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fordtrucks-digest Digest Volume 97 : Issue 112

Today's Topics:

Re: something's not right.. [Chris North ]
RE: something's not right.. [Randy Collins ]
Help with engine repair [Mark Goods
47 one ton wiring harness [Jeff Hazewinkel
Re: Mercury trucks? [Chris James
Re: 47 one ton wiring harness Reply ["Wagger" ]
Re: 47 one ton wiring harness [JRFiero aol.com ]
RE: F150 Hesitation ?? [Phil Conrad
Re: 47 one ton wiring harness [TNickolson aol.com ]
Re: 80 MPG???? Beg to differ Sir. ["C.D. Mutch"
100mpg How-To ["C.D. Mutch"

Administrivia:

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Message distributed via http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.lofcom.com/
For help send mail with subject "HELP" to:fordtrucks-digest-request lofcom.com
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____________________________________________________________________


------------------------------

Date: Mon, 12 May 1997 22:29:29 -0500 (CDT)
From: Chris North
To: fordtrucks lofcom.com
Subject: Re: something's not right..
Message-Id:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

After my first post on this thread I thought I would let it die, but it
won't so...

Steve Delanty pretty much says it. I would like to add the following:

>Hey Harry and Jim and all,
>

>
>>We all no what a PCV does, but think about how it works.
>
>O.K.
>
>>
>>First, what are the gases that are being vented? It is "blow by", which
>>is hot
>>(hot air going into the intake=less power) and it is exhaust gases
>>(remember,
>>most blow by occures on the power stroke).
>
>Yes there is spent exhaust gas. But much less than You might think. A very
>large percentage is still unburnt gases.

I do have a problem with the idea that the gasses being vented are "HOT".
(Although Steve mentions this) By the time the blowby gets to the PCV
valve, these gasses are nowhere near the 1200+ Deg F of the exhaust. They
are more like the 180 deg F oil/coolant temp. Lower than that since they
have been diluted with fresh air.

>

>
>*Only* unburnt gases get by on compression, and *mostly* unburnt gases get
>by on power stroke.

A very important point, although it confuses some people.


>>
>>When does the most blow by occur? At WOT!
>
>Yep. That's for sure.
>
>>The PCV is hooked to engine vacuum. This produces good vacuum at low speeds
>(yet
>>little blow by) and no or very little vacuum at WOT (and the most blow by).
>
>Yes, this also is true.
>>
>>What I am saying is the PCV works the most when it is needed the least
>>and the
>>least when it is needed the most.

You are forgetting that little item called a PCV valve. It closes at high
vacuum and opens at low vacuum. This means, at idle (high vacuum, little
blowby) you have low flow. At low vacuum (WOT, most blowby) the valve
opens to allow more flow. In addition to this neat feature, the PCV valve
also meters the amount of air introduced into the intake, in effect making
a 'controlled vacuum leak' that can be adjusted for in the design of the
carburetor.
>
>But remember that under WOT even if the manifold vacuum isn't pulling gases
>out fast enough, the "intake" vent on the crankcase is vented to the air
>cleaner so that unburnd gases are still pulled in to the motor for a
>second try.
>Both vents return gases to the intake one way or another...
>
>>Not to mention the system is dumping HOT
>>Exhaust gases into the intake system which DECREASES MPG and inturn
>>INCREASES
>>pollution (you use MORE gas)!
>
>Again, most of the gases are not really "exhaust gases". It's largely unburnt.
>The real problem is, as You say, they are HOT. This is definately bad.
>But remember that these gases are a very small percentage of the total
>intake gases unless Your motor is toasted. And it is largely good, usable
>fuel/air mix although it is heated up some.
>

I do have a problem with that word "HOT". Put your hand on the PCV line
from the valve cover to the carb and you will find that it is not that HOT.
(But yes, hot is bad, it's just not that hot)

>>
>>My thinking is that a PCV system hooked to the exhaust would create the most
>>vacuum when needed (at WOT) and less when not (at lower speeds).
>
>Yes, this works fine for extracting gases from the crankcase. One problem is
>that it just spews the goods out the tailpipe as unburned HCO, unless You
>use an air pump and catalytic converter after it.
>

Yes, this does work fine. It has been used in marine applications for
years (not a new idea). I don't think they use it any more, but thereis
usually a check valve to prevent exhaust from entering the crankcase. But,
remember, a marine application is very different than a street motor.
Sustained WOT operation is the norm for a marine application. Not many
street motors operate at WOT for very long. Street motors do operate at
1/3 throttle or less (high vacuum) for most of their operation.


