perf-list-digest Thursday, September 24 1998 Volume 01 : Number 098



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Ford Truck Enthusiasts - Performance
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In this issue:

RE: FTE Perf - Cam break-in
RE: FTE Perf - Inital Engine Startup after rebuild.
RE: FTE Perf - Cam break-in - Now Seating Rings
RE: FTE Perf - Inital Engine Startup after rebuild.
RE: FTE Perf - Cam break-in - Now Seating Rings
RE: FTE Perf - Inital Engine Startup after rebuild.
RE: FTE Perf - Cam break-in - Now Seating Rings
RE: FTE Perf - Inital Engine Startup after rebuild.
RE: FTE Perf - Cam break-in - Now Seating Rings
RE: FTE Perf - Cam break-in - Now Seating Rings
RE: FTE Perf - Valve springs
RE: FTE Perf - Inital Engine Startup after rebuild.
RE: FTE Perf - C6 Wide Gears
[none]
RE: FTE Perf - Cam break-in - Now Seating Rings
RE: FTE Perf - Valve springs

=======================================================================

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 09:58:39 +0000
From: "Gary, 78 BBB"
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Cam break-in

From: Sleddog
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Initial Engine Startup after Rebuild
Date sent: Wed, 23 Sep 1998 23:56:31 -0400

> starting and stopping an engine during cam break in is not good at all.
> and if you stall it, get it started ASAP again! and don't forget to

I agree. When you first start it up you have the assy lube in there to protect
it but after running even for a few seconds it is washed out and needs the
continuous flow of fresh oil to protect it. Cam lobes have a 1 degree angle
on them to spin the lifters and to reduce the actual friction forces (ok,
traction, not friction) or should I say resistance to sliding forces so the
"pressure" applied to the surfaces is very extreme due to this angle which is
why proper break in is so important. Every time you restart you are starting
the cam lobe on virtually a bare metal surface because the "force" of the
valve springs push the lob against the lifter with so much "pressure" it
squeezes all the oil out. This causes a very slight scratching of the surface
which will cause premature wear because the rubbing of the two surfaces will
wear the scratches back out so each time you do this it scratches some more
and then polishes them back out etc..

After 20 minutes of running the surfaces have polished each other so
scratching is minimized or eliminated and they wear very slowly after that.

A son-in-law only takes part of a daughter away,
Dad keeps the best part :-)

- -- Gary --


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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 08:35:19 -0700
From: Keith Srb
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Inital Engine Startup after rebuild.

Forwared for George Miller



From: George
To: "'perf-list ford-trucks.com'"
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Inital Engine Startup after rebuild.
Date: Wed, 23 Sep 1998 14:50:36 -0700

For start-up purposes, the Edelbrock Carb should be fine right out of the
box. As others have mentioned, just plug all the vacuum lines.
Comp Cams lists several roller cams for the FE series.

George Miller



>At 03:38 PM 9/23/98 -0400, you wrote:
>>what you need to do, is get it running and be sure to do the break in
>>properly! use an older carb that works if you need to, forget vacuum.
>> disconnect the timing vacuum, and anything nonessential.
>
>I was planning on getting an engine from the junk yard minus the intake and
>carb, to save some money. I don't have the room to store any extra parts,
>so I don't have an older carb that works. As a matter of fact, I don't even
>have an enclosed area where I can put the motor together, which bothers me
>a lot. But that is a different story. I will be using and aluminum manifold
>and Edelbroke 4 barrel. So how does that change things????
>
>>this breakin is just one reason i want to only ever run roller cams from
>>now on ;)
>
>I would like to run a roller cam too, but try and find one for an FE!
>
>Later
>Keith
>
>
>
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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 09:02:19 -0700
From: Keith Srb
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Cam break-in - Now Seating Rings

