perf-list-digest Monday, August 17 1998 Volume 01 : Number 061



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Ford Truck Enthusiasts - Performance
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In this issue:

Re: FTE Perf - Expected gas mileage?
RE: FTE Perf - Re: It's alive
RE: FTE Perf - Re: It's alive
FTE Perf - Inside door handle
[none]
FTE Perf - RE: temps
Re: FTE Perf - RE: temps
RE: FTE Perf - RE: temps
FTE Perf - K&N filters,PLDV1 #60
Re: FTE Perf - K&N filters,PLDV1 #60
FTE Perf - Inside door handle
Re: FTE Perf - Inside door handle
Re: FTE Perf - RE: temps

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Date: Sun, 16 Aug 1998 10:04:29 +0000
From: Garr&Pam
Subject: Re: FTE Perf - Expected gas mileage?

Steve & Rockette wrote:
>
> >truck from the NM MVD. The weight shown on the registration is 3,200 pounds.
> >Could that be right?
> >This subscriber mentions "close to 5,000 lbs of truck" certainly a large
> >discrepancy. Which weight is right for this truck?

just FYI I ask my dad what kind of mileage he is getting in his 94
Econoline 150(302 auto) and he is getting 15! This is a work truck that
is always carrying weight(enought that they had to add 3/4 ton springs
to his truck) and he doesn't putt putt either!!!
Chris
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------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Aug 1998 10:50:53 -0400
From: Sleddog
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Re: It's alive

i was thinking maybe an old ford courier with tubbed backend and 4 link. a
lenco tranny and instead of my p-o-s intake a set of 750 holley DP's on top
of a sheetmetal tunnel ram with a 125 HP nitrous shot. i think that'll be
fun!

but, then again i think how much fun it would be if after i take it out of
the pull truck to make room for a new 600+ cid in the future, i could set
it between the rails of a stripped f-350 for some serious mud bogs and sand
drags.

or how bout a cobra kit car?

maybe a fox body mustang? always wanted to try to build a salt flats car.
course if i could afford a winged car i'd use that, but . . . .

sleddog

ps-i wouldn't let anyone borrow the engine, but there is always a price for
everything!

- ----------
From: John Pajak[SMTP:jspajak yahoo.com]
Sent: Saturday, August 15, 1998 1:01 PM
To: perf-list ford-trucks.com
Subject: FTE Perf - Re: It's alive

Congrats Sleddog on your creation! I think when you get the
jetting straight it'll run a bit cooler.
Hey, can I borrow the engine, drop it in my 68 Fairlane wagon and
make a few 1.4 mile passes? :)


==
"2 + 2 = 5 for sufficiently large values of 2"

John Pajak
Lexington Park, Maryland

Check out our Oldsmobiles and more at
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://members.tripod.com/~JSPajak
_________________________________________________________
DO YOU YAHOO!?

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------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Aug 1998 10:51:43 -0400
From: Sleddog
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - Re: It's alive

1.4 is maybe how long it would take to slow down, without power brakes and a parachute :)

sleddog

- ----------
From: John Pajak[SMTP:jspajak yahoo.com]
Sent: Saturday, August 15, 1998 1:07 PM
To: perf-list ford-trucks.com
Subject: Re: FTE Perf - Re: It's alive

make a few 1.4 mile passes? :)

I meant 1/4 mile passes! Durn typos!



==
"2 + 2 = 5 for sufficiently large values of 2"

John Pajak
Lexington Park, Maryland

Check out our Oldsmobiles and more at
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://members.tripod.com/~JSPajak
_________________________________________________________
DO YOU YAHOO!?

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------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Aug 1998 10:59:11 EDT
From: WmRobinso aol.com
Subject: FTE Perf - Inside door handle

Fellow readers:

Without notice the passenger-side interior door handle of my '94 F-150
suddenly became very hard to operate. (It almost feels like it's catching on
something inside the door.)

I looked it up in my "Haynes Repair Manual" but found nothing in there about
the inside door handle.

Does anyone know what to do for this problem? Should the in-door mechanical
parts be lubricated with white lithium grease -- or just what should be done?
An application of WD-40 on the exposed door latch and striker did nothing to
alleviate the problem.

- ---------
P.S. This is the same truck that a question about it's weight came up in
earlier mailings. I have received notes from readers telling me of weights
for their trucks ranging from 3200 lbs. to "almost 5000 lbs!" Quite a range,
wouldn't you say?

To find out definitively once and for all I will have it weighed on a public
scale.

Bill Robinson
Albuquerque, NM
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------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Aug 1998 10:35:50 -0700
From: "George"
Subject: [none]

Sleddogs recent comments about the operating temp on his new engine made me
think about a Fordinatics thread I followed. In that thread, it was said
that constant engine temps of 210-220 degrees under moderate to heavy loads
are no problem. A 192 degree thermostat begins to open at that temp, which
means your engine temp is already over 200 degrees.

