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Received: with LISTAR (v0.128a; list 97up-list); Thu, 10 Feb 2000 19:13:03 -0500 (EST)
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 19:13:03 -0500 (EST)
From: Ford Truck Enthusiasts List Server ford-trucks.com>
To: 97up-list digest users ford-trucks.com>
Reply-to: 97up-list ford-trucks.com
Subject: 97up-list Digest V2000 #2
Precedence: bulk

==========================================================
Ford Truck Enthusiasts 1997 and Newer Truck Mailing
List(Use the Small Chassis List for Rangers, Explorers,
Aerostars and Bronco IIs.

Visit our web site: http://www.ford-trucks.com

To unsubscribe, send email to: listar ford-trucks.com with
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==========================================================

------------------------------------
97up-list Digest Wed, 09 Feb 2000 Volume: 2000 Issue: 002

In This Issue:
Re: Oil Weight???, Was: My first Oil Change
Re: 97up-list Digest V2000 #1
Re: Oil Change
ADMIN: Use a subject in replies
Mobil 1
Oil
Re. Receiver hitch.
Re: Bumper Suggestions?
Re: 97up-list Digest V2000 #1
Re: Oil Change
Re: Bumper Suggestions?
Computer code
Re: Computer code
Re: No cool vent air
Oil Changes
Re: Oil Change
Re: Oil Change
Re: Computer code
Re: Re. Receiver hitch.
Re: Oil Change
4R100 drain plug
Re: Oil Change
Re: Oil Change...long post
Re: Oil Change
Re: 4R100 drain plug
Re: 4R100 drain plug
Re: 4R100 drain plug
Kick plates
Re: 4R100 drain plug
Re: 4R100 drain plug

----------------------------------------------------------------------

From: "Keith Veren" worldnet.att.net>
Subject: Re: Oil Weight???, Was: My first Oil Change
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2000 19:43:38 -0500

Correct. Think in terms of WD-40. If WD-40 was thick like oil or grease,
do you think it would penetrate tight bolts and squeaky bearing seals? No.
Same thing with oil, only oil needs more "body to prevent metal-to-metal
contact, but, if it is too thick, it just will not be able to penetrate to
the places it is needed.

Keith


----- Original Message -----
From: "George Rigney" WSNelson.com>
To: <97up-list ford-trucks.com>
Sent: Wednesday, February 09, 2000 12:33 PM
Subject: [97up-list] Re: Oil Weight???, Was: My first Oil Change


> If you look at a viscosity chart, you will see that 10W-30 has a very
> similar profile to 5W-30. It is slightly more viscous, even at high
> temperatures. When I brought my SD in for an oil change, they used 10W-30
> in place of 5W-30, and when I pointed this out they said that was fine and
> that Ford approved of the substitution because of our hot climate. I
didn't
> investigate this any further, but I didn't buy it. I now do my own oil
> changes and I always use 5W-30. I don't know about sludge buildup, but a
> more viscous oil may not penetrate into tight clearances as well and it
may
> change the size of the hydrodynamic wedge that your crankshaft rides on,
> which will affect lubrication flow between the journal and bearing.
>
> In conclusion, the differences are slight. There may be no measurable
> effect in using 10W-30 instead of 5W-30. Since they're the same price,
why
> not use the 5W-30 since your manual recommends it?
>
> Regards,
> George
>
> 1974 Gran Torino Elite 351W
> 1984 LTD Crown Victoria 302
> 1999 F250 SD CC V10
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Christian Bagley [mailto:c_bagley hotmail.com]
> Sent: Wednesday, February 09, 2000 11:04 AM
> To: 97up-list ford-trucks.com
> Subject: [97up-list] Oil Weight???, Was: My first Oil Change
>
>
> What weight oil is safe for these engines? The service people at my local
> dealer said that 10W30 would run the risk of producing sludge in the
engine
> and they said absolutely stay with 5w30. Are these people crazy or what?
>
>
> Chris in VA
>
>
>
> ______________________________________________________
> >
> ==========================================================
> To unsubscribe, send email to: listar ford-trucks.com with
> the words "unsubscribe 97up-list" in the body of the
> message.
>
>
> ==========================================================
> To unsubscribe, send email to: listar ford-trucks.com with
> the words "unsubscribe 97up-list" in the body of the
> message.
>
>


