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pre61-list Digest Thu, 01 Feb 2001 Volume: 2001  Issue: 025

In This Issue:
Re: engine painting
painting ( primer )
Re: painting ( primer )
Engine painting
Re: engine painting
Re: painting ( primer )
Re: A/C Units
Re: painting ( primer )

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Wed, 31 Jan 2001 22:00:12 -0600
From: JeffH <jeffh icon-stl.net>
Subject: Re: engine painting


At 10:50 AM 1/31/2001 -0500, Abram wrote:
> What are the pros and cons on painting your truck engine while still
>in the truck, and pros and cons of lifting the engine out and painting
>it.

Hmmm.  Taking out and cleaning would make the paint stay on a lot
longer, and would look nicer overall.  Leaving in would give that
coat of greas and rust and oil a nice coat of paint, and you'd have
to mask off everything to protect from overspray.  You'd save a
lot of heartache by doing it right the first time.

Well....  you might get by with removing the fenders and leaving the
engine in place, but definitely clean the block.

Personally, I'd go ahead and take the engine out, but I'm not
to that stage yet...

=====jeffh icon-stl.net=====http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.icon-stl.net/~jeffh======
Another fine message brought to you by the Screaming Penguins:
We're not inane, we're nane!



------------------------------

From: "shawn" <shawnwo home.com>
Subject: painting ( primer )
Date: Thu, 1 Feb 2001 01:02:59 -0800

I would like to add a question about painting as well. Specifically priming
all the inner fender wells etc i have removed and had sandblasted.
Everyone keeps bringing up using Epoxy primer, but i was hoping to prime the
bare metal myself in my garage, and i have heard that epoxy primer is very
dangerous stuff to work with if you do not have an oxygen feed mask etc.

Is there an alternative primer for the hobby user, that would be safe and effective
against corrosion like epoxy claims to be. I often wonder why they sell epoxy in spray cans
up here with very little warning other than to paint in an open ventialted area. with no mention of
a gas mask being used.
We have used por15 for the frame etc but this product does not give a smooth finish.

We are not looking at show quality by any means, but i wish to protect the sandblasted
metal with a waterproof primer of some sort that will not cause rusting underneath after we have
spray painted the inner fenders gloss black.

What products have you low budget folks used for your inner fenders etc.
Thanks
Shawn Overend
54 F100



------------------------------

Date: Thu, 01 Feb 2001 09:20:35 -0500
From: 47Fred <zelda_1 prodigy.net>
Subject: Re: painting ( primer )




shawn wrote:
>
> I would like to add a question about painting as well. Specifically priming
> all the inner fender wells etc i have removed and had sandblasted.
> Everyone keeps bringing up using Epoxy primer, but i was hoping to prime the
> bare metal myself in my garage, and i have heard that epoxy primer is very
> dangerous stuff to work with if you do not have an oxygen feed mask etc.

  There are several basic types of paints systems in common backyard
use, and none of them are what you'd call safe.  The enamel system uses
some pretty nasty solvents, like MEK, Xylene, toluene, well you get the
idea. Face it, most stuff you can't spell with 4 letters is bad for you.
Some of the enamels and some of the epoxy use isocyanates, some don't.
So called acrylic enamel hardener is mostly isocynate. The problem with
isocyanates is that a normal organic chemical respirator won't
effectively remove the iso. vapor. I'm told, by people who should know,
that there is no absorption media suitable for isocynate removal. Thus
the air supplied, postive pressure mask used by professional painters.
  Most of us have picked up a spray bomb, and let fly down in the
basement. Talk about exposure!  You can be pretty safe painting most
solvent based paint IF you use a hellish amount of ventilation air. This
includes low doses of isocyanates as well. In my case, I use 3 24" box
fans blowing into the garage, and lots of open windows on the opposite
end. The idea is to make a blow thru system that introduces fresh air at
one end, flows over the work area and exhausts on the other. Even so,
you need a good 1/2 or full face respirator with clean cartridges, rated
for solvents.  The mask needs a  tight face seal, no beards allowed, and
clean, functional exhaust and intake valves.
  I personally stay away from isocyanate based systems, I do use a low
dose of hardener at times, and I've used epoxy primer and still  have
some of my brains, (I think so anyway, how would I know)?
  I try not to take silly risks. I always use a clean cartridge on
anything that might have urethane, I check the face seal and clean the
valves every time I use the respirator, I use plenty of ventilation, and
consider that the bit of dirt here and there is is a small price to pay
for being able to curse it.
  Lately it seems that everything is being reformulated for lower
solvent levels which is probably not a bad thing, so now I ask the paint
guy what is in the stuff. I got some 2 component primer surfacer
recently and didn't ask. THe stuff was an isocynate system, lots of iso.
I sprayed it with the garage door wide open, one fan on the work, 3 more
exhausting. It didn't kill or sensitize me, but next time I asked the
paint man for a "one shot system" of the same type. Darned if it wasn't
about 1/2 the cost and went on better.

