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Date: Mon, 1 Sep 1997 23:22:13 -0600 (MDT)
From: owner-fordtrucks-digest ListService.net (fordtrucks-digest)
To: fordtrucks-digest ListService.net
Subject: fordtrucks-digest V1 #182
Reply-To: fordtrucks ListService.net
Sender: owner-fordtrucks-digest ListService.net


fordtrucks-digest Monday, September 1 1997 Volume 01 : Number 182



=======================================================================
Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1979 And Older Trucks Digest
Visit our web site: http://www.ford-trucks.com/
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
To unsubscribe, send email to:
fordtrucks-digest-request listservice.net
with the word "unsubscribe" in the body of the message. For help, send
email to the same address with the word "help" in the body of the
message.
=======================================================================
In this issue:

Re: fordtrucks-digest V1 #181 [Schottsweb webtv.net (George Schott)]
T-10 trans. [Schottsweb webtv.net (George Schott)]
Re: Electrolisis derusting process [OldTrux aol.com]
Re: fordtrucks-digest V1 #181 [OldTrux aol.com]
73-79 pickup ammeter [Tom Hogan ]
Murphy's Law [reedg ns2.cetlink.net]
Re: List breakdown. [Ken Payne ]
Corrosion Control [JSanc82344 aol.com]
Re: Murphy's Law [Ken Payne ]
Re: Electrolisis derusting process [Ken Payne ]
Re: Which Welder?? ["Brett McCoy" ]
Re: Murphy's Law ["George Shepherd" ]
Re: Which Welder?? [canzus seanet.com]
302 front cover ["Mark Mech" ]
Re: Which Welder?? [sdelanty sonic.net]
Re:digest V1 #180/Welders... [sdelanty sonic.net]
Re: Which Welder?? ["Deacon Blue" ]
Re: List breakdown. [HYDROSMITH aol.com]
Duraspark II [danadeb pacbell.net]
Re: 302 front cover ["Donald R. Screen" ]
re:electrolisis ["The Gautschi Family" ]

=======================================================================

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Mon, 1 Sep 1997 17:39:43 -0400
From: Schottsweb webtv.net (George Schott)
Subject: Re: fordtrucks-digest V1 #181

Well Don nothing really says that .023 is better than .030 or .035 or
even .045 for that matter I was simply going by what was needed for the
application .023 for sheetmetal work .030 for 1/8 to 3/16 .035 to 3/8
and .045 for 1/2 and greater if you want to be technical that is.

Duke's
Fine 69

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 1 Sep 1997 17:43:00 -0400
From: Schottsweb webtv.net (George Schott)
Subject: T-10 trans.

I think someone brought this up but I lost it. would a T-10 trans. be a
bolt in on a 69 F-100 which has a 3 spd. in it now?

Duke's
Fine 69

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 1 Sep 1997 19:33:50 -0400 (EDT)
From: OldTrux aol.com
Subject: Re: Electrolisis derusting process

I too would like to hear about this process....

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 1 Sep 1997 20:37:43 -0400 (EDT)
From: OldTrux aol.com
Subject: Re: fordtrucks-digest V1 #181

Can a welder that is sold as a 030 wire feed be fed 024 wire with no other
changes?

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 1 Sep 1997 17:44:49 -0700
From: Tom Hogan
Subject: 73-79 pickup ammeter

Well I've figured out why most ammeters don't work on these pickups.
later Broncos (78-79) might be included (if they have a similar looking
dash). Basically these trucks have a shunt type ammeter. The current
flows thru the meter in this case. In earlier Broncos they had the loop
type ammeter. Ford put a shunt in the wiring harnes to carry the bulk
of the current from the alternator. The problem is that the resistance
of that shunt is too low ( zero ohms?) to direct any current to the
ammeter. Try putting an ammeter in an electric circuit and then connect
a straight wire across the leads and see what you read on the meter. I
have found the shunt's location in the harness and I need a piece of
resistor wire to put in there .01 to .02 ohms per foot or similar. If
anyone knows where I can get some of this please let me know.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 1 Sep 1997 21:08:09 +0000
From: reedg ns2.cetlink.net
Subject: Murphy's Law

I'm not going into all the things that went wrong with this engine
swap, but the last thing that went wrong was when the engine hoist
bent a leg and the 460 came tumbling down. Please let me know that
I'm not the only one that has problems when I try to do something
like this.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 01 Sep 1997 21:37:26 -0400
From: Ken Payne
Subject: Re: List breakdown.