At 09:58 AM 9/24/98 +0000, you wrote:
>From: Sleddog
>Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Initial Engine Startup after Rebuild
>Date sent: Wed, 23 Sep 1998 23:56:31 -0400
>
>> starting and stopping an engine during cam break in is not good at all.
>> and if you stall it, get it started ASAP again! and don't forget to
>
>I agree. When you first start it up you have the assy lube in there to
>protect
>it but after running even for a few seconds it is washed out and needs the
>continuous flow of fresh oil to protect it. Cam lobes have a 1 degree angle
>on them to spin the lifters and to reduce the actual friction forces (ok,
>traction, not friction) or should I say resistance to sliding forces so the
>"pressure" applied to the surfaces is very extreme due to this angle which
is
>why proper break in is so important. Every time you restart you are
starting
>the cam lobe on virtually a bare metal surface because the "force" of the
>valve springs push the lob against the lifter with so much "pressure" it
>squeezes all the oil out. This causes a very slight scratching of the
surface
>which will cause premature wear because the rubbing of the two surfaces will
>wear the scratches back out so each time you do this it scratches some more
>and then polishes them back out etc..
>
>After 20 minutes of running the surfaces have polished each other so
>scratching is minimized or eliminated and they wear very slowly after that.

O.K. Now I have another question. What will breaking in the cam in this
fashion do the piston rings. After running the engine like this for 20
minuets, why should I drive the truck "easy" for the first 1000 miles, I.E.
give the engine a chance to get broke in. What else is there to break in??

Thanks!
Keith Srb


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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 12:08:44 -0400
From: Sleddog
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Inital Engine Startup after rebuild.

finding roller cams for almost any engine is not too hard, but affording
them is. the cost of tossing in a roller is extreme, for any engine not
originally equiped with one. for engines that don't have ones available,
they can generally be adapted, but cost is extremely higher.

i was thinking this year of going to a bigger cam, mine is too small. but
at $300+ for what i want, i may not do it. especially after i was told my
valvesprings might last 2 seasons if i am lucky. they ain't cheap either!

later.
sleddog

- ----------
From: Keith Srb[SMTP:herbie ford-trucks.com]
Sent: Thursday, September 24, 1998 11:35 AM
To: perf-list ford-trucks.com
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Inital Engine Startup after rebuild.

Forwared for George Miller



From: George
To: "'perf-list ford-trucks.com'"
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Inital Engine Startup after rebuild.
Date: Wed, 23 Sep 1998 14:50:36 -0700

For start-up purposes, the Edelbrock Carb should be fine right out of the
box. As others have mentioned, just plug all the vacuum lines.
Comp Cams lists several roller cams for the FE series.

George Miller



>At 03:38 PM 9/23/98 -0400, you wrote:
>>what you need to do, is get it running and be sure to do the break in
>>properly! use an older carb that works if you need to, forget vacuum.
>> disconnect the timing vacuum, and anything nonessential.
>
>I was planning on getting an engine from the junk yard minus the intake
and
>carb, to save some money. I don't have the room to store any extra parts,
>so I don't have an older carb that works. As a matter of fact, I don't
even
>have an enclosed area where I can put the motor together, which bothers me
>a lot. But that is a different story. I will be using and aluminum
manifold
>and Edelbroke 4 barrel. So how does that change things????
>
>>this breakin is just one reason i want to only ever run roller cams from
>>now on ;)
>
>I would like to run a roller cam too, but try and find one for an FE!
>
>Later
>Keith
>
>
>
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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 12:19:20 -0400
From: Sleddog
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Cam break-in - Now Seating Rings

what kind of rings? moly, moly coated, or cast iron?

iron takes forever to break in, moly(and moly coated) should break in in
the first few minutes AFAIK.

all new parts that move need breaking in. rockers, included. some are
more important than others. i always heard to run a fresh engine at
different rpms, not holding it at one speed on the highway for long. best
reason i can think of for this is the splash oiling that oils many of the
parts goes in different directions at different rpms. and as parts wear
in, they make heat and need cooling oil to stay cool.

my 460 in my 77 was run only about 30 minutes before getting multiple WFO
passes on the pull track. 20 for cam break in, and 10 on/trailer, and thru
the pits on to the scale, and onto the track.

