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Date: Wed, 14 Jan 1998 03:50:23 -0700 (MST)
From: owner-fordtrucks-digest ListService.net (fordtrucks-digest)
To: fordtrucks-digest ListService.net
Subject: fordtrucks-digest V2 #10
Reply-To: fordtrucks ListService.net
Sender: owner-fordtrucks-digest ListService.net


fordtrucks-digest Wednesday, January 14 1998 Volume 02 : Number 010



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Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1960 And Older Trucks Digest
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In this issue:

302 into a '51 ["Don & Teresa Neighbors" ]
1948 ford questions ["Olson Family" ]
Re: 1948 ford questions [Jeff Hazewinkel ]
RE: 1948 ford questions ["Tarnoff, Howard" ]
1948 TRUCK [Fordf3 ]
'59 F100 [Josh Hamilton ]
Re: 1948 ford questions [JRFiero ]
[none] [jc& terry ]
Re: 1948 ford questions [TonyDePaul ]
Re: fordtrucks-digest V2 #9 [JSanc82344 ]

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Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 06:37:34 -0500
From: "Don & Teresa Neighbors"
Subject: 302 into a '51

In Volume 2, #9, Bill wrote
> Hello,
>
> I am thinking about putting a late model fuel injected 302 in my 1951
> f-1, Does anyone know what stuff I will have to take out of the donor
> car ?? Will I have to take the wiring harness, computer and all that
> stuff ? What about the pollution stuff???
> Thanks
> Bill
> 1951 F-1

Hey, Bill:
One of the great things about todays fuel injected engines is the fact
that most of the pollution control equipment is integral with the engine
management system, making under hood plumbing much less daunting. The bad
thing is, yes, it all has to come out: engine wire harness, computer, etc.
That said, the aftermarket provides programmable chips for those
computers, and aftermarket catalytic convertors that may fit better than
the stock one. Aftermarket wiring harnesses are also available which are
specific to the engine swap, leaving out some of the extraneous wiring. I
have not performed this operation myself yet, but I have been doing a
little reading up on it because I dream of doing it to a vehicle I own
which is neither a Ford nor a pickup.
Good Luck!

Don N.
'54 F250 Named Grover

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 09:24:05 -0700
From: "Olson Family"
Subject: 1948 ford questions

I am new to this list but I have some questions that I hope some of you can
answer. This is my first truck restoration so please bear with me.
I found a 1948 (so I am told but I haven't checked for sure what year) ford
pickup truck with a V8 flathead engine. I think the engine may be siezed
but it looks complete. The transmition, dirive shaft and differential are
all there. There is no box on it but the cab has fair paint good sheet
metal exept for right front fender, bumper and running boards. I am told
the brakes didn't work when it was parked. As you would have guessed the
tires are bald and flat (7.50/17R size tires) and all the glass is
broken.How much work/money would you guess I would have to put into it? How
hard is it to find parts? Is this a fairly easy truck to repair? How much
money should I offer for it? Thanks in advance for any help.
Joshua

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 10:51:48 -0600
From: Jeff Hazewinkel
Subject: Re: 1948 ford questions

Joshua,

You will be able to find almost every part you need for the 48 trucks.
That year is common with most of the companies that supply restoration
materials.

As for total restoration cost there are alot of factors, including what
you are able to do yourself, what tools you have and if you are looking
to make a show quality, daily driver, or original restoration. I would
guess that after the truck is finished you could spend around $4000 -
$5000. I never tried to estimate the restoration cost of my projects, I
think it might scare me away.

As for what to offer, for my 53 that was in about the same condition you
described I paid $150. For a 47 with a rebuilt flathead V8 I paid
$1000. I would start around $150 and go from there.

Jeff


Olson Family wrote:
>
> I am new to this list but I have some questions that I hope some of you can
> answer. This is my first truck restoration so please bear with me.
> I found a 1948 (so I am told but I haven't checked for sure what year) ford
> pickup truck with a V8 flathead engine. I think the engine may be siezed
> but it looks complete. The transmition, dirive shaft and differential are
> all there. There is no box on it but the cab has fair paint good sheet
> metal exept for right front fender, bumper and running boards. I am told
> the brakes didn't work when it was parked. As you would have guessed the
> tires are bald and flat (7.50/17R size tires) and all the glass is
> broken.How much work/money would you guess I would have to put into it? How
> hard is it to find parts? Is this a fairly easy truck to repair? How much
> money should I offer for it? Thanks in advance for any help.
> Joshua
>
> +-------------- Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1960 and Older --------------+
> | Send posts to fordtrucks listservice.net, removal form on the web |
> | site. |
> +---------- Visit Our Web Site: http://www.ford-trucks.com/ ----------+

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 11:54:16 -0500
From: "Tarnoff, Howard"
Subject: RE: 1948 ford questions

Two considerations are your desire to do a lot of the work yourself
versus your ability and the degree that you want to take the project. I
have looked at a lot of trucks from $5000 to $35000. It boils down to
paid labor and dress.

Best of luck and HAVE FUN!