At 11:36 AM 9/1/97 -0700, you wrote:
>Why don't we go ahead and have everyone participate in little
>information gathering. Lets have a tally of how many and what years
>trucks we own, and break down the list accordingly. There could be a
>page set up that only the members can enter what year trucks we have and
>it would keep a running total. There might be a higher number of truck
>from say 67-72 and that would require a list break at 66 and older, who
>knows.
>
>I would hate to see a list like 1920's and older and have only two
>people in it.
>
>So far I see the list going this way.
>
>1. 80 and up(I don't keep up on this list much so it might need to be
>broken up also)
>
>2. 57-79
> a. 67-79
> b. 57-66
>
>If there is really a need to break this down further go with a and b
>
>3. 56 and older.
>
>Just my HO.
>--

If we went strickly by numbers, the 1980+ list would be the
most likely candidate for a split. It surpassed the 1979-
group in number of members earlier this last week. However,
the 79- list sees at least 3x more messages posted.

I'm planning on having a survey form on the web site up within a
week, along with email instructions for those who don't have
form compatible browsers. By using a form we get a consistant
and easy to read outline of our membership. Like the last
survey (which I foolishly deleted the results a couple weeks
later), it will survey by year, model and engine family.
Additionally, it will have city, state and country listed.

I think its best to keep the actual survey off the list as last
time I had over 200 responses in 4 days (and we had 1/3 as many
members). This time I'll keep the results on the web site
and ask members to fill out the survey when they join.
Right now I'm testing an on-line survey/voting CGI script. This
script keeps a real-time running total available with password
protection (password will be given out to everyone via the lists).

The survey form will also have 2-3 alternative lists/cut-off
dates. The one with the highest amount will get voted on.

Ken

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 1 Sep 1997 21:38:54 -0400 (EDT)
From: JSanc82344 aol.com
Subject: Corrosion Control

I have just started the process of painting a 1956 F-100. Can anybody advise
me what are the best methods used to get rid of corrosion before or while
priming? Are there any products that eliminate rust effectively? This truck
has been abandoned for several years and is full of rust. Particularly the
door bottom edges, the hood on the inside, the cab top edges, and the bottom
corners of the cab. Any advise will be greatly appreciated.

Joe

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 01 Sep 1997 22:00:06 -0400
From: Ken Payne
Subject: Re: Murphy's Law

At 09:08 PM 9/1/97 +0000, you wrote:
>I'm not going into all the things that went wrong with this engine
>swap, but the last thing that went wrong was when the engine hoist
>bent a leg and the 460 came tumbling down. Please let me know that
>I'm not the only one that has problems when I try to do something
>like this.

I changed my truck over to disc brakes not because I wanted them
(I did), but because I damaged the spindle on the drum system
while trying to remove a stuck bearing. I now know the proper
way to remove spindle bearings!

A month ago I helped a friend change his over to disc brakes.
After carefully measuring and bending all the steel lines and
hooking it all together, it became apparent we had the front and
rear brake circuits crossed when we started to bleed it.

Or having a hell of a time trying to get a smooth idle only to
kick myself for having the distributor off by on gear tooth
(dooh!!).

Or the time (with my last truck) I was taking off the water pump
and I ended up with the wrench handle sticking into my radiator
when it slipped.

You're not alone!
Ken

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 01 Sep 1997 22:02:11 -0400
From: Ken Payne
Subject: Re: Electrolisis derusting process

At 09:10 AM 9/1/97 -0600, you wrote:
>Hi All,
>
>I've been cleaning up the original wheels from my 61 Unibody, and have
>used a process called Electrolisis which removes ALL rust right down to
>a beautiful light gray bare metal.
>This process doesn't damage the metal in any way like grinding or
>sandblasting does.
>It's also cheap!
>
>I was wondering if I should post a "how to" to the list?
>
>L8tr
>Bill Adams
>
>Let me know what you think.
>

Go for it! If its anything like the methods for chroming it ought
to be fairly simple.

Ken

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 1 Sep 1997 21:31:27 -0500
From: "Brett McCoy"
Subject: Re: Which Welder??

