perf-list-digest Tuesday, June 8 1999 Volume 02 : Number 139



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Ford Truck Enthusiasts - Performance
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In this issue:

Re: FTE Perf - 0.40 over
Re: FTE Perf - 0.40 over
Re: FTE Perf - K&N or KKM?
Re: FTE Perf - 0.40 over
Re: FTE Perf - Exhaust/Cat question
RE: FTE Perf - 0.40 over
RE: FTE Perf - Exhaust/Cat question
FTE Perf - hydraulic lifters
RE: FTE Perf - hydraulic lifters
FTE Perf - Removal of headlights on an F150
FTE Perf - FTE PERF - Header question
Re: FTE Perf - 0.40 over
FTE Perf - Re: 0.40 over
FTE Perf - .60 over??

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Date: Mon, 07 Jun 1999 03:00:54 -0500
From: "Robert F. Davis"
Subject: Re: FTE Perf - 0.40 over

At 08:48 AM 06/06/99 -0700, you wrote:
>I was wondering what the displacement of a 351 Windsor would be after
>being bored 40 over.
>
> thanks

et al,
Get your claculator out & figure it.

Bore x Bore x Stroke x No. of cyls. x .7854 = Displacement

OR

4.040" x 4.040" x 3.5" x 8 x .7854 = 358.93156 cubic inches

hope this helps.

"Beater" Bob
Professor of Automotive Technology
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Date: Mon, 07 Jun 1999 08:24:28 -0500
From: Edward Saunders
Subject: Re: FTE Perf - 0.40 over

What would the formula be for a .040 over 302?
Thanks
Ed Saunders 86 F-150 302

"Robert F. Davis" wrote:

> At 08:48 AM 06/06/99 -0700, you wrote:
> >I was wondering what the displacement of a 351 Windsor would be after
> >being bored 40 over.
> >
> > thanks
>
> et al,
> Get your claculator out & figure it.
>
> Bore x Bore x Stroke x No. of cyls. x .7854 = Displacement
>
> OR
>
> 4.040" x 4.040" x 3.5" x 8 x .7854 = 358.93156 cubic inches
>
> hope this helps.
>
> "Beater" Bob
> Professor of Automotive Technology
> == FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

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Date: Mon, 07 Jun 1999 09:08:00 -0500
From: William S Hart
Subject: Re: FTE Perf - K&N or KKM?

>Speaking of K&N, Does anyone have a favorite place to pick one up at and
>not get the screw-driver in the process?
>
My local parts store was within a couple bucks (in my favor) of summit and
jegs ...


Just my 2cents

wish

Links http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.public.iastate.edu/~wish/links.html
'73 1/2 ton 4x4 Ford http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.public.iastate.edu/~wish/truck.html
'96 Mustang GT http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.public.iastate.edu/~wish/mustang.html
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Date: Mon, 07 Jun 1999 09:10:39 -0500
From: William S Hart
Subject: Re: FTE Perf - 0.40 over

At 08:24 AM 6/7/99 , you wrote:
>What would the formula be for a .040 over 302?

Same thing. 302's stroke is a 3.0 ... we'll leave the rest as an exercise
for the user...

for specs on motors such as bore and stroke try

www.wrljet.com

or if its newer/non-ford

www.carpoint.msn.com

>> Bore x Bore x Stroke x No. of cyls. x .7854 = Displacement
>>
>> OR
>>
>> 4.040" x 4.040" x 3.5" x 8 x .7854 = 358.93156 cubic inches
>>

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Date: Mon, 07 Jun 1999 09:13:06 -0500
From: William S Hart
Subject: Re: FTE Perf - Exhaust/Cat question

>two months after he swapped the engines, his catalytic converter went out
>and he had it replaced. Anyways, after he did so, his exhuast started
>smelling like...well, its unpleasant to say the least. Could it be a faulty
>cat, or would it be something else?

I would definitely check and see if its running rich ... also be sure and
run unleaded, no lead additive or anything, that will hose a cat pretty
quick (a catalytic converter too). Another possibility is something the
newer stangs are noticing, headers run warmer than manifolds, the paint and
stuff that came from the factory on there, didn't get cured by the stock
manifolds, adding more motor and headers adds lots more heat ... the
result, more paint curing/burning under the vehicle ...though that should
only last a couple weeks I think ...depending on how much he drives it ...