------------------------------

From: ShermanPowell aol.com
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2000 20:38:05 EST
Subject: Re: 97up-list Digest V2000 #1

In a message dated 2/9/00 7:50:03 PM Eastern Standard Time,
listar ford-trucks.com writes:

<<
why dont you just get a winch that slides into receiver? I hear those work
great and a few companys have them. Or if you need the front bumper, check
out ranchand.com, thats what i am getting when i get one, there the best in
TX.

RS >>

The problem with the receiver-mount winches is that they are limited by the
strength of the receiver. Many (most?) Class III receivers are rated at
5,000 pounds, so if you mount a 12K winch on one, you might have a
significant emotional event when you try to un-stick your 6000-plus pound
beast, sunk up to the axles in mud, and the receiver fails. (You can
actually load a winch with up to 150% of your vehicle's weight when it's
stuck bad.) Don't get me wrong, I like the idea, and you won't run into
problems during "routine" use, but it could also fail when you need it most.

-Sherman Powell

------------------------------

From: MFAPHOTO aol.com
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2000 21:45:13 EST
Subject: Re: Oil Change

Of course it depends on how much you work your truck, but about a year
ago, Consumer Reports did a test of motor oils and change intervals. They
used a fleet of Taxicabs in New York for the test. They put various oils in
them and then tore the engines down at different intervals to check for wear.
In the end, because of the improvement of oils in recent years, they
suggested oil changes at 7,000 mile intervals. They claimed that wear in
engines that had oil changes at 7,000 mile intervals were no more worn than
engines that had them at more frequently. They said that there is no
scientific basis for recommending changes at 3,000 mile intervals with
today's complex formulations and they are a waste of money and only make the
oil companies and oil changing shops richer. So, I'm definitely not getting
3,000 mile changes and if I'm pulling a lot of weight, I will change at 5,000
miles to be safe.

Russ Martin
2000 F150 Lariat 4X4 5.4L, Chestnut Brown

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 09 Feb 2000 22:25:29 -0500
From: Ken Payne ford-trucks.com>
Subject: ADMIN: Use a subject in replies

Okay gang, I don't think its asking too much to put
a subject in the replies. Message threads are
difficult too follow if the subject is:

[97up-list] Re: 97up-list Digest V2000 #1

Unfortunately, I don't have a filter to bounce these
yet, but I will soon.

Ken Payne
Admin, Ford Truck Enthusiasts




------------------------------

From: JPatte5238 aol.com
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2000 22:31:43 EST
Subject: Mobil 1

I hope I can help with the Mobil 1 questions. I work for ExxonMobil corp.,
but I don't know how, why, or make the Mobil 1 product. I do know that Mobil
has a web site that can answer most of your questions.
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.mobil.com/mobil1_racing/about/where/factoryfill/index.html
The web site says that new cars from the factory come with Mobil 1 already,
cars like Aston Martin, Callway, Corvette, Viper, Mercedes Benz and Porsche.

John Patterson
What kind of work I do? I turn H2S into sulfur.

------------------------------

From: "James L. Sutton" worldnet.att.net>
Subject: Oil
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2000 21:35:11 -0600

The book says 6 qt., that's what it takes.

I have a '97 F-150 with the 4.6l V8. The first time I got the oil changed, it
drove the mechanic nuts. He kept checking the dip stick, which does not appear
to reflect the same amount on both sides of the stick. Since that time, he puts
in 6 qt. regardless of the stick indication.

I have found the best time, the only time, to check the oil level, is when the
engine is cold and the oil has had sufficient time to settle. Any other time,
including with a fresh oil change, the indication is low.

James L. Sutton
e-mail: jim_sutton worldnet.att.net



------------------------------

From: CERESJohnG aol.com
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2000 22:52:38 EST
Subject: Re. Receiver hitch.

a 12K winch would be a bit much for a receiver winch mount. I think Warn
limits theirs to 9000 lbs and sells the total package with the 8000# winch.

