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Content-Type: text/plain

fordtrucks-digest Digest Volume 97 : Issue 143

Today's Topics:

Re: mileage/electronic ignition how [Daver ]
Re: fordtrucks-digest Digest V97 #92 [allan britney ]
Re: Rising Temp 2 [Daver ]
Re: Rising Temp 2 [Daver ]
Wheel Bearings ["The Zahns"
'78 F150 [reedg ns2.cetlink.net ]
hemi in a ford [jstandle oregontrail.net ]
Re: hemi in a ford [John MacNamara ]
Re: Rising Temp 2 [sdelanty sonic.net ]
Re: mileage/electronic ignition how [sdelanty sonic.net ]
Re: Wheel Bearings [LanceWaldn aol.com ]
Re: Rising Temp 2 (more info) ["George Shepherd"
Re: Rising Temperature... [sdelanty sonic.net ]
Re: Rising Temperature... [Chris North ]
Re: hemi in a ford [Chris North ]
Lye Warning (was Re: Rising Temp 2) [Chris North ]
Re: 460 cu. in. [William Sabers
RE: '78 F150 [Kevin Kemmerer ]

Administrivia:

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Message distributed via http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.lofcom.com/
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------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Jun 1997 20:01:35 -0500
From: Daver
To: fordtrucks lofcom.com
Subject: Re: mileage/electronic ignition how 2
Message-ID:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

> The '77 and later duraspark system in trucks doesn't appear to use a resistor.
> If You have a '77 or later setup, just use the appropriate coil, get rid of
> the resistor and use the coil+ wire to switch the red wire.
>
> Happy Motoring,
>
> Steve Delanty (sdelanty sonoma.net)
>
> 1971 F100, FE390, T-18 4-speed shortbox.

The older trucks used a resistor wire inlue of a resistor it works fine
as long a you keep corrosion down mine gave up so I replaced it with a
resistor. As long as you wire through the harness you should have no
problem.

FYI the porpose of the resistor is to cut the voltage back from 12 or 13
volts to +/- 9 volts Mallory uses 9.5 volts consult with the mfg of your
egnition system. If you want to see were you are start the vehical and
test the battery side of the coil while it is running being carful not
to let it BITE you.

Molater

Daver

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Jun 1997 18:04:27 -0700 (PDT)
From: allan britney
To: fordtrucks lofcom.com
Subject: Re: fordtrucks-digest Digest V97 #92
Message-Id:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

to the fellow with the over heating problem...chek your timing

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Jun 1997 20:14:33 -0500
From: Daver
To: fordtrucks lofcom.com
Subject: Re: Rising Temp 2
Message-ID:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
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Clark Gustafson wrote:
>
> I am beginning to be sorry I even wrote for assistance, I didn't mean for
> you guys to get in a (pardon the wording) heated discussion over it. I
> would however like to know what the symptoms of a lean running engine are.
> I was also wondering if there is any chance that if I install a electric
> fan that it may help. And is there any way a person can check the
> performance of a water pump w/o teardown and removal of such. Well I am
> still heating up (outside hump in "P" on TEMP) only after traveling a short
> distance (25 mi) and have no clue. Again any HELP would be appreciated.
> Thanks again, Griz.

You know I once experienced a heat problem I could not fid and later
descovered The cam had rolled a lobe a little at a time and ate the
bottom off an exhaust lifter so the gasses made it into the cylinder and
combusted but they wern't getting out so they caused overheating.

Molater

Daver

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Jun 1997 20:26:23 -0500
From: Daver
To: fordtrucks lofcom.com
Subject: Re: Rising Temp 2
Message-ID:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
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I used radiator flush (Don't
> use it) that ate mine, it also ate the water outlet. With
> your radiator out flush it out with water, then clean out
> the fins of all the crap that builds up in there. and
> reinstall using a new thermostat (I used a 180 degree).

> Jim Strigas

I don't know if anyone is interested; but, I use the old style Draino in
a small metal can. It will eat the crap and leave the radiator all it
is, is staight lye great stuff. Put the contints of the can into the
radiator start it and bring it up to temp then shut it down and let it
cool then drain and flush.