Just my 2cents

wish

Links http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.public.iastate.edu/~wish/links.html
'73 1/2 ton 4x4 Ford http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.public.iastate.edu/~wish/truck.html
'96 Mustang GT http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.public.iastate.edu/~wish/mustang.html
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Date: Mon, 7 Jun 1999 12:46:40 -0500
From: "Baldwin, Dave (CPCP Design)"
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - 0.40 over

Rich, and anyone interested:

The displacement of one cylinder is the cross-sectional area of the cylinder
multiplied by the distance it is swept by the stroke. Multiply this by the
number of cylinders and you can get the displacement of any motor you'd like
(as long as it is a reciprocating internal combustion engine).

Area of a circle: A = PI * R^2, where PI ~= 3.1416 and R = radus = bore /
2

so the volume swept by the piston is:

V = A * stroke

putting it all together:

Displacement = N * PI * stroke * bore^2 / 4

where N is number of cylinders

Examples:

for a 351: Displacement = 8 * 3.14 * 3.5in * 4in^2 / 4 = 351.7 cu. in.

351 w/0.040 in over = 8 * 3.14 * 3.5in * 4.040in^2 / 4 = 358.9 cu. in.

302 = 8 * 3.14 * 3in * 4in^2 / 4 = 301.6 cu. in.

302 stroker (347) = 8 * 3.14 * 3.4in * 4.030in^2 / 4 = 347.0 cu. in.

2.5L straight six = 6 * 3.14 * 3.5in * 3in^2 / 4 = 148.4 cu in
= 2432 cc or
2.432L

Notice that you can use whatever units you like, the equation remains the
same.

Enjoy. Hope this helps.

Dave Baldwin
Dallas, TX

> -----Original Message-----
> From: rich may [mailto:doom460 yahoo.com]
> Sent: Sunday, June 06, 1999 10:48 AM
> To: perf-list ford-trucks.com
> Subject: FTE Perf - 0.40 over
>
>
> I was wondering what the displacement of a 351 Windsor would be after
> being bored 40 over.
>
> thanks
> _________________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> >
> == FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info
> http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html
>
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------------------------------

Date: Mon, 7 Jun 1999 14:27:54 -0500
From: "Baldwin, Dave (CPCP Design)"
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Exhaust/Cat question

Another thing to check is that the air pump is putting out air into the
exhaust system for the catalyst to react extra fuel with. Check that there
is an air pump and that the lines and valves are not plugged.

Dave Baldwin
Dallas, TX

> -----Original Message-----
> From: William S Hart [mailto:wish iastate.edu]
> Sent: Monday, June 07, 1999 9:13 AM
> To: perf-list ford-trucks.com
> Subject: Re: FTE Perf - Exhaust/Cat question
>
>
> >two months after he swapped the engines, his catalytic
> converter went out
> >and he had it replaced. Anyways, after he did so, his
> exhuast started
> >smelling like...well, its unpleasant to say the least. Could
> it be a faulty
> >cat, or would it be something else?
>
> I would definitely check and see if its running rich ... also
> be sure and
> run unleaded, no lead additive or anything, that will hose a
> cat pretty
> quick (a catalytic converter too). Another possibility is
> something the
> newer stangs are noticing, headers run warmer than manifolds,
> the paint and
> stuff that came from the factory on there, didn't get cured
> by the stock
> manifolds, adding more motor and headers adds lots more heat ... the
> result, more paint curing/burning under the vehicle ...though
> that should
> only last a couple weeks I think ...depending on how much he
> drives it ...
>
>
> Just my 2cents
>
> wish
>
> Links
> http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.public.iastate.edu/~wish/links.html
> '73 1/2 ton
> 4x4 Ford http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.public.iastate.edu/~wish/truck.html
> '96 Mustang GT
> http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.public.iastate.edu/> ~wish/mustang.html
> == FTE:
> Uns*bscribe and posting info
> http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html
>
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------------------------------

Date: Mon, 07 Jun 1999 19:07:31 -0400
From: Dan Shade
Subject: FTE Perf - hydraulic lifters

Do any of you guys know the theory of hydraulic lifters? As I
understand it, hydraulics have an oil "cushion" that a solid lifter does
not, allowing more tolerance for valve train problems, but I would like
to know why. Also does a hydraulic act like a solid when it is pumped
up? What are anti-pump up lifters?

Dan Shade

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Date: Mon, 7 Jun 1999 19:59:15 -0400
From: Sleddog
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - hydraulic lifters

Dan,
I put up on my webpage, a nice drawing of a lifter, sectioned.

http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.geocities.com/MotorCity/Downs/7273

and follow the link at the very bottom of the page.