>George Said

>Bret,
>I weld everyday for a living what you need is a wire feed mig machine
>and use .023 wire also make sure you get the correct contact tips. This
>is going to be your best choice it's easy light weight and very
>versital.

Well I already took the small arch welder back. Just figured that I would
want something better some day. Now I just have to wait to get the money
for the MIG or Wire feed. Here is the next question. Why not just get a
flux core wire feed? I seem to recall something about not being able to
use a MIG welder outside if it is windy. Is this true? Do the flux core
wire feed welders have the same problem? Any other opinions on this from
anyone else?

- -B

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 1 Sep 1997 21:15:48 -0500
From: "George Shepherd"
Subject: Re: Murphy's Law

My 351 in the 81 Bronco has a big dent in the oil pan from the same malady.

- ----------
> From: reedg ns2.cetlink.net
> To: fordtrucks ListService.net
> Subject: Murphy's Law
> Date: Monday, September 01, 1997 4:08 PM
>
> I'm not going into all the things that went wrong with this engine
> swap, but the last thing that went wrong was when the engine hoist
> bent a leg and the 460 came tumbling down. Please let me know that
> I'm not the only one that has problems when I try to do something
> like this.
> +-------------- Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1979 and Older --------------+
> | Send posts to fordtrucks listservice.net, |
> | Send Unsubscribe requests to fordtrucks-request listservice.net |
> +-- Visit Our Web Site: http://www.ford-trucks.com/ --+

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 1 Sep 1997 19:14:51 -0700
From: canzus seanet.com
Subject: Re: Which Welder??

> I was looking at a small wire feed but am not
>sure if I want to spend three or four hundred on one right now. So here is
>where I need your advice. Do I keep the small (70 amp 120 volt) welder?
>Do I hold out for a wire feed some day? What would you all do?
>
>Thanks,
>-B

You'll be kicking yourself if you dont....

Steve & Rockette Leitch
Lifes a Beach...

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 1 Sep 1997 19:37:01 -0700
From: "Mark Mech"
Subject: 302 front cover

The 2 bolts on the outsides of the water jackets on the front cover of my
302 broke off flush with the cover. The cover is ready to come off but the
bolt stumps are corroded into the aluminum. Is there a good way to remove
these or do I get out the grinder and go buy a new cover.



Mark Mech
1913 E. El Parque
Tempe, Arizona 85282
aerofoam earthlink.net
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://home.earthlink.net/~aerofoam/

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 1 Sep 1997 20:14:20 -0700
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: Re: Which Welder??

>Sound to me like many of you that track this list serve do your own body
>work and other welding. I am interested in getting a welder. Actually I
>already picked up a small arch welder but do not know if I will keep it. I
>would like to be able to do some simple body work and maybe some heavier
>stuff like making a trailer or something of this sort. A friend of mine
>has both a big arch welder and an oxy/acetylene setup. He has done some
>body work with both and said he acutely had better success with the arch
>welder and a very fine rod. I was looking at a small wire feed but am not
>sure if I want to spend three or four hundred on one right now. So here is
>where I need your advice. Do I keep the small (70 amp 120 volt) welder?
>Do I hold out for a wire feed some day? What would you all do?


Hi Brett,

I do quite a bit of welding and have a good assortment of welding equipment.
Oxy-acet, lincoln SP-100 MIG, Lincoln/Exide/Homemade 250 amp MIG, and a
Linde 250HF TIG with all the fixins' for doing Stainless and aluminum.
(The Linde can also be used for stick.)

I think the little SP100 is one of the handiest tools in my garage.
I drag that little thing everywhere to fix stuff!
I can take it almost anywhere there's 120v power and have even run it from
a small portable generator.
It does an exellent job on sheet metal and body work and anything up
to about 3/16" in a single pass.
Heavier material over 3/16" may require deep beveling, several weld passes,
and possibly preheat with the oxy-acet torch, but good results on heavy
material but are certainly possible with the SP100.
I've even welded 3/4" x 6" flat bar with mine.(in a highly stressed
hydraulics application...) Time consuming, but possible.