Molater

Daver

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Jun 1997 18:39:16 -0700
From: "The Zahns"
To: "FORD TRUCK MESSAGE To:"
Subject: Wheel Bearings
Message-Id:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hello All,
I always wondered about how tight to tighten the front wheel bearings on
my truck and van. Usually I just tighten it down real snug, loosen it up
1/4 turn and then snug again. I can't find anything in the manuals about
if I need to torque them down or whatever. There seems to be a lot of
mechanical experience on this list so I was hoping to learn something new.
The rear wheels also have fluid bearings with a 2 9/16th inch nut holding
the axle on and I just snug them down too.
FRED
71 F350 429
89 E350 460
94 Tbird 3.8
89 Corsica how did this chevy get in here
96 Taurus 3.0

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Jun 1997 21:46:18 +0000
From: reedg ns2.cetlink.net
To: fordtrucks lofcom.com
Subject: '78 F150
Message-Id:
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

I don't know a whole lot about Ford trucks, most of my experience is
with german cars. But it's time I moved up. Would it be worth it to
fix up a '78 F150 Custom SB 4x4? Body is in reasonable shape.
Transfer case probably needs rebuilding. Even though the shifter goes
full range the transmission will not engage unless it is in 4 wheel
low. What exactly is a 351M 400CID?

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Jun 1997 18:56:55 +0000
From: jstandle oregontrail.net
To: fordtrucks lofcom.com
Subject: hemi in a ford
Message-Id:
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

hey,

I have just come apon a guy that might be interested in selling me
his 426 Hemi. Has anyone put one of these in a pickup before? The
truck it will be going into has a 1979 ford 1/2 ton frame. This
might be more than I'm looking for, but if its not too much of an
extremity, I might go for it. That is, if I get a good enough deal
on it. From the way he talks, the hemi is more of a motor than he
would ever want to own. hahaha.

Jordan- 1956 Ford/1979 ford chassis

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Jun 1997 19:24:39 -0700
From: John MacNamara
To: fordtrucks lofcom.com
Subject: Re: hemi in a ford
Message-Id:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

jstandle oregontrail.net wrote:
>
> hey,
>
> I have just come apon a guy that might be interested in selling me
> his 426 Hemi. Has anyone put one of these in a pickup before? The
> truck it will be going into has a 1979 ford 1/2 ton frame. This
> might be more than I'm looking for, but if its not too much of an
> extremity, I might go for it. That is, if I get a good enough deal
> on it. From the way he talks, the hemi is more of a motor than he
> would ever want to own. hahaha.
>
> Jordan- 1956 Ford/1979 ford chassis
>
> ____________________________________________________________________
> Message distributed via http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.lofcom.com/
> For help send mail with subject "HELP" to:fordtrucks-request lofcom.com
> Comments and suggestions are welcome, use: kpayne mindspring.com
Jordan: For whatever it's worth, a Chrysler Hemi weighs an additional
300 lbs over a normal big block. So be prepared to do some suspension
work. Otherwise, find a good tire dealer. Just my .02.

Thanks! John MacNamara

78 F250 4x4 Supercab
67 GT500
656 Corvette 427

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Jun 1997 20:19:56 -0700
From: sdelanty sonic.net
To: FORDTRUCKS lofcom.com
Subject: Re: Rising Temp 2
Message-Id:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>> I am beginning to be sorry I even wrote for assistance, I
>didn't mean for
>> you guys to get in a (pardon the wording) heated
>discussion over it.
>
> Don't, we need to learn to be tolerant of others. If we
>can't ask for assistance without heated discussion as a
>result, then let it be for sport! Ask, sit back and enjoy
>the flames!

Naw, no flames. I don't want any bad thoughts or words against anybody.

It's just people with different veiws and understandings of how things work.
I posted what I believe to be true about cooling.
If George believes it's wrong, then that's OK. I may be wrong.
I'm hoping He'll elaborate a little more, or steer me towards some good
books so I'll be smarter next time.
Tell my why it's wrong...


Pull your water pump and look to see if the impeller
>(thanks for the name Steve). I used radiator flush (Don't
>use it) that ate mine, it also ate the water outlet.