47Fred

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 01 Feb 2001 09:10:15 -0500
Subject: Re: painting ( primer )
From: Fred g 454 <fredg454 concentric.net>


Shawn,
I'm no pro, and have a low budget for this stuff as well. But, what I've
learned and what I did is this. the epoxy that they sell in cans and the two
part mix that your talking about are different. The two part is only good
for a short time after being mixed. Like epoxy glue. The guy at the local
paint store. (A professional store) sold me a mask with a couple of charcoal
filters, I think is was thirty bucks. He said it would work fine, and it
did. I'm still here. The important part is to still spray in a well vented
area. IE my garage with all the doors open or out in the driveway on a
windless day. It's the urethane (probably spelled wrong) paints thta will
kill you quickly if you inhale them. They cure with moisture which your
lungs supply plenty of. So don't paint the finish coat with a mask like
this. I primed mine much as you are saying to prevent the blasted parts from
rusting. And after I put it together to touch up areas that needed it.

I didn't intend to drive it tht way but it looked pretty cool in primer so I
flamed the hood and am still driving it that way. Good luck.

Fred

> We have used por15 for the frame etc but this product does not give a smooth
> finish.
>
> We are not looking at show quality by any means, but i wish to protect the
> sandblasted
> metal with a waterproof primer of some sort that will not cause rusting
> underneath after we have
> spray painted the inner fenders gloss black.
>
> What products have you low budget folks used for your inner fenders etc.
> Thanks
> Shawn Overend
> 54 F100
>
>
> =============================================================
> To  unsubscribe:   www.ford-trucks.com/mailinglist.html#item3
> Please remove this footer when replying.
>
>


------------------------------

From: "Bob Jones" <bobj pmihwy.com>
Subject: Engine painting
Date: Thu, 1 Feb 2001 08:20:51 -0600


Painting the engine in or out of the truck depends on how thorough you want
to be and the quality of the end product.

If you leave it in the truck it will be harder to get it completely clean.
You will get the areas you can see with the hood up and probally will miss
spots that people might see when they go snoopy around your truck.  These
type of people are out there, but you will save time.

By painting the engine out of the truck you can clean it more thoroughly and
do a better job but it will take a lot longer.

You can go by the following rule for any job:
SPEED   QUALITY  COST----pick two, you can't have all three.

I have used the Por-15 engine paint kit, it has everything you will need to
paint your engine and it lasts a lot longer than a spray can.


Bob Jones
'49 F-2 pickup
'48 F-1 panel truck
'49 8N


------------------------------

From: "O'Connell, Dennis M" <DMO1 pge.com>
Subject: Re: engine painting
Date: Thu, 1 Feb 2001 07:06:30 -0800


Abe,
Pull the engine.  It's the only way to get it done right.  You can touch up
when the engine is in, but trying to mask off everything and keep the
overspray off is almost impossible.  One hint. Use tinfoil as a masking tool
for hoses, etc where you need to cover a tough shape.

The POR 15 engine paint is just as good as their frame paint.  Brushed it on
my block and now I only touch it up once a year before show season.

Dennis
55F100
> ----------
> From: Abram H. Stauffer[SMTP:astauffe oak.kcsd.k12.pa.us]
> Reply To: pre61-list ford-trucks.com
> Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2001 7:50 AM
> To: pre61-list ford-trucks.com
> Subject: [pre61-list] engine painting
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------
> Support FTE - Check out our store:
> http://www.motorhaven.com/
> ----------------------------------------------------------
>
>  OK guys and gals, I need some advice.
> What are the pros and cons on painting your truck engine while
> still
> in the truck, and pros and cons of lifting the engine out and painting
> it.    Mine needs a lot of cleaning of grease, grime, and crud.  Can I
> paint with brush or spray can? what parts would have to be removed or
> covered.  I want to paint the '54 239 Y-block the original red, with
> argent valve covers, and black accessories.
>           Suggestions, tips, and experience welcomed.   Thanks,     Abe
> =============================================================
> To  unsubscribe:   www.ford-trucks.com/mailinglist.html#item3
> Please remove this footer when replying.
>

------------------------------

From: "O'Connell, Dennis M" <DMO1 pge.com>
Subject: Re: painting ( primer )
Date: Thu, 1 Feb 2001 07:20:43 -0800