Ramsey on the other hand I think limits theirs to 6000#.

I generally stay a bit cautious with mine, If it looks like a serious load, I
use the snatchblock and come back to one of the tow hooks. That cuts the load
on the winch mount by half for any pull, Still doesn't help tho if the winch
is over capacity and you use it all.

JG

------------------------------

From: davesomers worldnet.att.net>
Subject: Re: Bumper Suggestions?
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2000 22:54:38 -0500

>davesomers worldnet.att.net writes:
> I am looking for suggestions for winch bumpers for both ends of my 99
F350 DRW.
>
> What have other people seen?
> Dave Somers
>
>RSnovi aol.com writes:
>why dont you just get a winch that slides into receiver? I hear those
work
>great and a few companys have them. Or if you need the front bumper,
check
>out ranchand.com, thats what i am getting when i get one, there the best
in
>TX.
>RS

The receiver mount winches are always suggested to me, but I've ruled them
out for two reasons:
1) That winch is pretty damn heavy to be moving back and forth.
2) With the winch in the receiver, I can't hook up the trailer too. (I
certainly wouldn't cantilever 1000lbs tongue weight out another 24" to put
it beyond the winch) The rear winch is used for pulling cargo into the
trailer as much as "unsticking"

I checked out
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.ranchhand.com
and liked the looks of the "front end replacement". Priced very reasonable
too. (But didn't see rear winch option)
I've never seen one in NJ (even the western part of the state). How do
they look close up?
Dave Somers



------------------------------

From: RSnovi aol.com
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2000 23:45:41 EST
Subject: Re: 97up-list Digest V2000 #1

In a message dated 2/9/00 8:39:21 PM Eastern Standard Time,
ShermanPowell aol.com writes:

but are most recievers on F250 and up rated at 10K, and i am sure the type of
front bumper i am speaking of can handle it. Its not like the abuse it will
take from a good yank from a strap. A solid pull will not break compared to
some of the theories i have tested, lol!

RS
<<

The problem with the receiver-mount winches is that they are limited by the
strength of the receiver. Many (most?) Class III receivers are rated at
5,000 pounds, so if you mount a 12K winch on one, you might have a
significant emotional event when you try to un-stick your 6000-plus pound
beast, sunk up to the axles in mud, and the receiver fails. (You can
actually load a winch with up to 150% of your vehicle's weight when it's
stuck bad.) Don't get me wrong, I like the idea, and you won't run into
problems during "routine" use, but it could also fail when you need it most.

-Sherman Powell >>

------------------------------

From: "Keith Veren" worldnet.att.net>
Subject: Re: Oil Change
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2000 23:48:22 -0500

Consumer reports is also a leftist, SUV and Pickup-hating magazine that
thinks we should have a health system like in Canada where thing are get
worse by the minute. They love little 50 MPG eggshells and they will never
just come out and state that your family is much safer in an Expedition,
Excursion, Suburban etc. than an Altima or Corolla. Too bad they have such
a philosophical bent, otherwise, they might be a good rag, but back to the
oil test. They used cabs that run all day, so they do not have a lot of
water buildup in the oil from those real short trips to the grocery store
your wife takes. The test has been faulted by many in the oil industry and
even they admit it may not apply to many people with different driving
habits.

Keith


----- Original Message -----
From: aol.com>
To: <97up-list ford-trucks.com>
Sent: Wednesday, February 09, 2000 9:45 PM
Subject: [97up-list] Re: Oil Change