Yes, I have also seen water pumps where the fins were nearly entirely
missing, eaten away by corrosion. You may be able to see by pulling the hose
off and looking in with a flashlight.



The other question is does it show any other symptoms of overheating?
Excessive pinging?
Puking of coolant?
Does it really seem hotter than normal? Or could it just be the temp sendor
or gauge is bad?

Happy motoring,

Steve Delanty (sdelanty sonic.net)

1971 F100, FE390, T-18 4-speed shortbox.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Jun 1997 20:20:00 -0700
From: sdelanty sonic.net
To: FORDTRUCKS lofcom.com
Subject: Re: mileage/electronic ignition how 2
Message-Id:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>Hi Steve!
> I have a '73 F100 and my electronic ignition is from a '77
>Mercury. My starter relay has 4 wires, 1 from the battery
>and 1 to the starter. The other 2 are the ones I used.
>Red\blue 12v key to start is where I spliced the white wire

Jim,

Yeah, that's a good place for the white wire.


>and brown 12v key on is where I spliced the red wire. There
>is no resistor on my truck.

Well, I can't seem to find a schematic for that, but traditionally that
brown wire on the starter relay comes from the junction of the resistor and
the coil.
The wire gets voltage *thru* the resistor when the ign switch is on, but is
energized by the starter relay when cranking to eliminate the resistor and
give full batt voltage to the coil during cranking.

In the stock system, anything connected to this wire is getting its current
thru the resistor except during cranking.

>The red\green wire running to
>the coil acts as the resistor and was eliminated with the
>electronic ignition.
>BTW the red\green wire comes off the
>brown wire so I considered it to be before the resistor.

Hmm, I know nothing of this red\green wire. Is it in the engine compartment
or under the dash?

On my '71 the ign +12 wires in the engine bay were brown...
Where does this red/green wire connect?

> Well Bro, how's it look? Electricity and me do not get
>along (We just don't understand each other)! I looked at the
>wiring diagram a hundred times, used a test light and
>multimeter to come up with this when I installed the
>ignition.

Well, I guess I'm not sure.. I don't know about any red/green resistor wire
in them newfangled '73 models, but as long as You are sure the resistor is
gone from the circuit, then it's wired O.K.
It sounds like it works fine, so I'd say You done good... (-:

>While on the subject of ignition, what the hell
>does dielectric do and why is it so important that I put it
>on every time I pull a plug wire?

The dielectric grease is a good insulating material. It seals between the
plug insulator and the rubber boot on the wire to prevent the spark energy
from leaking across the outside of the plug especially in wet conditions.
It keeps moisture out of the boot where a) it's conductive and shorts out
Your spark, and b) water trapped in the boot can wick up the plug wire
braid and rot out the last few inches of conductor in Your fancy expensive
wires..
Also, c) The grease is a good lubricant, so the plug boots slide on and off
easier with less chance of damage to the wire.

It's agood idea to use it, allthough (embarrassed cough..) I don't bother
with it.
I don't live where it's particularly wet nor do I go offroading or let my
plug insulators (or motor!) get dirty so I don't worry much about it.

There is another kind of dielectric grease that is thermally conductive, and
is used under electronics parts and ign modules and etc to help transfer
heat away from them.


Happy motoring,

Steve Delanty (sdelanty sonic.net)

1971 F100, FE390, T-18 4-speed shortbox.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Jun 1997 23:31:54 -0400 (EDT)
From: LanceWaldn aol.com
To: fordtrucks lofcom.com
Subject: Re: Wheel Bearings
Message-ID:

I don't know if I'm right but I have never had a bearing failure.
First I tighten the wheel nut fairly tight with a pair of slip joint pliers.
Then I spin the wheel to make sure that nothing is binding. Next I back off
the nut about 1/8 a turn and put on the retainers.
I'm nor sure but I think I learned that in high school auto shop. Sorry Mr.
Luft if that's wrong.
Lance

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Jun 1997 22:38:09 -0500
From: "George Shepherd"
To:
Subject: Re: Rising Temp 2 (more info)
Message-Id:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Are you really sure it runs too hot and is not just a guage problem. Have
you checked it out with a temperature probe you know to be accurate?