>
>>
>>PLUS, if blow by is basicaly exhaust gases why wouldn't it be possible to
>place
>>as "little" in-line cat-converted to *filter* the PCV gases

Here is part of the problem. Blowby is NOT basically exhaust gasses.

>
>Unfortunately the gases aren't nearly hot enough to combine with O2 in a
>seperate cat.

You see, I told you they weren't all that HOT.


>intake manifold PCV is such a simple, effective system that it's pretty hard
>to beat for automotive applications.
>It really does provide significant reduction in unburned HCO to the
>atmosphere for a very low cost. Only a minimal amount of "retuning" is
>necessary to make it work correctly.
>

The only other thing I want to add is that PCV systems pre-date auto
emissions control. Positive Crackcase Ventilation was introduced to
improve the life of the motor oil (and, consequently the engine) and was
used extensively when there were no emission control requriements. The
fact that it reduces emissions is a 'freebie'.


Chris North | I always think I'm right although I know that |
Metallurgist | I must be wrong sometimes, I think. |

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 12 May 1997 22:01:28 -0700
From: Randy Collins
To: "'fordtrucks lofcom.com'"
Subject: RE: something's not right..
Message-ID:
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Steve,

I enjoyed your post on PCV systems. It answers most things I suspected =
but don't have the automotive experience to comment on. Thanks....

Randy Collins
Boise, Idaho
rcollins micron.net

1975 Ford Supercab Longbed Muscle Truck (mostly in pieces)
Soon to have the following Randy installed options:
F250 4WD 460 C-6
but I will try to have it ready this coming weekend.
I would like to jump back in again on the PCV subject tho...

>I do NOT want to argue, but if you want to hear the rest of my idea =
then here it=20



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Date: Tue, 13 May 1997 09:59:54 -0400
From: Mark Goods
To: "'fordtrucks lofcom.com'"
Subject: Help with engine repair
Message-ID:

To anyone who can help;

What are some suggestions on replacing the oil pan gasket and the rear main
seal on a 1968 F100 that has a 351C 4V in it? I have access to an engine
hoist and I will buy and engine stand if I have to. I was told that these
repairs can be done without removing the engine. Is that so? Also, I would
like to keep the cost down on repairs to this truck until I get it running
pretty good. If I had to take the engine out, then I would want to redo it
completely which cost more money that I have to spend on that right now.
Any suggestions are welcome.

Mark
1968 F100, in need of some TLC.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 13 May 1997 09:36:45 -0500
From: Jeff Hazewinkel
To: fordtrucks
Subject: 47 one ton wiring harness
Message-id:
Content-type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

Does anyone know of a supplier for a wiring harness for a 47 one ton ?
If not, I would be interested in a source for a good diagram.

Jeff

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 13 May 1997 09:35:35 -0700
From: Chris James
To: fordtrucks lofcom.com
Subject: Re: Mercury trucks?
Message-ID:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

> If someone knows of a post-50s Mercury pickup truck, I'd like
> to see it. Come to think of it, I've never seen a Mercury truck
> in person, nor a good detailed picture. Are there any on line?
>
> Ron
>
I don't have any pictures on my computer but i used to own a '67 Mercury
100. The only difference from a Ford that I noticed was the Merc emblems
and the 16" rims.


Chris

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 13 May 1997 14:25:52 -0600
From: "Wagger"
To:
Subject: Re: 47 one ton wiring harness Reply
Message-Id:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi,
I found a really good source for ALL wiring needs, they are Ron Francis
Wire works, they even sent me a free full color Cat. I think their Add. is
www.Ron Francis or Wireworks.com. If not just go to your search engine and
enter "Wire Works.
Their kind of pricey but have things I haden't even heard of. They can
design a harness for anything and have excellent on-line tech help. I want
one of their harnesses but don't have the cash to get one right now, but
will. They have been building harnesses since the early '80s. Good luck
Charlie Sr. 1965 F-250 390
Charlie Jr.1964 F-100 223