You will find a good little MIG welder is much more versatile and easy to use
than a stick welder. I've welded plenty of sheet metal with small sticks, but
it is SO much easier with MIG and .023" wire...
Don't bother with the innershield wire, break down and get the gas kit and
a bottle of 75/25 Argon-CO2. The wire spool adapter that lets You use a 12lb
spool instead of the little 2lb spool is a good investment also. It will save
You $$ on wire if You use the welder much.

The SP100 can be had for about $450 with a gas kit and bottle.
Generic MIG welders are available for less $$ and I have used some with good
results and some with not-so-good results.
I bought the lincoln because it worked nice and I know parts will be
easily available if I ever need them.
When I used to repair welding equipment for a living, I gained a lot of
respect for Miller and Lincoln equipment. Easy to get parts and schematics
for them...

If You are doing bodywork, one of the advantages of MIG with a
small (.023") wire over a stick welder is that the arc is smaller, but more
intense so You get good penetration with less total heat input into the metal.
Less total heat means less warpage during welding. Less hammering and bondo
later.
It also requires less skill to avoid "burn-thru" on thin material. (-:

If You can possibly swing the extra $$ for the MIG, I'd go for it.
I've found more uses for mine than I could have imagined.
Even built a nice wood stove out of 1/4" steel plate with it...

Happy welding,





Steve Delanty
1971 F100 FE390 (patiently waiting for twin turbo's)

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 1 Sep 1997 20:14:26 -0700
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: Re:digest V1 #180/Welders...

>George Schott wrote:
>>
>> Bret,
>> I weld everyday for a living what you need is a wire feed mig machine
>> and use .023 wire also make sure you get the correct contact tips. This
>> is going to be your best choice it's easy light weight and very
>> versital.

Yes, I agree with George. Small MIG with .023" wire is a good thing for
auto enthusiest/home fabrication type stuff!!


>What make the .023 better than say the thicker wire, .030 or even the
>.035?
>
>Novice welder asking.
>
>Ford Content;
>
>Information need for building things for my Ford Truck>

Hey Don!

.023" wire is nice for sheet metal work. The smaller wire burns off at a
lower current, so You can turn it down and avoid burn thru on sheet meatal.
Most small machines (
wire anyway. You run out of amps before You run out of wire speed.
The larger wire is also stiffer and harder for the inexpensive wire feeds
to push. This can cause slippage and erratic operation especially if the
gun cable is not laid out fairly straight.
You are better off to run smaller wire at higher speed with most of these small
machines.

Happy motoring,

Steve Delanty
1971 F100 FE390 (patiently waiting for twin turbo's)

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 1 Sep 1997 21:07:02 -0700
From: "Deacon Blue"
Subject: Re: Which Welder??

Thanks Steve! Don't think I can talk you into coming down here, so I guess
I need to save up those bottle caps and by one!
How's the heater? Did you find the problem or are those portables
finding a new home? Next month should start dropping in temp up there! Give
a whole new meaning to Mercury Blues! Later!

Deacon Blue
jstrigas worldnet.att.net
It's here, It's thin. It's under construction. It's my Homepage!
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://home.att.net/~jstrigas/Homepage
or if your a Tbird fan
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.dragonfire.net/~site/tbirdknights/

- -----Original Message-----
From: sdelanty sonic.net
To: fordtrucks listservice.net
Date: Monday, September 01, 1997 8:16 PM
Subject: Re: Which Welder??