----------
> From: Clark Gustafson
> To: Ford Truck Mailing List
> Subject: Rising Temp 2 (more info)
> Date: Monday, June 23, 1997 4:15 PM
>
> It's me again, I Have totally replaced the radiator with a new one just
> recently, and I am still heating up as I said before ( p in TEMP ). I
> checked and I don't have a head gasket problem, thanks for the great
info,
> Steve. When I went to buy coolant at the parts store the Parts dude told
> me that I would need two gallons for my radiator so thats what I used, is
> that to much? And like I ask earlier, is there any symptoms of a bad
water
> pump, I can open the cap and see water moving in the radiator but not at
> like warp speed I would think it should be moving w/o the thermostat....I
> don't know. Is it real hard to change the freeze plugs, can I do it
myself
> or does it require removal of engine? I was thinking of putting in a
flex
> fan too, I don't know what the hell to do, Darn thing runs to good to
give
> up! Just one little problem, and its fustrating as hell! Well I will
pull
> the water pump and see, Thanks again for the info, Keep on Truckin' .
> Thanks , Griz.
>
>
> ____________________________________________________________________
> Message distributed via http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.lofcom.com/
> For help send mail with subject "HELP" to:fordtrucks-request lofcom.com
> Comments and suggestions are welcome, use: kpayne mindspring.com
>

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Jun 1997 20:57:06 -0700
From: sdelanty sonic.net
To: FORDTRUCKS lofcom.com
Subject: Re: Rising Temperature...
Message-Id:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

> If the engine is running
>high RPM then obviuosly the fluid is traveling much faster; therefore,
>under common conditions the thermostat is used to accomplish this and in
>extream conditions we who run, high performance stuff, lots of RPM's use
>a smaller crank pully to drive the water pump to slow it down.

Is the smaller pulley used to change the rate of heat transfer in the block
or radiator?
Or to reduce problems with Pump cavitation at high rpms?


Happy motoring,


Steve Delanty (sdelanty sonic.net)

1971 F100, FE390, T-18 4-speed shortbox.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Jun 1997 23:37:27 -0500 (CDT)
From: Chris North
To: fordtrucks lofcom.com
Subject: Re: Rising Temperature...
Message-Id:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Daver wrote:
>
>I have serveral problems with Crisis argument George is correct.

OK guys, when your spelling and grammar get so bad that somebody can't even
figure out what you are trying to say, you are babeling, not communicating.
I realize that this is a cheap shot, but it is hard for me to rebut
messages I cannot understand. (By the way, I failed spelling in grammar
school...regularly. If spelling ability had been a requirement for
graduation, I never would have made it to high shcool, let alone college.)

Having that out of the way, I would like to ask Daver exactally what
problems he has with my argument and what George is correct about. My
argument was:

I don't want to step on any toes, but I'm sorry, the myth "[removing the
thermostat] can actually make they engine hotter since the water flow
is so
fast it doesn't get a chance to cool in the radiator" is a hot button for
me. This is bunk.

George made absolutely no comments to refute this argument, and neither has
Daver (If either of you, or anyone else, has one or more problems with
this, please let me know). To support this claim, I went on to say:

The radiator is a liquid-gas (with air being the gas) heat excahnger. The
faster either fluid (yes, air is a fluid) flows, the more efficient the
heat excanger becomes. This is because in all fluid flow, there is a
'boundary layer' of fluid against the walls (of the radiator) that impedes
heat flow. The faster the flow, the thinner the 'boundary layer'; the
thinner the 'boundary layer', the better the heat transfer.

Now, maybe this is what causes the problems.

You
>are dealing with a subject that I am experienced in and the Boundry
>layer can only exist if you have a laminar flow through the tubes.

This is news to me. I had been taught that when a fluid is in contact with
a solid, there is _always_ a boundary layer. In the case of turbulent
flow, it may be only a few atom layers thick, but it is still there.

I am
>a Piping Designer by trade been doing this and related work for about 15
>years and heat exchange is one of the primary things you deal with in
>Crude refining. You can effectivly increase the rate of heat exchange
>by varing the speed at which the fluid runs through the radiator;
^^^^^^
I thought that this is what _I_ said, except I would have used 'increasing'
instead of varing (do you mean varying?)