----------
> From: Jeff Hazewinkel
> To: fordtrucks
> Subject: 47 one ton wiring harness
> Date: Tuesday, May 13, 1997 8:36 AM
>
> Does anyone know of a supplier for a wiring harness for a 47 one ton ?
> If not, I would be interested in a source for a good diagram.
>
> Jeff
>
>
> ____________________________________________________________________
> Message distributed via http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.lofcom.com/
> For help send mail with subject "HELP" to:fordtrucks-request lofcom.com
> Comments and suggestions are welcome, use: kpayne mindspring.com

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 13 May 1997 17:47:29 -0400 (EDT)
From: JRFiero aol.com
To: fordtrucks lofcom.com
Subject: Re: 47 one ton wiring harness
Message-ID:

Try Rhode Island Wiring - you'll find them easily with a web search by that
name. Hold onto your wallet when you start adding up the catalog prices,
however. Not sure its that much different than other suppliers, but I almost
choked earlier today when I added up what I need. Ron Francis wiring has
harnesses which don't duplicate original, depends what you need.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 13 May 1997 17:44:18 -0700
From: Phil Conrad
To: "'fordtrucks lofcom.com'"
Subject: RE: F150 Hesitation ??
Message-Id:
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I'm still working on trying to find out what the secondary circuit is =
and where it is located on my truck, 92, F150 302, auto trans. Also, I =
had someone tell me that the EVP sensor might be bad. Would I get a =
code for this or is this a dead end.

One last thing. I went back to my Ford dealer, not to get any work done =
just to get copies of my recommended repair ticket, and found that the =
tech is recommending that I replace my aft sender and mid sender on the =
fuel system. I've been under this truck allot and don't recall anything =
other then lines going straight to the engine from the tanks.

Thanks for your help in advance.

Phil Conrad.=20

----------
From: JIM HURD[SMTP:HURDJ VAX.CS.HSCSYR.EDU]
Sent: Wednesday, May 07, 1997 11:31 AM
To: fordtrucks lofcom.com
Subject: Re: F150 Hesitation ??


Phil,
Good job! Let me look up your codes (from my arm chair!).

Okay, you already know that the 111 says you passed the self-test with
flying colors. Next, the "continuous memory" codes, meaning that at
some prior time the EEC-IV saw this problem and stored the code for you:

327 =3D PFE/DPFE circut below minimum. (The PFE is a Pressure Feedback =
Egr
sensor that measures the exhaust gas pressure in the EGR system.)
Do you have a modified exhaust system, by chance? Or maybe the=20
sensor is "hooped"?

542 =3D Fuel pump secondary circuit failure. (Bet this is your =
hesitation.)

634 =3D MLP (Manual Lever Position) sensor volatage out of self-test
range on E40D. =20

Now for the KOER tests:

during the dynamic response test you have a:

129 =3D Insufficient MAF (Mass Air Flow) change during dynamic response =
test.
(You have to snap the throttle to WOT when you get the "goose" =
code.
More on that in a later code.) The reason the 129 went away on =
your
next test is you probably gossed it a little harder.

167 =3D Insufficient TP (Throttle Position) change during DRT (Dynamic
Response Test). You need to go to full throttle so that the EEC-IV
can verify the limits of the TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) =
voltage.

225 =3D Knock not sensed during DRT. You need to "snap" the throttle to
WOT. The EEC-IV wants the engine to "ping" so that it can check =
out
the knock sensor circuit (but you probably won't be able to hear
the ping with just your ear.)

632 =3D OverDrive cancel switch (OCS) not changing state (E4OD). I need =
some
help here. I don't have an E4OD tranny. Do you? Is it shifting =
into
OD properly, and shifting out of OD okay?

To clear the continuous memory codes, disconnect the battery for about =
10
minutes........Good Luck.

Jim in Central NY
'79 F-150 (302!)
'92 Topaz (3.0l)


____________________________________________________________________
Message distributed via http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.lofcom.com/
For help send mail with subject "HELP" to:fordtrucks-request lofcom.com
Comments and suggestions are welcome, use: kpayne mindspring.com




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------ =_NextPart_000_01BC5FC5.4AFB23E0--

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 13 May 1997 21:37:19 -0400 (EDT)
From: TNickolson aol.com
To: fordtrucks lofcom.com
Subject: Re: 47 one ton wiring harness
Message-ID:

Try Chris Olson with Class Tech. He made me a couple items that look original
and his price was fair. Phone number is 1-800 874-9981 or fax 1-541-389-4441.
I am not positive about the fax number. His shop is in Oregon. Let me know if
he can take care of your needs.

