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Date: Sat, 14 Mar 1998 03:50:25 -0700 (MST)
From: owner-fordtrucks-digest ListService.net (fordtrucks-digest)
To: fordtrucks-digest ListService.net
Subject: fordtrucks-digest V2 #68
Reply-To: fordtrucks ListService.net
Sender: owner-fordtrucks-digest ListService.net


fordtrucks-digest Saturday, March 14 1998 Volume 02 : Number 068



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Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1960 And Older Trucks Digest
Visit our web site: http://www.ford-trucks.com/
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In this issue:

frenched antennas [RPietsch webtv.net (Richard Pietsch)]
Re: ADMIN: Another milestone, my comment [Cdalep ]
custom cabs ["Neal B. Forbes" ]
dtstokes juno.com (traci stokes) Subject: custom cab [RJC988
more ?s [RJC988 ]
Another milestone [Ray Cardogno ]

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Date: Fri, 13 Mar 1998 02:54:25 -0800
From: RPietsch webtv.net (Richard Pietsch)
Subject: frenched antennas

The first time I saw a frenched antenna at a truck show, I said to
myself, I gotta do that to my truck too. Not knowing of any kit to do
such a thing I used my inagination. I went down to the auto parts store
and purchased a power antenna and a piece of exhaust pipe repair tubing,
just a little larger than the size of the antenna base diameter. Then I
cut the tubing at a steep angle with the short side about an inch and a
half or so from the end. I then welded on a piece of 1/8" steel to the
bottom and drilled a hole large enough for the antenna to mount in. I
also drilled a small hole in the side, even with the bottom, and silver
soldered in a short piece of brass tube that I got at the local hobby
shop. This is for water drainage. I then picked a spot on the side of
the cab where the side curves in toward the narrower part of the cab.
Using the angle part of the tube for a pattern, I cut a hole in the cab.
I then took the rig over to a freind who has a mig welder and had him
weld in the piece I had made. I could have welded it in with my stick
welder, but a mig does a much nicer job. After welding it in place, I
ground it down smooth and primed it ready for paint. I attached a piece
of vacuum hose to the tube I soldered in, and ran it down and out
through the hole in the cab floor where the gas tank drain is. It was a
pretty simple job, and I get lots of comments on how great it looks. I
don't think I spent more than 10 or 15 bucks, plus the antenna, on the
whole job and it looks great.

The Oldtrukman
Rix56

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Date: Fri, 13 Mar 1998 14:48:56 EST
From: Cdalep
Subject: Re: ADMIN: Another milestone, my comment

Ken, I've really enjoyed your efforts keep up the good work .

Cliff

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Date: Fri, 13 Mar 1998 20:48:35 -0500
From: "Neal B. Forbes"
Subject: custom cabs

According to Ackerson's Ford F100/F150 Pickup

"The standard cab was finished in a gray plaid pattern with red vinyl
facings. The Custom Cab was fitted with black and white chain-stripe
upholstery with vinyl bolster and facing. The bolster and facing were
color-keyed, red or copper-tone to harmonize with the truck's exterior
finish. Additional Custom Cab features included specific door trim and
hardware, perforated thermo-acoustic header backed by one inch thick glass
wool insulation, sound deadener on floor and rear cab panels, grip-type arm
rest on left door, large dome light with manual switch, two adjustable sun
visors and an illuminated cigar lighter. The Custom cab exterior features
consisted of a "Custom Cab" identification plate positioned just below the
door window, bright finish reveal moulding for the windshield and a bright
metal grille. This latter feature had not been available on a Ford truck
since 1938."

This is a great reference book. I got mine from the Classic Motorbooks
Catalog.

Neal Forbes 54 F100 292 quad named "HOT HEAP"

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Date: Fri, 13 Mar 1998 23:42:52 EST
From: RJC988
Subject: dtstokes juno.com (traci stokes) Subject: custom cab

Traci,

One big difference is the custom cab has a stainless steel trim piece in the
front and rear glass seal. This is a special rubber piece with a groove for
this trim. I believe the custom cab also has some other trim features. These
emblems are in every catalog, so someone might have just installed them on
your truck.

Glenn in Memphis
a '57 F-100 with no name yet!

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Date: Fri, 13 Mar 1998 23:49:10 EST
From: RJC988
Subject: more ?s

t's been a while since I've posted. Here goes with some comments/questions.

1.) IFS - There is an article in the last 2 truck magazines I s*bscribe
to that tell of a new Dakota IFS swap. It works without all of the frame
trimming (still some - just not as much) that a Volare' (Dodge Aspen) has. The
most beneficial feature of this Dakota swap is it uses late model 1/2 ton
truck pieces! I also hear that the junk yards are full of these trucks. The
I.C. crossmember is about $650. I don't yet know what the truck pieces
cost in my area. I would also want to know if the Dakota rear end will be wide
enough for my '57? The main reason I would like to change both is for same
bolt hole diameters on front and back.
The main reason I want to change my front end is brakes. Even if I find a
disc brake kit for mine, I hear these old trucks have ball bearings that wear
out every year or so instead of the roller bearings that later vehicles have.

2.) I also give getting the fuel tank out of the cabin a large priority.
I have heard many suggestions. Get a new tank and pay at least $400 for it
(along with new pickup units, gage sending units, and lines) or get one out of
a donor vehicle, put at least 2 fuel filters on it, and hope of the best (all
costing about $25). HELP!!!!

3.) My latest engine choice (and here come the flames!) is a 4.3 litre V6
and overdrive from a late model GM minivan or truck. Has anyone tried (or
heard) of this? Is this swap going to be without much aftermarket help? I want
power but fuel ecomony as well. Mechanics are very keen on these engines, so
they must be able to work on them.

4.) My truck is not ready to be seen on a website (unless you guys want
to see how far I have to go), but this is a great idea. How is a site
constructed? Will I need to get some sort of graphics software (as opposed to
truck parts!)? This a great idea. I look forward to seeing everybody.

Glenn in Memphis (April = Bartlett, TN!!)
1957 Ford F-100 w/223 inline 6 ...3 on the tree!

ps. how's that Ken?

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Date: Sat, 14 Mar 1998 00:11:05 -0400
From: Ray Cardogno
Subject: Another milestone

>Its official: just passed 2000 members. Did a count and
>there are now 2017 members on the lists. Thanks everyone!
>
>Ken Payne

T H A N K S K E N !

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