>however, there is a minimum and a maximum flow at either end that must
>be maintained to accomplish correct cooling.

OK. Even though I am not sure what you mean by 'correct cooling' I can
agree that there is a minimum flow that must be maintained (with no flow,
you aren't going to do any cooling). I do have a problem with the maximum
flow part, though. Assuming we are not talking about such high velocities
where frictional heating and/or cavitation occur in the radiator, I am not
aware of any phenomena which would cause the faster flowing fluid to
decrease the rate of heat exchange. There is a point where increasing the
flow would not bring about a signifigant increase in the heat transfer rate
(fully turbulent flow), as well as a point where an increase in pressure
across the radiator would not provide for a signifigant increase in flow,
but neither of these would decrease the rate of heat transfer, they would
just slow (or stop) the rate of increase.

If the engine is running
>high RPM then obviuosly the fluid is traveling much faster;

Not so. The pump is running faster, but the coolant is only traveling as
fast as the thermostat will permit.

therefore,
>under common conditions the thermostat is used to accomplish this and in
>extream conditions we who run, high performance stuff, lots of RPM's use
>a smaller crank pully to drive the water pump to slow it down.

Again, not so. The smaller crank pully is used to (1) slow the speed of
the belts down, reducing the likelyhood of throwing a belt [not a good
thing], and (2) reduce the torque the accessories put on the motor,
allowing more power to go to the tranny.

>
>Cris if the boundry layer did exist it is not moving;

The boundary layer does exist and, depending of the velocity (really, the
Reynolds number) of the fluid, different parts of it have varying speeds.

thus, it does not
>accomplish any thing.

Well, it does accomplish at least one thing, it impedes heat transfer.

there is a speed difference between inner and
>outer streem in a round tube but it is a very insucnificant difference
>and radiators do not have round tubes.

These differences in speed exist regardless of the geometry of the tube.
Again, you really have to look at the Reynolds number to determine how
signifigant it is.

>
>If a thermostat is funtioning properly and is properly sized to the
>coolant system it doesn't simply open and stay opened, it opens allowing
>the water in the block to enter the radiator and as that happens the
>cooler water from the radiator enters the block as this cooler water
>contacts the thermostat it closes stoping the flow of water until such
>time as the water in the block becomes hot enough to open it again. My
>67 carries a 190 thermostat and doesn't exceed 190 it really only holds
>190 for a few seconds and I can watch the gauge (an actual termometer or
>mecanical gauge) and see it drop off rapidly back to 180 in the summer
>and 175 in the winter then slowly rise back to 190.

Typically, once the engine and coolant reach a 'steady state' (as in
crusing down the highway for 30 minutes or so) the thermostat _will_ open
slightly and stay open so that flow through the radiator will dissipate the
same amount of heat that is absorbed in the engine.

>
>If anyone wants the name of a good fluid mechanics book I can get it for
>you.
>

My Fluid Dynamics professor always told me that fluid mechanics were known
as plumbers and that the science of fluid flow was known as Fluid Dynamics.

>Molater
>
>Daver
>

I would also suggest a text on Heat Transfer, as that is really the subject
at hand.

Chris North | I always think I'm right although I know that |
Metallurgist | I must be wrong sometimes, I think. |

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 23 Jun 1997 23:51:41 -0500 (CDT)
From: Chris North
To: fordtrucks lofcom.com
Subject: Re: hemi in a ford
Message-Id:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>hey,
>
> I have just come apon a guy that might be interested in selling me
>his 426 Hemi. Has anyone put one of these in a pickup before? The
>truck it will be going into has a 1979 ford 1/2 ton frame. This
>might be more than I'm looking for, but if its not too much of an
>extremity, I might go for it. That is, if I get a good enough deal
>on it. From the way he talks, the hemi is more of a motor than he
>would ever want to own. hahaha.
>
>Jordan- 1956 Ford/1979 ford chassis
>

I really think that a 1/2 ton (even a Ford) frame would have trouble with
the torque the elephant motor would put out. The cars Chrysler put the
HEMI motors in had a specially designed frame and suspension to handle the
motor. That is why the HEMI cars fetch such a high price--they are a lot
more than your standard 'Cuda with a 426 shoehorned in. In addition to
frame and suspension, think about electrical, brakes, and fuel systems.
Not to mention the tranny, clutch, and rear end. Chrysler put a Dana 60
behind the HEMI's. The Ford 9" is a great rear, but a HEMI will break it.
In addition, parts for the HEMI cost 4 times standard Chrysler parts, which
cost 1.5 times that of Ford parts.