Not in the thread but along those lines, a 50/50 mixture of coolant/water
and a 15lb pressure cap will provide boilover protection to 265 degrees.
The auxiliary cooling fan sensors on newer pieces don't even come on until
225 degrees.

Have I been wrong in getting excited when my temp gauge (not a sensor)
approaches 220 degrees with the a/c on while idling in the summer desert?

George Miller



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------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Aug 1998 13:56:45 -0400
From: Sleddog
Subject: FTE Perf - RE: temps

it ain't bad for a street engine, but cool water, and hot oil make power,
and also 185-195 deg or so is best for ring seal and life AFAIK.

when my temp gauge hits 235, i know that the heat in the back of the heads
is ALOT hotter than that as the gauge gets its reading from the cool end of
the engine!

sleddog

- ----------
From: George[SMTP:maga55 ix.netcom.com]
Sent: Sunday, August 16, 1998 1:35 PM
To: Ford-performance

Sleddogs recent comments about the operating temp on his new engine made me
think about a Fordinatics thread I followed. In that thread, it was said
that constant engine temps of 210-220 degrees under moderate to heavy loads
are no problem. A 192 degree thermostat begins to open at that temp, which
means your engine temp is already over 200 degrees.

Not in the thread but along those lines, a 50/50 mixture of coolant/water
and a 15lb pressure cap will provide boilover protection to 265 degrees.
The auxiliary cooling fan sensors on newer pieces don't even come on until
225 degrees.

Have I been wrong in getting excited when my temp gauge (not a sensor)
approaches 220 degrees with the a/c on while idling in the summer desert?

George Miller



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------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Aug 1998 11:02:41 -0700
From: "George"
Subject: Re: FTE Perf - RE: temps

Then I should go from a 180 thermostat to a 195 to increase the radiator
cooling ability. I know oil needs to be over 220 just to eliminate the water
byproduct from combustion but what's considered ideal?.

George Miller


it ain't bad for a street engine, but cool water, and hot oil make power,
and also 185-195 deg or so is best for ring seal and life AFAIK.

when my temp gauge hits 235, i know that the heat in the back of the heads
is ALOT hotter than that as the gauge gets its reading from the cool end of
the engine!

sleddog

- ----------
From: George[SMTP:maga55 ix.netcom.com]
Sent: Sunday, August 16, 1998 1:35 PM
To: Ford-performance

Sleddogs recent comments about the operating temp on his new engine made me
think about a Fordinatics thread I followed. In that thread, it was said
that constant engine temps of 210-220 degrees under moderate to heavy loads
are no problem. A 192 degree thermostat begins to open at that temp, which
means your engine temp is already over 200 degrees.

Not in the thread but along those lines, a 50/50 mixture of coolant/water
and a 15lb pressure cap will provide boilover protection to 265 degrees.
The auxiliary cooling fan sensors on newer pieces don't even come on until
225 degrees.

Have I been wrong in getting excited when my temp gauge (not a sensor)
approaches 220 degrees with the a/c on while idling in the summer desert?

George Miller



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------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Aug 1998 15:12:23 -0400
From: Sleddog
Subject: RE: FTE Perf - RE: temps

not sure of the ideal. will eventually find out though, as i want to put
an oil temp gauge on it.

some day i hope to have gauges also for O2, head temp, exhaust temp,
manifold vacuum (need to tap a hole) and volts/amps and a memory tacj for
the wheel speed.

sleddog

- ----------
From: George[SMTP:maga55 ix.netcom.com]
Sent: Sunday, August 16, 1998 2:02 PM
To: perf-list ford-trucks.com
Subject: Re: FTE Perf - RE: temps

Then I should go from a 180 thermostat to a 195 to increase the radiator
cooling ability. I know oil needs to be over 220 just to eliminate the
water
byproduct from combustion but what's considered ideal?.

George Miller


it ain't bad for a street engine, but cool water, and hot oil make power,
and also 185-195 deg or so is best for ring seal and life AFAIK.

when my temp gauge hits 235, i know that the heat in the back of the heads
is ALOT hotter than that as the gauge gets its reading from the cool end of
the engine!

sleddog


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------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Aug 1998 19:39:45 GMT
From: cdailey hhs.state.ne.us (Chad Dailey)
Subject: FTE Perf - K&N filters,PLDV1 #60

Hey, George! I'm not trying to start a flame war here, but my direct
experience with K&N filters is *less* oil contamination. I have tried
them (K&N's) in three cars and a truck, and all had much lighter
colored oil at the same change intervals under similar conditions
(same: driver, ambient, oil brand, oil filter). Did you oil your air
filter properly? On one of my cars, I routinely had pitch-black oil
at change time before the K&N. After the second oil change with the
K&N, it settled into a nice transparent tortoiseshell / amber color at
change time.

I haven't torn apart any of the engines in question, so actual wear
measurements weren't taken, but I feel a heck of a lot better being
able to see *through* my oil.