Shawn,

Any primer will give you some form of rust prevention.  It's just that the
epoxy primers give the best seal and bite.  I've painted three cars in my
garage, one twice, each one with the poly urethanes and have always used a
primer like DP42(PPG). Went on well and adhered well.   No air mask just a
good cartridge mask.  Not the smartest choice, but since I do my own paint
and have a limited budget, my only choice.  Another option I have used  on
the inner fenders is to use a deadening material in the fenders.It helps
stop rock dings and such and is easy to maintain.  Removes the problem of
trying to keep nice shiny fender wells when it's a driver.  Another product
I have tried is called Noise Killer.  Sprayed on like undercoat but hardened
like an acrylic plastic.  Water tight, but gave a pebbled look. You could
paint over it.  I don't know if they are still around, but it was good
stuff.

Dennis
55F100


> ----------
> From: shawn[SMTP:shawnwo home.com]
> Reply To: pre61-list ford-trucks.com
> Sent: Thursday, February 01, 2001 1:02 AM
> To: pre61-list ford-trucks.com
> Subject: [pre61-list] painting ( primer )
>
>
>
> What products have you low budget folks used for your inner fenders etc.
> Thanks
> Shawn Overend
> 54 F100
>
>
> =============================================================
> To  unsubscribe:   www.ford-trucks.com/mailinglist.html#item3
> Please remove this footer when replying.
>

------------------------------

From: MichellHC aol.com
Date: Thu, 1 Feb 2001 11:29:37 EST
Subject: Re: A/C Units


I have a Hurricane unit in my 56. The secret of any if these A/C units
regardless if it is a Hurricane,Old Air, or Antique is insulation. Our first
experience was with a 55 F-600 it had fire wall insulation and rubber floor
mats and would cool on a hot Texas day like crazy when you first started it
and for about the first 15 to 20 miles, then it would get hot inside the
truck. We went back and insulated the floor and that made all the difference.
With that lesson learned when I did my 56 I spared no insulation. It is very
well insulated from floor to roof. Even the back of the cab behind the seat
is insulated as well as inside the doors. Not only does the truck stay plenty
cool inside on hot days, it is also very quite. You can carry on a normal
conversation at 70 miles an hour without raising your voice. I have flow
masters on the truck and you can hear them as your speed increases but at 60
and above when you level your speed off it is quite as a mouse. It is quitter
inside than my 95 F-250. BTW I only bought the evaporator and duck work from
them. I used a condenser and dryer assembly from a 79 Ford pickup. It will
bolt up real nice with plenty of clearance. I sprung for a polished aluminum
Sandin compressor. The combination works very well together.

Michelle

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 01 Feb 2001 21:30:02 -0800
From: Dan Laray <dlaray earthlink.net>
Subject: Re: painting ( primer )


Shawn - since you can't buy health, I think this alternative is viable. Take it to a "you prep, you
paint" shop. You can use their suit when you shoot.
Dan

shawn wrote:

> ----------------------------------------------------------
> Support FTE - Check out our store:
> http://www.motorhaven.com/
> ----------------------------------------------------------
> I would like to add a question about painting as well. Specifically priming
> all the inner fender wells etc i have removed and had sandblasted.
> Everyone keeps bringing up using Epoxy primer, but i was hoping to prime the
> bare metal myself in my garage, and i have heard that epoxy primer is very
> dangerous stuff to work with if you do not have an oxygen feed mask etc.
>
> Is there an alternative primer for the hobby user, that would be safe and effective
> against corrosion like epoxy claims to be. I often wonder why they sell epoxy in spray cans
> up here with very little warning other than to paint in an open ventialted area. with no mention of
> a gas mask being used.
> We have used por15 for the frame etc but this product does not give a smooth finish.
>
> We are not looking at show quality by any means, but i wish to protect the sandblasted
> metal with a waterproof primer of some sort that will not cause rusting underneath after we have
> spray painted the inner fenders gloss black.
>
> What products have you low budget folks used for your inner fenders etc.
> Thanks
> Shawn Overend
> 54 F100
>
> =============================================================
> To  unsubscribe:   www.ford-trucks.com/mailinglist.html#item3
> Please remove this footer when replying.


------------------------------

End of pre61-list Digest V2001 #25
**********************************
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Ford Truck Enthusiasts  offers books to help you restore your truck:

-Ford Truck Parts Locating Guide
-1948-1960 Ford truck shop manuals (printed and on CD-ROM)
-1948-1960 Owners manuals
-How to Restore Metal Auto Trim
-1944-1952 Body Parts Catalog
-The Complete Ford Flathead V8 Engine Manual

....


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