Now, I do know a guy with a 69 R/T HEMI car that might be interested.

chris north

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jun 1997 01:35:04 -0500 (CDT)
From: Chris North
To: fordtrucks lofcom.com
Subject: Lye Warning (was Re: Rising Temp 2)
Message-Id:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I am sorry if I come off as being a bit hard, but, in my professional
opinion, this is really not good advice.

>I don't know if anyone is interested; but, I use the old style Draino in
>a small metal can. It will eat the crap and leave the radiator all it
>is, is staight lye great stuff. Put the contints of the can into the
>radiator start it and bring it up to temp then shut it down and let it
>cool then drain and flush.
>

Perhaps not the best idea. First of all, old style Draino in a small metal
can is not straight lye. It has aluminum chips in it that react with the
highly caustic solution formed when the lye dissolves in the water, which
generates a fair amount of heat (useful in uncloging drains that contain
cold grease). These small aluminum chips can get lodged in a radiator tube
or worse. In addition, if there are any aluminum parts in your cooling
system, the highly caustic lye solution will literally eat them up,
releasing large amounts of hydorgen gas in the process (not something you
want under your hood). While the caustic solution will do a very good job
of cleaning the iron block, I am not sure what effect it will have on the
brass radiator and/or heater core and associated solder joints (I'll have
to look that up at work tomorrow).

While some people may have had success with using Draino in this
application, I would not recommend it because of the harm it will do to any
aluminum (and perhaps other metal) parts it could come in contact with.
Also, caustic solutions are not very fun things to work with. If you get
some in your eye, it will probably blind you. If you get it on your skin,
you will have a nasty chemical burn. If you swallow it, you die. I
consider caustics to be more dangerous than acids because (1) most people
have a healthy respect for acids, but not caustics for some reason, and (2)
caustics are very difficult to wash off (they form a type of soap with your
skin oils that will literally wash away your skin).

As for a chemical agent to clean your cooling system, I recommend one of
the commercially available products. These are specially formulated by
teams of PhD chemists to clean the deposits that form in cooling systems
while being safe to use. If this does not clean the radiator well enough,
take it to a radiator shop and have it rodded out or replace it with a
new/remanufactured radiator. I have heard of some people replacing the
core of a 60's style radiator with a modern, high-efficiency core which
will provide increased cooling capability while retaining the clasic look
of the original radiator.

Chris North | I always think I'm right although I know that |
Metallurgist | I must be wrong sometimes, I think. |

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 24 Jun 1997 08:36:02 -0500 (CDT)
From: William Sabers
To: fordtrucks lofcom.com
Subject: Re: 460 cu. in.
Message-ID:
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

> William Sabers wrote:
> >
> > Does anybody know a "good" dealer for a 460 Motor.... I have seen the
> > postings before, but never saved them, (silly person that I am) I am
> > looking for new $$$, or a good rebuild, hopefully w/ an RV Cam.
> >
> > Wsabers
> > 69 Mach I (for Sale)
> > 78 Bronco (in need of a transplant)
>
>
> Where are you located?

Vermillion South Dakota
It is not the middle of nowhere, but you can see it from here!


>
> Molater
>
> Daver
>
>
> ____________________________________________________________________
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Date: Tue, 24 Jun 1997 10:10:59 -0400
From: Kevin Kemmerer
To: "'fordtrucks lofcom.com'"
Subject: RE: '78 F150
Message-ID:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

fix it up up yes!
the motor is the 400 cid using the same big block bellhousing. it uses =
heads that are basically the 2bbl 351C heads and there was no ford =
performance version though the aftermarket is finally starting to catch =
on to this very buildable motor (351C 4bbl heads, single plane, etc.)....


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