The lifter uses oil, to allow for a larger tolerance in the valve mechanism
between the cam and the valve. the oil, is trapped inside a cavity, and
allowed to escape thru holes, while constantly being replenished. the
volume of oil in the lifter cavity will change depending on actual pushrod
length, rocker wear, etc.

At low rpms, oil has more time to escape, and this is the idea behind
variable duration lifters. they are basically lifters with looser
tolerances, or extra holes/slots that allow oil to pass thruogh faster. at
higher rpms, the time is less, and they still give full lift. if the
lifter does not have a good enough oil supply, it will bottom out, and not
open valve properly. this is a cause of many engines' ticking sounds at
startup.

if, the oil cannot escape fast enough, the lifter will slowly push the push
rod higher and higher, until the valve stays open, or parts collide.
another possible result is the lifter piston inside, or plunger, pushing
up to the snap ring that holds it in place. this can, if not already doing
something to stop the engines continued running, could pop the snap ring
out, with the results of small parts flying around inside your engine.

check out the picture.
later on.

sleddog

- ----------
From: Dan Shade[SMTP:dshade erols.com]
Sent: Monday, June 07, 1999 7:07 PM
To: perf
Subject: FTE Perf - hydraulic lifters

Do any of you guys know the theory of hydraulic lifters? As I
understand it, hydraulics have an oil "cushion" that a solid lifter does
not, allowing more tolerance for valve train problems, but I would like
to know why. Also does a hydraulic act like a solid when it is pumped
up? What are anti-pump up lifters?

Dan Shade

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Date: Mon, 07 Jun 1999 21:04:10 -0400
From: Jim Knapper
Subject: FTE Perf - Removal of headlights on an F150

I'm having trouble getting the diagram for the person who wanted to know
how to remove the headlights on his F150. I'll see if I can describe the
procedure. With the hood open, look at the top of the headlight, looking
toward the back of the truck. There should be 2 "tabs" one at either end
of the headlight assembly. The ones I've seen have a black plastic
coating on them, kind of like they've been dipped in the plastic. Pull
up on the tabs. There are 2 different types of tabs depending on when
you truck was made. On early 1997 trucks the tabs will come all the way
out, on all others the tabs move up about 1" and release the headlight
assembly. Let me know if my instructions are clear enough, if they
aren't I'll try getting the diagram again.

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Date: Mon, 07 Jun 1999 20:00:42 PDT
From: Joe Mitchell
Subject: FTE Perf - FTE PERF - Header question

I have two questions about headers. First, a friend of mine has an 84 F-150
w/ a set of headers. The headers are close to ten years old. He asked me if
headers ever wore out? I told him i didn't know but i'd ask, so do they? :)
Second, do "header wraps" really work? And what exactly to they help? Thanks
in advance...
- --
Joe
- --
91 Ranger - Awaiting 351 (two weeks till installed...)


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------------------------------

Date: Mon, 07 Jun 1999 23:32:10 -0500
From: "Robert F. Davis"
Subject: Re: FTE Perf - 0.40 over

At 08:24 AM 06/07/99 -0500, you wrote:
>What would the formula be for a .040 over 302?
>Thanks
>Ed Saunders 86 F-150 302
>
The formula stays the same. ie; (Bore x Bore x Stroke x # of cyls x .7854)

The .7854 is one fourth of PI. but to me, .7854 is much easier to remember
since those numbers are in the upper LH corner of the keypad & clockwise
to boot.

SO a 302 Ford (and some others) that is .040" OS is:

4.040" x 4.040" x 3" x 8 x.7854 = 307.6556 cu.in.
(or almost 308, which happens to be one of my favorite calibers).

Hope this helps.

"Beater" Bob




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Date: Mon, 07 Jun 1999 22:26:45 -0700
From: Vogt Family
Subject: FTE Perf - Re: 0.40 over

On Sun, 6 Jun 1999, rich may wrote:
>
> I was wondering what the displacement of a 351 Windsor would be after
> being bored 40 over.

A whopping 358.7. And considering that a 351 is really 352 (same bore
and stroke as FE, just changed the number to differentiate it) that
makes all the less difference. Better ways to go for horsepower in my
opinion.

(Bore Diameter/2) ^ 2 * Stroke * # Cylinders
4.084 * 3.50 * 8

Birken
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