my last one, the 521 for the new pull truck (still no pictures, sorry) got
about 45 minutes on it before it's first pull, and maybe an hour and 10
minutes before it's first WFO pull. i put it thru multiple hot/cold cyc
les. with no flat tappets to break in, i just ran it till hot, and then
cooled it a few times to break in things like head gaskets, rings, etc. and
check for any leaks or loosening bolts.

the oil pan bolts still ended up getting loose during my best pull (see
WWW site for details) checking bolts and leaks seem to be important parts
of breakin to me.

sleddog

- ----------
From: Keith Srb[SMTP:herbie ford-trucks.com]
Sent: Thursday, September 24, 1998 12:02 PM
To: perf-list ford-trucks.com
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Cam break-in - Now Seating Rings


O.K. Now I have another question. What will breaking in the cam in this
fashion do the piston rings. After running the engine like this for 20
minuets, why should I drive the truck "easy" for the first 1000 miles, I.E.
give the engine a chance to get broke in. What else is there to break in??

Thanks!
Keith Srb


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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 09:32:53 -0700
From: Keith Srb
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Inital Engine Startup after rebuild.

At 12:08 PM 9/24/98 -0400, you wrote:
>finding roller cams for almost any engine is not too hard, but affording
>them is. the cost of tossing in a roller is extreme, for any engine not
>originally equiped with one. for engines that don't have ones available,
>they can generally be adapted, but cost is extremely higher.
>
>i was thinking this year of going to a bigger cam, mine is too small. but
>at $300+ for what i want, i may not do it. especially after i was told my
>valvesprings might last 2 seasons if i am lucky. they ain't cheap either!
>
>later.
>sleddog

The reason your valve springs would only last two seasons is, High RPMS,
and amount of lift your would be running, correct?

I assume (I hate doing that) that running a roller cam in a street engine
would prolong the life of the valve springs, correct?

Thanks
Keith

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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 13:36:04 +0000
From: "Gary, 78 BBB"
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Cam break-in - Now Seating Rings

From: Sleddog
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Cam break-in - Now Seating Rings
Date sent: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 12:19:20 -0400

> iron takes forever to break in, moly(and moly coated) should break in in
> the first few minutes AFAIK.

Ever try to machine Molybdenum? Only material I know of that's tougher is
pure Tungsten (I've ground both). Moly has good porosity for oil control
and is very tough which are the two main reasons they use it I believe. The
instructions I got with my moly rings and the text book both said they are
hard to break in compared to cast iron rings but easier than chrome. They
also specified a very narrow cross hatch ranges and grit size for proper
preparation of the cylinder walls. It's been 15 years since I built that engine
and took that class so I could be mistaken but that's how my old, beat up
brain is remembering it??

A son-in-law only takes part of a daughter away,
Dad keeps the best part :-)

- -- Gary --


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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 13:46:02 -0400
From: Sleddog
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Inital Engine Startup after rebuild.

a streetable smaller cam would not have to have the springs replaced like
that, having reliablitly like any flat tappet. it is the extreme lobe
shape of the cam, creating high acceleration forces and abusive dynamics on
the springs.

mine are tool steel springs - can't run engine hard untill the engine is at
least 150 deg. or so or the springs will break. with my current cam, i may
get more life from the springs, but they are used, and by someone who had
over .800 lift and a prostock cam grind. (as are many of my parts! the
crank/rods/pistons are the only new hard parts in my engine not including
gaskets and bearings)

problem, is do i replace the springs? or wait tilll they break, requiring
possible a whole engine rebuild including pistons, rods, crank, block, etc.

one thing i have learned, is that when people who build these kinds of
engines like mine, or more, talk of reliability, they are talking in terms
of runs, or laps. not miles or years like a street engine. it takes
getting used to. how many *runs* can i get out of these lifters and
springs? instead of how many miels will this cam go before it starts
wiping itself down?

sleddog

- ----------
From: Keith Srb[SMTP:herbie ford-trucks.com]
Sent: Thursday, September 24, 1998 12:32 PM
To: perf-list ford-trucks.com
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Inital Engine Startup after rebuild.

