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Date: Mon, 23 Mar 1998 04:51:52 -0700 (MST)
From: owner-fordtrucks97up-digest ListService.net (fordtrucks97up-digest)
To: fordtrucks97up-digest ListService.net
Subject: fordtrucks97up-digest V1 #33
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fordtrucks97up-digest Monday, March 23 1998 Volume 01 : Number 033



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Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1997 And Newer Trucks Digest
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=======================================================================
In this issue:

Admin [JDavis1277 ]
Re: What engine/axle combo for my application? [John941 ]
Re: Ford V-10 vs. Dodge V-10 [John941 ]
rear seats in 99 crew cabs [Rich Cower ]
Re: What engine/axle combo for my application? ["."
Re: Admin [BigFords1 ]
Re: What engine/axle combo for my application? [BigFords1
Re: What engine/axle combo for my application? [bklm juno.com]
Hummer !? [BigFords1 ]
Re: What engine/axle combo for my application? [BigFords1
Re: Hummer !? [BigFords1 ]
Re: What engine/axle combo for my application? ["."
Re: Hummer !? ["." ]
Re: Hummer !? [BigFords1 ]

=======================================================================

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Date: Sun, 22 Mar 1998 09:47:16 EST
From: JDavis1277
Subject: Admin

Ken,
Thank you, thank you! No more loooong headers and footers repeated over and
over and over. Hate that stuff.
Butch Davis-

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 22 Mar 1998 10:40:57 EST
From: John941
Subject: Re: What engine/axle combo for my application?

I believe that your 60 degree hill is a little over stated. There is no tow
vehicle(including an Abrahms main battle tank that can toe on that grade. I
would say 6 degress is a little more like it.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 22 Mar 1998 10:42:09 EST
From: John941
Subject: Re: Ford V-10 vs. Dodge V-10

I have a44

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 22 Mar 1998 09:02:34 -0800
From: Rich Cower
Subject: rear seats in 99 crew cabs

We have a 99 F350 Crew Cab, DRW, 4WD Lariat package on order. It's a great truck. My problem is the lack of
head restraints on the rear seat - Our 97 Crew Cab F350 has restraints on the rear seat - I put kids back there and don't
want their heads hitting the rear window on a rear end collision. We traded in our previous 89 F350 Crew Cab when
the kids got big enough to have their heads stick up above the seat back. My other vehicle is a Volvo - saftey is
pretty important.

I'd like to get this truck, it's got almost everything I want in a vehicle - but I need some form of fixed (sturdy) restraint
on that rear seat. Does anyone know of a place that will rebuild the seat in the 99 with a good head restraint? Any
guesstimate on what this will cost?

I've heard of an LE package in the fall, I asked the dealer about it today and they didn't know anything. Is it
4 bucket seats (2 front/2 rear)? and do you lose the center seating the rear? We put a car seat there with the smallest
one and need that space.

thanks...rich

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 22 Mar 1998 10:00:44 -0800
From: "."
Subject: Re: What engine/axle combo for my application?

The hills are as stated. When you have to go into the mountains you will find
WORSE hills than what I quoted.

I actually mean 60 deg from the horizontal, believe it or not?

John941 wrote:

> I believe that your 60 degree hill is a little over stated. There is no tow
> vehicle(including an Abrahms main battle tank that can toe on that grade. I
> would say 6 degress is a little more like it.
> +-------------- Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1997 and Newer --------------+
> | Send posts to fordtrucks97up listservice.net, |
> | List removal instructions on the website. |
> +----------------- Site: http://www.ford-trucks.com -----------------+

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 22 Mar 1998 16:28:25 EST
From: BigFords1
Subject: Re: Admin

Yea for BUTCH!!!!!!!!

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 22 Mar 1998 16:29:37 EST
From: BigFords1
Subject: Re: What engine/axle combo for my application?

My thoughts exactly when i read that i thought I was going Crazy! But now I
can sleep well tonight.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 22 Mar 1998 14:08:53 +0000
From: bklm juno.com
Subject: Re: What engine/axle combo for my application?

The hills are as stated. When you have to go into the mountains you will
find WORSE hills than what I quoted.
I actually mean 60 degree from the horizontal, believe it or not?

I believe that your 60 degree hill is a little over stated. There is no
tow vehicle(including an Abrahms main battle tank that can toe on that
grade. I would say 6 degrees is a little more like it.

- ----------------------------------------------------------

Just so we can have a productive argument lets define our terms. A six
degree grade is not the same as a six percent grade. Neither is a sixty
degree hill the same as a hill with a sixty percent grade.

AM General's Hummer is rated to climb a sixty percent grade. This
translates to a 31.963757 degree slope. If a truck were able to climb a
sixty degree slope it would translate to a 173.20508 percent grade. In
other words the truck would rise 173 feet for every hundred feet of run.

A forty-five degree slope is a one hundred percent grade. It rises one
hundred feet for every hundred feet of run.

I don't have a calculator within reach. (Check my previous numbers.) If
we assume a coefficient of friction of .8 between our tires and a smooth
asphalt or cement surface, what would be the maximum theoretical incline
a truck could climb. Remember any off road surface of dirt or gravel
would reduce that coefficient of friction substantially.