>
>>Sound to me like many of you that track this list serve do your own body
>>work and other welding. I am interested in getting a welder. Actually I
>>already picked up a small arch welder but do not know if I will keep it.
I
>>would like to be able to do some simple body work and maybe some heavier
>>stuff like making a trailer or something of this sort. A friend of mine
>>has both a big arch welder and an oxy/acetylene setup. He has done some
>>body work with both and said he acutely had better success with the arch
>>welder and a very fine rod. I was looking at a small wire feed but am
not
>>sure if I want to spend three or four hundred on one right now. So here
is
>>where I need your advice. Do I keep the small (70 amp 120 volt) welder?
>>Do I hold out for a wire feed some day? What would you all do?
>
>
> Hi Brett,
>
> I do quite a bit of welding and have a good assortment of welding
equipment.
> Oxy-acet, lincoln SP-100 MIG, Lincoln/Exide/Homemade 250 amp MIG, and a
> Linde 250HF TIG with all the fixins' for doing Stainless and aluminum.
> (The Linde can also be used for stick.)
>
> I think the little SP100 is one of the handiest tools in my garage.
> I drag that little thing everywhere to fix stuff!
> I can take it almost anywhere there's 120v power and have even run it from
> a small portable generator.
> It does an exellent job on sheet metal and body work and anything up
> to about 3/16" in a single pass.
> Heavier material over 3/16" may require deep beveling, several weld
passes,
> and possibly preheat with the oxy-acet torch, but good results on heavy
> material but are certainly possible with the SP100.
> I've even welded 3/4" x 6" flat bar with mine.(in a highly stressed
>hydraulics application...) Time consuming, but possible.
>
> You will find a good little MIG welder is much more versatile and easy to
use
> than a stick welder. I've welded plenty of sheet metal with small sticks,
but
> it is SO much easier with MIG and .023" wire...
> Don't bother with the innershield wire, break down and get the gas kit
and
> a bottle of 75/25 Argon-CO2. The wire spool adapter that lets You use a
12lb
> spool instead of the little 2lb spool is a good investment also. It will
save
> You $$ on wire if You use the welder much.
>
> The SP100 can be had for about $450 with a gas kit and bottle.
> Generic MIG welders are available for less $$ and I have used some with
good
> results and some with not-so-good results.
> I bought the lincoln because it worked nice and I know parts will be
> easily available if I ever need them.
> When I used to repair welding equipment for a living, I gained a lot of
> respect for Miller and Lincoln equipment. Easy to get parts and schematics
> for them...
>
> If You are doing bodywork, one of the advantages of MIG with a
> small (.023") wire over a stick welder is that the arc is smaller, but
more
> intense so You get good penetration with less total heat input into the
metal.
> Less total heat means less warpage during welding. Less hammering and
bondo
> later.
> It also requires less skill to avoid "burn-thru" on thin material. (-:
>
> If You can possibly swing the extra $$ for the MIG, I'd go for it.
> I've found more uses for mine than I could have imagined.
> Even built a nice wood stove out of 1/4" steel plate with it...
>
> Happy welding,
>
>
>
>
>
> Steve Delanty
> 1971 F100 FE390 (patiently waiting for twin turbo's)
>
>+-------------- Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1979 and Older --------------+
>| Send posts to fordtrucks listservice.net, |
>| Send Unsubscribe requests to fordtrucks-request listservice.net |
>+-- Visit Our Web Site: http://www.ford-trucks.com/ --+

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 2 Sep 1997 00:53:29 -0400 (EDT)
From: HYDROSMITH aol.com
Subject: Re: List breakdown.

I personally would not like to see a breakdown. I am between trucks(shopping
around) right now and I like having this together.

I would like to find another '77 f100 stepside ranger 117" wheelbase like I
had as a teenager. Great truck!

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 01 Sep 1997 22:22:06 -0700
From: danadeb pacbell.net
Subject: Duraspark II

Found this site to be very helpful in a my breaker point to Duraspark
II swap.

http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.wrljet.com/engines/duraspark.html

Dana

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 02 Sep 1997 00:16:13 -0500
From: "Donald R. Screen"
Subject: Re: 302 front cover

Mark Mech wrote:
>
> The 2 bolts on the outsides of the water jackets on the front cover of my
> 302 broke off flush with the cover. The cover is ready to come off but the
> bolt stumps are corroded into the aluminum. Is there a good way to remove
> these or do I get out the grinder and go buy a new cover.
>
>

You could spray the corroded bolt stubs with some WD40 or PB Catalyst
(available at Pep Boys) to help dissolve some of the rust. Let it sit
for a day or two after your spray it. Then you could use a screw
extractor tool to remove the sheared off bolts. If the threads in the
engine are damaged you can tap them with the correct tap. Need to make
sure that tap you use has the correct threads per inch and coarse or
fine as appropriate for the existing hole. If the threads are still in
need of repair after tapping the hole then you can use a product by
Loctite called Form a Thread. It is a two part epoxy type compound that
you apply to the new bolts to go in the hole. You spread it on the
threads of the bolt, screw the bolt in the hole, wait 5 minutes and then
remove the bolt. The internal threads will now have restored threads
after the compound sets up. I used this product on my 93 Olds to
restore intake manifold threads that had corroded chunks of heater
coupling literally heat welded to the aluminum intake manifold threads.....


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