At 12:08 PM 9/24/98 -0400, you wrote:
>finding roller cams for almost any engine is not too hard, but affording
>them is. the cost of tossing in a roller is extreme, for any engine not
>originally equiped with one. for engines that don't have ones available,
>they can generally be adapted, but cost is extremely higher.
>
>i was thinking this year of going to a bigger cam, mine is too small. but
>at $300+ for what i want, i may not do it. especially after i was told my
>valvesprings might last 2 seasons if i am lucky. they ain't cheap either!
>
>later.
>sleddog

The reason your valve springs would only last two seasons is, High RPMS,
and amount of lift your would be running, correct?

I assume (I hate doing that) that running a roller cam in a street engine
would prolong the life of the valve springs, correct?

Thanks
Keith

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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 13:52:19 -0400
From: Sleddog
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Cam break-in - Now Seating Rings

oems use the iron for a longer break in period (safer)
moly is faster, when the bore is honed correctly. problem with moly is
that it is also just as easy to screw up, burnishing the cylinder wall and
ring - never getting ring seal.

imagine if a race engine took 15,000 miles to break in like a stock engine
from the manufacturer. mark martin would be driving all winter long to
break in next years engine! moly is hard, and maybe that is why it
"finishes machining the bore" so quickly. and yes, it does hold oil
better.

sleddog

- ----------
From: Gary, 78 BBB[SMTP:gpeters3 ford.com]
Sent: Thursday, September 24, 1998 9:36 AM
To: perf-list ford-trucks.com
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Cam break-in - Now Seating Rings

From: Sleddog
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Cam break-in - Now Seating Rings
Date sent: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 12:19:20 -0400

> iron takes forever to break in, moly(and moly coated) should break in in
> the first few minutes AFAIK.

Ever try to machine Molybdenum? Only material I know of that's tougher is
pure Tungsten (I've ground both). Moly has good porosity for oil control
and is very tough which are the two main reasons they use it I believe.
The
instructions I got with my moly rings and the text book both said they are
hard to break in compared to cast iron rings but easier than chrome. They
also specified a very narrow cross hatch ranges and grit size for proper
preparation of the cylinder walls. It's been 15 years since I built that
engine
and took that class so I could be mistaken but that's how my old, beat up
brain is remembering it??

A son-in-law only takes part of a daughter away,
Dad keeps the best part :-)

- -- Gary --


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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 13:50:52 +0000
From: "Gary, 78 BBB"
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Cam break-in - Now Seating Rings

Date sent: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 09:02:19 -0700
From: Keith Srb
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Cam break-in - Now Seating Rings

> O.K. Now I have another question. What will breaking in the cam in this
> fashion do the piston rings. After running the engine like this for 20
> minuets, why should I drive the truck "easy" for the first 1000 miles,

Before the rings are broken in they do not fully seal so there is some oil
consumption and blow by but it should be minimal if you did a good job. If
you apply a heavy load on the rings before they have fully seated the gasses
bypassing the rings can be very hot which will soften the material in the
vicinity allowing more wear to occur than desireable. This of course is
counter productive to getting them to seal so we drive calmly for a while to
give them a chance to seal evenly all the way around or limit our spurts to
short duration spurts and no WOT stuff for the first 1000 miles.

Off road equipment is different in that we don't have time to put that kind of
mileage on them before racing them so we build them with the idea of
replacing a few parts now and then but most will still try to get some break in
laps at less than full blast if possible before really getting on it.

A son-in-law only takes part of a daughter away,
Dad keeps the best part :-)

- -- Gary --


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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 14:05:25 +0000
From: "Gary, 78 BBB"
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Valve springs

Date sent: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 09:32:53 -0700
From: Keith Srb
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Inital Engine Startup after rebuild.

> The reason your valve springs would only last two seasons is, High RPMS,
> and amount of lift your would be running, correct?

All physical material has what is known as an elastic limit which is the point
beyond which it will not return to it's original shape but there is an element of
physics that modifies the elastic limit called heat. Not the kind we think of on
the outside but from the friction of the molecules within the springs as they
are bent back and forth. As long as we stay below both of these thresholds
the spring will last indefinitely but the moment we surpass either one for even
an instant the spring is permanently reconfigured.