To figure the coefficient of friction of your own truck lock the brakes
on all four wheels and use a winch and a inline load gauge to measure the
force required to drag your truck. The force required to break traction
initially is the static friction while the force required to keep the
truck dragging along is the kinetic friction. To figure the coefficient
of friction, both static and kinetic, divide the required pulling force
by the curb weight of your truck. (Two wheel drive owners still have the
friction of all four wheels to hold them on an incline but only two
wheels to power them up that incline.)

_____________________________________________________________________
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Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 22 Mar 1998 17:38:31 EST
From: BigFords1
Subject: Hummer !?

What is so neat about hummers besides the 4 wheel independent suspension?!
They better than anything else at climbing! All you need to climb is good
tires, light weight, and strong engine! None of which the Hummer has! They
are heavy, stupid tires, and a weak GM diesel! Lockers also help in climbing.

David

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 22 Mar 1998 17:40:22 EST
From: BigFords1
Subject: Re: What engine/axle combo for my application?

I think this guy has too much time on his hands.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 22 Mar 1998 17:51:44 EST
From: BigFords1
Subject: Re: Hummer !?

I meant to say they aren't better than anythimg else at climbing!

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 22 Mar 1998 15:05:53 -0800
From: "."
Subject: Re: What engine/axle combo for my application?

YEP! I don't disagree with what is posted hereir. A 45 deg line bisecting a
right angle produces an X axis traverse equal to the Y axis traverse.
Therein lies the one to one correlation. The Coefficient of friction needs
to be understood with the weight, size tire, etc. Also, anyone that would
believe that a 350 cu in engine in a 3/4 ton truck would pull a LONG 60 deg
hill has gotta be missing something. I can say that with the load I had, two
miles an hour was alot of speed. My post merly provided a WORST case
indicator so that some kind of GUESSTAMATE could be made relative to the
posed question.

The same hill/s with a one ton Ford Diesel, didn't get two miles an hour
indicatio, towing a flat bed trailer with a jeep on it.. However, the diesel
had a better chance of not overheating. This FORD diesel had HALF the load
of the 3/4 with camper and 24ft boat attached. My EMPIRICAL post attempted
to provide a quick look at what was possible with the stated truck
parameters.

The diesel and the truck rear end ratios are unknown but I presume them to be
at least 4-1





bklm juno.com wrote:

> The hills are as stated. When you have to go into the mountains you will
> find WORSE hills than what I quoted.
> I actually mean 60 degree from the horizontal, believe it or not?
>
> I believe that your 60 degree hill is a little over stated. There is no
> tow vehicle(including an Abrahms main battle tank that can toe on that
> grade. I would say 6 degrees is a little more like it.
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------
>
> Just so we can have a productive argument lets define our terms. A six
> degree grade is not the same as a six percent grade. Neither is a sixty
> degree hill the same as a hill with a sixty percent grade.
>
> AM General's Hummer is rated to climb a sixty percent grade. This
> translates to a 31.963757 degree slope. If a truck were able to climb a
> sixty degree slope it would translate to a 173.20508 percent grade. In
> other words the truck would rise 173 feet for every hundred feet of run.
>
> A forty-five degree slope is a one hundred percent grade. It rises one
> hundred feet for every hundred feet of run.
>
> I don't have a calculator within reach. (Check my previous numbers.) If
> we assume a coefficient of friction of .8 between our tires and a smooth
> asphalt or cement surface, what would be the maximum theoretical incline
> a truck could climb. Remember any off road surface of dirt or gravel
> would reduce that coefficient of friction substantially.
>
> To figure the coefficient of friction of your own truck lock the brakes
> on all four wheels and use a winch and a inline load gauge to measure the
> force required to drag your truck. The force required to break traction
> initially is the static friction while the force required to keep the
> truck dragging along is the kinetic friction. To figure the coefficient
> of friction, both static and kinetic, divide the required pulling force
> by the curb weight of your truck. (Two wheel drive owners still have the
> friction of all four wheels to hold them on an incline but only two
> wheels to power them up that incline.)
>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail.
> Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.juno.com
> Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]
>
> +-------------- Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1997 and Newer --------------+
> | Send posts to fordtrucks97up listservice.net, |
> | List removal instructions on the website. |
> +----------------- Site: http://www.ford-trucks.com -----------------+

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 22 Mar 1998 15:12:00 -0800
From: "."
Subject: Re: Hummer !?

Iceland has hill climbing events that have vehicles with 800 horse, and LAUGHING
GAS boosters to climb 80 degree hills. When you see that event, one would quickly
realize that 60 degree is a tough one too.

HUMMERS ! are a hell of a vehicle AFTER you see the test runs that they need to
pass before being shipped. there's more to the HUMMER than just guess work.
Beleive me!


BigFords1 wrote:

> What is so neat about hummers besides the 4 wheel independent suspension?!
> They better than anything else at climbing! All you need to climb is good
> tires, light weight, and strong engine! None of which the Hummer has! They
> are heavy, stupid tires, and a weak GM diesel! Lockers also help in climbing.
>
> David
> +-------------- Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1997 and Newer --------------+
> | Send posts to fordtrucks97up listservice.net, |
> | List removal instructions on the website. |....


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