Tom Nickolson

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 13 May 1997 21:27:11 -0700
From: "C.D. Mutch"
To: fordtrucks lofcom.com
Subject: Re: 80 MPG???? Beg to differ Sir.
Message-ID:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

OK Boys & Girls, warm up your printers Ďcuz Iím gonna give you a crash
course in how to get 100 mpg. Everything Iím explaining here is in
fairly simple terms so forgive me if I donít get into heavy detail. If
you want more details go to the himac website I referred to in my
earlier posts. This is what instigated most of my research.
First of all, you have to understand the process of TCC or Thermal
Catalytic Cracking. This is the process used by oil refineries to break
down heavy crude into the lighter fuels and lubricants which are
utilized by typical internal combustion engines. Now understanding that
yes... because crude oil can, and is broken down into lighter elements,
liquid petroleum fuel can also be broken down into lighter fuel elements
using the same process-BUT REMEMBER... simply boiling the gas into a
vapour will not work. This is a chemical process which requires a
CATALYST. In order to properly crack the liquid petroleum and all the
additives added by the oil companies, the liquid fuel is can be boiled
into a vapour by an exhaust heated heat exchanger. My plan involves
using the exhaust manifolds as heat exchangers. The boiled fuel can then
be stored in a primary vapour chamber. The fuel which either does not
boil or condenses in the primary chamber can be returned to the fuel
tank via fuel return line. The vaporous fuel from the primary chamber is
then sent to a secondary chamber made of iron (the iron acts as the
catalyst) where it is heated electrically to 500 degrees Celsius and
mixed with steam. The chemical process taking place in the catalytic
chamber is best explained in the words of Bruce McBurney
ď"When the steam and gasoline vapour enter the iron chamber the water is
broken down, and the oxygen forms with the carbon, creating methanol.
The hydrogen forms with the hydrocarbon, cracking it into the finer
form, natural gas."Ē
If you want to do the chemical math the end result is like this...
C8H16+H2O=CH3OH+C1H4.
This is where the problem is. Getting the steam and fuel both mixed and
delivered in the proper proportions for burning in the combustion
chamber.
Every system that has worked and has been patented and then ďbought outĒ
by any large corporation such as Ford, GM, or Shell Oil, understood and
utilized this process. Itís extremely efficient and this is why with a
vapour carb system, you wonít find any raw fuel blubbering out your
tailpipe. Scientific research available at any library will support the
fact that methanol and natural gas burns more efficiently and with less
emissions than liquid petroleum. Anyone wishing to debate me or help me
with anything Iíve stated here in certainly welcome. If we can work
together, we might just save our planet yet.

C.D. Mutch

--
Friends may come and go, but enemies accumulate.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 13 May 1997 21:40:16 -0700
From: "C.D. Mutch"
To: fordtrucks lofcom.com
Subject: 100mpg How-To
Message-ID:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

OK Boys & Girls, warm up your printers Ďcuz Iím gonna give you a crash
course in how to get 100 mpg. Everything Iím explaining here is in
fairly simple terms so forgive me if I donít get into heavy detail. If
you want more details go to the himac website I referred to in my
earlier posts. This is what instigated most of my research.
First of all, you have to understand the process of TCC or Thermal
Catalytic Cracking. This is the process used by oil refineries to break
down heavy crude into the lighter fuels and lubricants which are
utilized by typical internal combustion engines. Now understanding that
yes... because crude oil can and is broken down into lighter elements,
liquid petroleum fuel can also be broken down into lighter fuel elements
using the same process-BUT REMEMBER... simply boiling the gas into a
vapour will not work. This is a chemical process which requires a
CATALYST. In order to properly crack the liquid petroleum and all the
additives added by the oil companies, the liquid fuel is can be boiled
into a vapour by an exhaust heated heat exchanger. My plan involves
using the exhaust manifolds as heat exchangers. The boiled fuel can then
be stored in a primary vapour chamber. The fuel which either does not
boil or condenses in the primary chamber can be returned to the fuel
tank via fuel return line. The fuel vapour from the primary chamber is
then sent to a secondary chamber made of iron (the iron acts as the
catalyst) where it is heated electrically to 500 degrees Celsius and
mixed with steam. The chemical process taking place in the catalytic
chamber is best explained in the words of Bruce McBurney
ď"When the steam and gasoline vapour enter the iron chamber the water is....


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