New springs have a certain margin built in for operating the valves so they
can deteriorate a bit before they become dangerous to the engine. The
further you bend them and the faster you cycle them the more of the two
detrimental physical rules affect them so the shorter the life span.

If you rev it for a few seconds now and then to pass traffic and put most of
the miles/hours on it at cruise speed the springs will last a long time if
properly designed for the application but on the strip or pulling track virtually
all the hours are at high rpms so..............

We can reduce this break down somewhat by using multiple springs with
thinner wire. Thinner wire does two things for us, allows for deeper cycling
(higher lift) with less heat build up and allows higher lift without coil bind.
Some setups use as many as 3 springs per valve and perhaps even more (but
I haven't heard of any using more than 3)

A son-in-law only takes part of a daughter away,
Dad keeps the best part :-)

- -- Gary --


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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 14:20:42 +0000
From: "Gary, 78 BBB"
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Inital Engine Startup after rebuild.

From: Sleddog
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Inital Engine Startup after rebuild.
Date sent: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 13:46:02 -0400

> problem, is do i replace the springs? or wait tilll they break, requiring
> possible a whole engine rebuild including pistons, rods, crank, block,
> etc.

I have no racing experience but my experience with springs tends to say they
will either break or not depending on the original heat treatment process. If
they survived his hammering chances are they won't "ever" break but I'd
check the spring pressure at what ever compression height you need to
check and make sure they all are close to what you need because they can
lose their strength over time which usuallly means they also lose some length
or take a set. If you inspected them for strength and length before installing
them you should be OK but I only know one person capable of predicting
the outcome for a certainty and he aint on this list :-)


A son-in-law only takes part of a daughter away,
Dad keeps the best part :-)

- -- Gary --


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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 11:52:54 -0700
From: Keith Srb
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - C6 Wide Gears

Forwarded for George Miller

From: George
To: "'perf-list ford-trucks.com'"
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - C6 Wide Gears
Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 09:41:31 -0700

I'm also waiting to hear an answer on this one. The SVO catalog states =
that the wide ration C6 kits use current production 7.5 E4OD trans =
components. Any C6/E4OD experts out there?

George Miller

- ----------
>From: Vogt Family[SMTP:vogt oro.net]
>Sent: Saturday, September 19, 1998 9:44 PM
>To: perf-list ford-trucks.com
>Subject: FTE Perf - C6 Wide Gears
>
>Well, it is about time to start thinking about putting the wide gears
>into my C6. Being of the limited finances, I was wondering if it would
>be worth my time to find a defunct E4OD or if I pretty much have to go
>with the SVO kit?
>
>Birken
>FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html
>

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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 11:54:49 -0700
From: Keith Srb
Subject: [none]

Forwarded for George Miller

From: George
To: "'perf-list ford-trucks.com'"
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Cam break-in - Now Seating Rings
Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 09:48:40 -0700

A good question. Most of the crate engines, including C*#y's HiPo line =
of which kajillions are sold, just say drive it and change oil after the =
first 500 miles. Because of moly rings and production honing?