Does anyone know of oil analysis labs we could do a testo-comparo with
on the sly?

Chad

P.S.: I used stock paper elements before I used the K&N filters.

>Date: Sat, 15 Aug 1998 06:52:41 -0700
>From: "George"
>Subject: Re: FTE Perf - K&N Filters
>
>They do work and provide the best high-flow filtering I've seen. My =
issue is
>that there's a price for that flow on street applications; increased oil
>contamination. For the racer after that last HP and ft lb of torque, =
that's
>not a problem as rebuilds are part of the game. If I were running pure
>competition, I'd use K&N. I was joshing Gary on the oil treatments and =
plugs
>after his reply about the marketing vocabulary (microns, one million =
miles,
>etc.) K&N and many other firms use.
>
>George Miller

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------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Aug 1998 13:40:20 -0700
From: "George"
Subject: Re: FTE Perf - K&N filters,PLDV1 #60

Checked it dirty (it's supposed to work better that way) and clean, freshly
oiled with their oil. Same driving conditions and the Fram paper element
still kept the oil cleaner. I was very surprised. This is a modified 460
w/Edelbrock 750cfm.and I run it real hard.

You can have almost any garage that does heavy diesel repairs send your oil
for analysis. Don't know what the current cost is.

George Miller

Hey, George! I'm not trying to start a flame war here, but my direct
experience with K&N filters is *less* oil contamination. I have tried
them (K&N's) in three cars and a truck, and all had much lighter
colored oil at the same change intervals under similar conditions
(same: driver, ambient, oil brand, oil filter). Did you oil your air
filter properly? On one of my cars, I routinely had pitch-black oil
at change time before the K&N. After the second oil change with the
K&N, it settled into a nice transparent tortoiseshell / amber color at
change time.

I haven't torn apart any of the engines in question, so actual wear
measurements weren't taken, but I feel a heck of a lot better being
able to see *through* my oil.

Does anyone know of oil analysis labs we could do a testo-comparo with
on the sly?

Chad

P.S.: I used stock paper elements before I used the K&N filters.

>Date: Sat, 15 Aug 1998 06:52:41 -0700
>From: "George"
>Subject: Re: FTE Perf - K&N Filters
>
>They do work and provide the best high-flow filtering I've seen. My issue
is
>that there's a price for that flow on street applications; increased oil
>contamination. For the racer after that last HP and ft lb of torque, that's
>not a problem as rebuilds are part of the game. If I were running pure
>competition, I'd use K&N. I was joshing Gary on the oil treatments and
plugs
>after his reply about the marketing vocabulary (microns, one million miles,
>etc.) K&N and many other firms use.
>
>George Miller

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------------------------------

Date: 16 Aug 1998 15:07:58 EDT
From: Hawk sktc.net
Subject: FTE Perf - Inside door handle

PE>Fellow readers:

PE>Without notice the passenger-side interior door handle of my '94 F-150
PE>suddenly became very hard to operate. (It almost feels like it's catching o
PE>something inside the door.)

PE>I looked it up in my "Haynes Repair Manual" but found nothing in there about
PE>the inside door handle.

PE>Does anyone know what to do for this problem? Should the in-door mechanical
PE>parts be lubricated with white lithium grease -- or just what should be done
PE>An application of WD-40 on the exposed door latch and striker did nothing to
PE>alleviate the problem.


Had a similar problem on a 95. The sheet metal that the handle is
anchored to gave up. The handle would have to get all of the slop out
of the sheet metal, then start operating the latch. Take off the inside
of the door to see if you have the same problem. This post isn't too
performance oriented, is it? Buck Shoff


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------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Aug 1998 14:54:39 -0700
From: "George"
Subject: Re: FTE Perf - Inside door handle

The door handle and a 302 gas mileage question were the first
non-performance posts I've seen on it.

George Miller

Had a similar problem on a 95. The sheet metal that the handle is
anchored to gave up. The handle would have to get all of the slop out
of the sheet metal, then start operating the latch. Take off the inside
of the door to see if you have the same problem. This post isn't too
performance oriented, is it? Buck Shoff


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------------------------------

Date: Sun, 16 Aug 1998 15:47:17 -0700
From: "George"
Subject: Re: FTE Perf - RE: temps

Are you running an oil cooler?

George Miller


not sure of the ideal. will eventually find out though, as i want to put
an oil temp gauge on it.

some day i hope to have gauges also for O2, head temp, exhaust temp,
manifold vacuum (need to tap a hole) and volts/amps and a memory tacj for
the wheel speed.

sleddog

- ----------
From: George[SMTP:maga55 ix.netcom.com]
Sent: Sunday, August 16, 1998 2:02 PM
To: perf-list ford-trucks.com
Subject: Re: FTE Perf - RE: temps

Then I should go from a 180 thermostat to a 195 to increase the radiator
cooling ability. I know oil needs to be over 220 just to eliminate the
water
byproduct from combustion but what's considered ideal?.
....


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