a
distinct difference in the tracking. If the play is observable with
your eye it might be a good idea to replace them. Plastic can be
done without reaming but the bronze must be reamed and not be a high
school kid working part time either, it's precision work and requires
patience to size it right.

Many people replace king pins when the vehicle won't track assuming
they are loose but more often the grease is dried out and won't allow
the steering arm to fall back to center easily keeping it slighly off
center and requiring many small steering adjustments continuously to
keep it straight so make sure it's free first as mentioned above :-)

The swift of foot and slow of wit
have more off road experiences

- -- Gary --

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 09 Sep 1997 10:03:37 -0700
From: marko helix.net (marko maryniak)
Subject: Re: Converting my 66 and my 74 to Halogen Headlights

>marko maryniak wrote:
>
>I was wondering if you could help me out with this? When you say they
>don't blink does that mean the regulator might be what is causing my
>lights to pulsate noticeably and using an electronic one could solve it?

You wanna check your battery too. Does it hold a charge okay? Seems like,
if you aren't complaining about starting problems.

Therefore, my answer is "More than likely". The way an electromechanical
regulator works is just like a headlight relay or something, pretty much,
except the points are pulled OPEN and let go to close, rather than in the
case of a headlight relay where they're pulled shut. What happens is,
there's a spring on a set of points in your regulator, and a coil. These
points open and close essentially turning on and off the flow of current
from alternator to battery. When the voltage drops past a certain point,
the magnetic force of the coil isn't enough to pull the points open, so they
stay shut and let current thru. When the voltage builds up to, say, 13.5 or
so, the coil pulls hard on the points and opens them to keep the battery
from overcharging.

You can pop the top off your regulator (actually it uses two small screws as
I recall) and look at how it works. It's called electomechanical because
the electricity mechanically moves a set of points.

After awhile the points wear down, the coil loses its efficiency (the copper
in the wires corrodes or whatever), the spring weakens, and it takes more
current to move the points one way or the other. So the range between "on"
and "off" gets wider and your electrical system pulsates cause the regulator
can't open and close properly.

The electronic regulator has exactly the same base, but the top part (wish I
could draw here) is smaller, as there's no point mechanism. This noticably
reduces the range between open and closed, as it is made to be very
sensitive to changes in voltage.
>
>> They have the same plug and the same size housing, just are not as tall (no
>> coil to accommodate). And they're cheap, available even at Wal-Mart.
>
>So when I go to Wal-Mart or wherever and the guy at the parts counter
>needs the year and model of the vehicle what should I tell him. Is
>there a certain year that Ford started using electronic?
>
At my friendly (very friendly!) neighbourhood walmart, in the automotive
section there's a display with spark plugs, wires, caps, etc. Hanging among
those items are "generic" ignition boxes for Fords and voltage regulators,
etc. Also for D*dges and (cough) Ch*vys. You don't have to ask the guy at
the parts counter, just walk up to this display, and look in the
cross-reference guide. I think there's only one regulator for ALL fords
from like 73 to 89 or something, cars and trucks alike. It's about 20 bucks.

You see, once somebody came up with the idea of an electronic regulator,
they just stopped making the electromechanical ones. They made it the same
so you could retrofit it. So even if '74s came with electromechanical
regulators, the replacement part in 1997 is an electronic one. Nobody sells
the old style ones anymore.

>I really would appreciate some info because I want to fix the pulsating
>lights. I have had people pull up next to me on the road and inform me
>of my "problem". I had assumed it must be something I had to hunt down
>in the wiring.

Last thing: the regulator mounts on the rad support as I recall, on the
passenger side.

Make sure you have decent ground there (check with an ohmmeter between the
negative post of the battery and the rad support, shud show zero ohms, or
with a test light, which shud burn brightly between the positive post of the
battery and grounded to the rad support where the regulator is). A floating
ground can also cause the regulator to malfunction.

Good luck

marko in vancouver
71 f250 4x4

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 09 Sep 1997 10:19:17 -0700
From: marko helix.net (marko maryniak)
Subject: Re: electronic ignition

>I had electronic ignition installed in my truck about a week ago and I
>drove it to work for the first time yesterday. My problem is the motor
>started pinging really bad on the way home. I live at about 3500 feet
>of elevation and my work is at about 500 foot. It quit pinging by the
>time I got home so I ruled out bad gas. I didn't have this problem
>before I swapped to the electronic ignition. Any Ideas on what the
>problem might be? Thanks for any and all ideas.
>
>Rich Anzalone 75 F100 (390)
>

Sounds like they just set the timing a little too early. They woulda had to
take out the distributor (probly) to do the switch so they probably timed it
too far before tdc. Also check if your vacuum advance (really a misnomer,
shud be called a vacuum retard/delay, cause that's what it is) is properly
hooked up and functioning (pop the cap off, pull the hose off the carb, and
suck on the hose watching if the thing moves. Then stick your tongue on the
end of the hose to see if the thing stays or if it leaks down. If it leaks
down it's no good).