George Miller

>----------
>From: Keith Srb[SMTP:herbie ford-trucks.com]
>Sent: Thursday, September 24, 1998 9:02 AM
>To: perf-list ford-trucks.com
>Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Cam break-in - Now Seating Rings
>
>At 09:58 AM 9/24/98 +0000, you wrote:
>>From: Sleddog
>>Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Initial Engine Startup after Rebuild
>>Date sent: Wed, 23 Sep 1998 23:56:31 -0400
>>
>>> starting and stopping an engine during cam break in is not good at =
>all.=20
>>> and if you stall it, get it started ASAP again! and don't forget to
>>
>>I agree. When you first start it up you have the assy lube in there to =
>
>>protect=20
>>it but after running even for a few seconds it is washed out and needs =
>the=20
>>continuous flow of fresh oil to protect it. Cam lobes have a 1 degree =
>angle=20
>>on them to spin the lifters and to reduce the actual friction forces =
>(ok,=20
>>traction, not friction) or should I say resistance to sliding forces so =
>the=20
>>"pressure" applied to the surfaces is very extreme due to this angle =
>which
>is=20
>>why proper break in is so important. Every time you restart you are
>starting=20
>>the cam lobe on virtually a bare metal surface because the "force" of =
>the=20
>>valve springs push the lob against the lifter with so much "pressure" =
>it=20
>>squeezes all the oil out. This causes a very slight scratching of the
>surface=20
>>which will cause premature wear because the rubbing of the two surfaces =
>will=20
>>wear the scratches back out so each time you do this it scratches some =
>more=20
>>and then polishes them back out etc..
>>
>>After 20 minutes of running the surfaces have polished each other so=20
>>scratching is minimized or eliminated and they wear very slowly after =
>that. =20
>
>O.K. Now I have another question. What will breaking in the cam in this
>fashion do the piston rings. After running the engine like this for 20
>minuets, why should I drive the truck "easy" for the first 1000 miles, =
>I.E.
>give the engine a chance to get broke in. What else is there to break =
>in??
>
>Thanks!
>Keith Srb
>
>
>

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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 14:46:49 -0400
From: Sleddog
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Cam break-in - Now Seating Rings

i have with every thing i have ever built, or bouhgt new, drove it the way
i will always drive it, but also do full throttle short blasts with engine
brakeing coastdowns. the coasting sucks oil into the hot rings and cleans
the "grindings" away. never had a ring seal problem except with one turbo
motor (not real bad though, pretty minor in one cylinder - was used car
though)

sleddog

- ----------
From: Gary, 78 BBB[SMTP:gpeters3 ford.com]
Sent: Thursday, September 24, 1998 9:50 AM
To: perf-list ford-trucks.com
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Cam break-in - Now Seating Rings

Date sent: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 09:02:19 -0700
From: Keith Srb
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Cam break-in - Now Seating Rings

> O.K. Now I have another question. What will breaking in the cam in this
> fashion do the piston rings. After running the engine like this for 20
> minuets, why should I drive the truck "easy" for the first 1000 miles,

Before the rings are broken in they do not fully seal so there is some oil
consumption and blow by but it should be minimal if you did a good job. If
you apply a heavy load on the rings before they have fully seated the
gasses
bypassing the rings can be very hot which will soften the material in the
vicinity allowing more wear to occur than desireable. This of course is
counter productive to getting them to seal so we drive calmly for a while
to
give them a chance to seal evenly all the way around or limit our spurts to
short duration spurts and no WOT stuff for the first 1000 miles.

Off road equipment is different in that we don't have time to put that kind
of
mileage on them before racing them so we build them with the idea of
replacing a few parts now and then but most will still try to get some
break in
laps at less than full blast if possible before really getting on it.

A son-in-law only takes part of a daughter away,
Dad keeps the best part :-)

- -- Gary --


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------------------------------

Date: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 14:47:59 -0400
From: Sleddog
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Valve springs

that 2nd, or third spring is a dampner, not a spring.

sleddog

- ----------
From: Gary, 78 BBB[SMTP:gpeters3 ford.com]
Sent: Thursday, September 24, 1998 10:05 AM
To: perf-list ford-trucks.com
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Valve springs

Date sent: Thu, 24 Sep 1998 09:32:53 -0700
From: Keith Srb
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Inital Engine Startup after rebuild.

> The reason your valve springs would only last two seasons is, High RPMS,
> and amount of lift your would be running, correct?

All physical material has what is known as an elastic limit which is the point
beyond which it will not return to it's original shape but there is an element of
physics that modifies the elastic limit called heat. Not the kind we think of on
the outside but from the friction of the molecules within the springs as they
are bent back and forth. As long as we stay below both of these thresholds
the spring will last indefinitely but the moment we surpass either one for even
an instant the spring is permanently reconfigured.

New springs have a certain margin built in for operating the valves so they
can deteriorate a bit before they become dangerous to the engine. The
further you bend them and the faster you cycle them the more of the two....


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