Howard

> ----------
> From: Olson Family[SMTP:tolson cypronet.com]
> Reply To: fordtrucks listservice.net
> Sent: Tuesday, January 13, 1998 11:24 AM
> To: Ford truck list
> Subject: 1948 ford questions
>
> I am new to this list but I have some questions that I hope some of
> you can
> answer. This is my first truck restoration so please bear with me.
> I found a 1948 (so I am told but I haven't checked for sure what year)
> ford
> pickup truck with a V8 flathead engine. I think the engine may be
> siezed
> but it looks complete. The transmition, dirive shaft and differential
> are
> all there. There is no box on it but the cab has fair paint good sheet
> metal exept for right front fender, bumper and running boards. I am
> told
> the brakes didn't work when it was parked. As you would have guessed
> the
> tires are bald and flat (7.50/17R size tires) and all the glass is
> broken.How much work/money would you guess I would have to put into
> it? How
> hard is it to find parts? Is this a fairly easy truck to repair? How
> much
> money should I offer for it? Thanks in advance for any help.
> Joshua
>
> +-------------- Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1960 and Older
> --------------+
> | Send posts to fordtrucks listservice.net, removal form on the web
> |
> | site.
> |
> +---------- Visit Our Web Site: http://www.ford-trucks.com/
> ----------+
>

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 18:30:21 EST
From: Fordf3
Subject: 1948 TRUCK

7.50 17 tires tell me your truck is a F-3 parts are harder to find than F-1
I have a f-3 apicture of it is available in the pictorial section
Be glad to help wher i can. Cost went through the roof
Ed

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 17:51:30 -0600
From: Josh Hamilton
Subject: '59 F100

I have a '59 F100 and I am having trouble finding a 223 engine that will
work. I have been through three engines and all have been bad. I am
hoping to find another engine that will fit onto the transmission that
is already in it. It is the original Synchromesh 3-speed manual
transmission. Do you know of any engines that would fit in there
without too many modifications?

Thank you for your input,
Josh

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 19:42:10 EST
From: JRFiero
Subject: Re: 1948 ford questions

In a message dated 98-01-13 11:35:07 EST, you write:


answer. This is my first truck restoration so please bear with me.
I found a 1948 (so I am told but I haven't checked for sure what year) ford
pickup truck with a V8 flathead engine. I think the engine may be siezed
but it looks complete. The transmition, dirive shaft and differential are
all there. There is no box on it but the cab has fair paint good sheet
metal exept for right front fender, bumper and running boards. I am told
the brakes didn't work when it was parked. As you would have guessed the
tires are bald and flat (7.50/17R size tires) and all the glass is
broken.How much work/money would you guess I would have to put into it? How
hard is it to find parts? Is this a fairly easy truck to repair? How much
money should I offer for it? Thanks in advance for any help.
Joshua >>

Joshua, you're looking at a lot of work, and a lot of money. Parts are all
available, you'd be amazed. It's relatively easy to repair. But from what
you describe, I wouldn't bother unless they give it to you. I myself might
pay a little something for it, but just for the flathead 'cause I have some.
If I were you, I'd look for something more complete, unluss you really want an
extensive project.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 19:54:48 -0800
From: jc& terry
Subject: [none]

I am thinking about putting a late model fuel injected 302 in my 1951
f-1, Does anyone know what stuff I will have to take out of the donor
car ?? Will I have to take the wiring harness, computer and all that
stuff ? What about the pollution stuff???
Thanks
Bill
1951 F-1

there are several options on this switch. 1st, you have 2 types of efi,
tuned port(tpi) and throttle body(tbi). the latter looks like a regular carb
but has wires running out of it in different locations. the tpi is a set up
with a seperate injector for each cylinder. the reason i mention this is
although both would do the job, they have different wiring requirements. the
after market harness is available for the tpi from almost any ford
performance dealer or any mustang place. the tbi is harder to find. i would
suggest you find a hot rod shop that does this conversion or at least
someone with wiring experience. if you are knowledgable yourself you can get
the kits. you need the computer and all the components that come with the
engine as it is specific to how the computer sets it up and runs. this will
not be cheap but it is cool.
it also has some drawbacks. ford uses only codes on the computer diagnostic
printout. if you do not have the book you will not know what is wrong even
if you have a diagnostic scanner. also the chip in the computer cannot be
changed to make corrections to your unit. you must buy a complete computer.
you will also encounter astronomical prices on some of the parts as you now
have a motor from a 20k vehicle so several hundred dollars is the going
price for parts. i am not trying to discourage you as i have seen this done
and it is awesome.
the bright side is you can buy all yur parts at the mustang or ford
performance places that are everywhere and you will have a fuel efficient,
strong, up to the minute powerplant. i would also go for the aod trans. it
runs off the computer as well. this will give you the power you need and
good mileage on the highway.
i prefer to use some modern parts and some old parts so i do not have to go
to the computer center and have a nerd tell me what's wrong with my ride and
have him fix it for me. plus, the plain old 302 four barrel can be made into
400 horses really cheap in comparison. lots of chrome goodies available too.
c-4 with a shift kit will kick an aod's butt and 4 times cheaper.
i know i'll get flack for some of this but i like the exchange of ideas.
this is some of my opinion. sure would like to hear what others think. gets
real boring here sometimes. what about it guys?

T-bird Terry

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 23:14:31 EST
From: TonyDePaul
Subject: Re: 1948 ford questions

Joshua,

A '48 that doesn't run, or even roll? Offer a few hundred bucks and you've got
yourself a parts truck. It'll cost you $10,000 to restore that '48 if it costs
a penny -- and that's if you do everything yourself. I'd advise you to look
around for a truck that will get you off to a better start.

I paid about $2,000 for a '49 that was original down to the last nut and bolt,
99 percent rust-free, and it was running. I probably put $5,000 or $6,000 into
it to bring it back to what it looked like when the dealer delivered it in
1949. But that first two grand was the best money I ever spent.

Best of luck whatever you decide,

Tony

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 13 Jan 1998 23:50:20 EST....


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