pre61-list-digest Tuesday, September 1 1998 Volume 02 : Number 243



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Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1960 and Older trucks and vans
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In this issue:

Re: FTE Pre61 - 39 torque tube
FTE Pre61 - three-on-the-tree

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Date: Mon, 31 Aug 1998 09:55:23 -0400
From: 47Fred
Subject: Re: FTE Pre61 - 39 torque tube

Joe Michels wrote:

> Colleagues-- Could we have a basic tutorial on this torque tube? I don't
> have a 39, but am interested in the mechanics of how it works and why this
> is so difficult. Not doubting what you are saying, just unable to
> visualize where the problems are. If this is simple, maybe someone could
> teach all of us.
>

The so called torque tube rear axle set up was commonly used in many early cars
and trucks up until the late 50's and perhaps later. In theory, and probably
practice, it is an excellent suspension system. There is a solid steel tube
bolted to the front of the rear axle which runs up to the rear of the
transmission. The drive shaft is in the center of the tube, a universal joint,
and a specialized ball joint at the transmission allow the axle to move up and
down, using the tube as a lever arm. Rotation of the axle, which is controlled
by springs, traction bars and snubbers in "conventional" open drive trains is
much reduced, if not eliminated by the torque tube. The system uses only one
universal, always has the the correct driveshaft/axle angle and is closed to
reduce damage from dirt and such. It even works, and perhaps is best used with,
Ford's"buggy" transverse spring system. The main drawback seems to be cost and
inflexibility, and the systems are harder to work on when repairs are needed.
Interchanging of axles (IE: hot rodding) is more difficult. Modern adaptations
such as the Griggs Racing unit are available to apply the principal to late
model Mustangs, among others.

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Date: Mon, 31 Aug 1998 20:52:57 -0700
From: Kemp Farnsworth
Subject: FTE Pre61 - three-on-the-tree

In a '57 F-100 are both shifting rods for a three-on-the-tree kind of an
obtuse "L" shape? On my truck, the rear one is, but my front one (with
respect to the transmission and the front of the truck) looks like it
has been mickey moused, and it gets hit by my clutch lever that lifts
the clutch off of the torque converter or whatever is there. Anyway
when the clutch is depressed I can't shift. Anybody know about this?

Ryan Farnsworth
== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

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End of pre61-list-digest V2 #243
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