Since you drove all the way home uphill (significantly, unless you live 3000
miles from work) it's having your foot in it the consequent drop in vacuum
that causes that leads me to suspect it's your timing. You didn't say it
pinged on the way TO work....


marko in vancouver
marko helix.net
71 f250 4x4

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 09 Sep 1997 10:21:49 -0700
From: marko helix.net (marko maryniak)
Subject: Re: King Pins

>Question; How can I tell if the king pins on my truck (76 2wd F-150)
>need to be replaced without taking it to a shop? How hard are they to
>replace? How do you remove the top and bottom caps? If the truck has
>plastic bushings can they be replace with metal bushings?
>If it's too difficult I would take it to a shop but I would like to know
>that they are shot before I go in.

Jack up your front end.

Then take each wheel at the top and bottom, and shake it to see if it moves
(top in bottom out, or top out bottom in). If not, then your kingpins are
okay.

Make sure by watching that it's not your wheel bearings that are loose.


marko in vancouver
marko helix.net
71 f250 4x4

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 11 Sep 1997 20:11:43 -0400
From: jack fleming
Subject: Seat Cover sources

Could some of you folks recommend possible sources of upholstery kits =
for my '54 F100? I've removed the previous owners' "attempt" at a =
custom, hot-rod style interior (2 non-descript bucket seats sitting on =
2x4s atop a welded base) and have purchased an original bench seat - =
however it is in desperate need of new covering, spring reconditioning, =
etc. I've only found one source so far; CI in Mass.....I called them 3 =
weeks ago, they promised a catalogue, but no word yet......

Thanks in advance
Jack
'54 F 100

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 11 Sep 1997 18:52:29 PDT
From: "RICH ANZALONE"
Subject: Re: electronic ignition

>Date: Tue, 09 Sep 1997 10:19:17 -0700
>To: fordtrucks listservice.net
>From: marko helix.net (marko maryniak)
>Subject: Re: electronic ignition
>

>
>Sounds like they just set the timing a little too early. They woulda
had to
>take out the distributor (probly) to do the switch so they probably
timed it
>too far before tdc.

yes they did take out the distributor. the electronic egnition module
was already in the truck when I bought it and it has no markings.

Also check if your vacuum advance (really a misnomer,
>shud be called a vacuum retard/delay, cause that's what it is) is
properly
>hooked up and functioning (pop the cap off, pull the hose off the carb,
and

snip*
the vacum advance seems to be working.

>
>Since you drove all the way home uphill (significantly, unless you live
3000
>miles from work) it's having your foot in it the consequent drop in
vacuum
>that causes that leads me to suspect it's your timing. You didn't say
it
>pinged on the way TO work....
>
>
>marko in vancouver
>marko helix.net
>71 f250 4x4
>

no it didn't ping on the way to work and I only live about 40 miles from
work. thanks for the help I'll check the timing this weekend and let
you know.

Rich Anzalone 75 F100 (390)


______________________________________________________

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 11 Sep 1997 21:59:52 -0400
From: DC Beatty
Subject: RE: King Pins

How much play is considered acceptable in king pins? I imagine that there=

needs to be some space in there for the grease to fill up. =


I ask because my truck seems to be wandering a bit. The truck sat for a
long time and the kingpins were pretty dry. I checked them and there was
just a tiny bit of movement in them, maybe .010" or less. The guy at the
alignment shop just told me to grease them as they hadn't been greased in=

awhile. I use the real heavy black Valvoline Supreme grease (part # 632),=

because I hear that this heavy grease is desirable in Ford stuff. =


Could I need a steering gear adjustment? The steering coupler is in good
shape, and the front end is passable. =


Thanks for any ideas,

DC Beatty
1967 F100 352
1974 Maverick 302

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 11 Sep 1997 22:07:54 -0400
From: "Don & Teresa Neighbors"
Subject: Thanks For the Info!!

Ask, and ye shall receive!
Well, I wanted some suggestions on 1 12 volt conversion for my '54, and I
got them! Since there were a number of ideas from more than a few, thanks
to all involved. Mr. Meier answered my biggest concern, what the reversed
polarity would do to the starter. I already knew that 12 volts fed to a 6
volt starter would be okay, since that's a fairly common practice among the
vintage VW crowd. As for alternator vs. generator, if the generator
doesn't need brushes more than once in a couple of years, I call that....


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