> Of course it depends on how much you work your truck, but about a year
> ago, Consumer Reports did a test of motor oils and change intervals. They
> used a fleet of Taxicabs in New York for the test. They put various oils
in
> them and then tore the engines down at different intervals to check for
wear.
> In the end, because of the improvement of oils in recent years, they
> suggested oil changes at 7,000 mile intervals. They claimed that wear in
> engines that had oil changes at 7,000 mile intervals were no more worn
than
> engines that had them at more frequently. They said that there is no
> scientific basis for recommending changes at 3,000 mile intervals with
> today's complex formulations and they are a waste of money and only make
the
> oil companies and oil changing shops richer. So, I'm definitely not
getting
> 3,000 mile changes and if I'm pulling a lot of weight, I will change at
5,000
> miles to be safe.
>
> Russ Martin
> 2000 F150 Lariat 4X4 5.4L, Chestnut Brown
> ==========================================================
> To unsubscribe, send email to: listar ford-trucks.com with
> the words "unsubscribe 97up-list" in the body of the
> message.
>
>


------------------------------

From: RSnovi aol.com
Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2000 23:58:03 EST
Subject: Re: Bumper Suggestions?

In a message dated 2/9/00 11:08:56 PM Eastern Standard Time,
davesomers worldnet.att.net writes:

<<
The receiver mount winches are always suggested to me, but I've ruled them
out for two reasons:
1) That winch is pretty damn heavy to be moving back and forth.
2) With the winch in the receiver, I can't hook up the trailer too. (I
certainly wouldn't cantilever 1000lbs tongue weight out another 24" to put
it beyond the winch) The rear winch is used for pulling cargo into the
trailer as much as "unsticking"

--How much do you need for trailer to pull on? Some of the smaller ones
should do the trick.
-- Unless you need front and rear access for truck, then your SOL.
-- The bumpers are a nice piece i know of two friends in south TX that have
them , they love them, I have seen them their tough. Great for those
unexpected animals or whatever. Their are a few other companies that make
them i have researched since i probably will be buying one sometime, they
just dont seem to measure up. You probably wont see them anywhere up that
was as most people really dont know about them.


RS

I checked out
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.ranchhand.com
and liked the looks of the "front end replacement". Priced very reasonable
too. (But didn't see rear winch option)
I've never seen one in NJ (even the western part of the state). How do
they look close up?
Dave Somers
>>

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 07:09:44 -0500
From: Dean Baruffi yale.edu>
Subject: Computer code

I sent superchips my computer programming code on the only sticker on the
driver's door of my 2000 F-150. The code is: 0 F5 1 4D O B. My helms CD
says it breaks down as follows:

The 8 digit code breakdown is as follows:
0 - Model year (model year in which calibration strategy was first introduced)
F5 - Vehicle code
1 - Transmission code
4D - Unique calibration (designates different hardware to similar
vehicles). Example: tires, drive ratios, etc.
O - Fleet code (describes fleet to which the vehicle belongs). Example: 6 -
evaporative emissions
B - Certification region (lead region where multiple regions are included
in one calibration). Example: A - U.S. federal

Ford now uses Protocol 3 to display this information.

Superchips is looking for a code of: XYZ # (3 letters and a number). I
cannot find this anywhere. Is it possible Ford does not use this code
scheme anymore?

My vehicle is a 2000 F-150 SC 4x2 5.4L

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

-Dean



------------------------------

From: "Zinski, Steve" richmond.edu>
Subject: Re: Computer code
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 08:32:55 -0500

The computer code can be found in two places.

The first place is in the door jamb of the passenger's front door. Open the
door and look between the hinges and you should see a little white sticker
with a 4-digit code printed on it.

The second place to look is on the wiring harness which plugs into the
computer module itself. Look between your battery and the firewall and
you'll see this rather large wiring harness poking out. There should be a
little white sticker on it as well.

And, if I'm not mistaken, I also believe there is a sticker on the computer
module itself (mounted to the passenger-side kick panel up under the dash).

--Steve Zinski


-----Original Message-----
From: Dean Baruffi [mailto:dean.baruffi yale.edu]
Sent: Thursday, February 10, 2000 7:10 AM
To: 97up-list ford-trucks.com
Subject: [97up-list] Computer code


I sent superchips my computer programming code on the only sticker on the
driver's door of my 2000 F-150. The code is: 0 F5 1 4D O B. My helms CD
says it breaks down as follows:

The 8 digit code breakdown is as follows:
0 - Model year (model year in which calibration strategy was first
introduced)
F5 - Vehicle code
1 - Transmission code
4D - Unique calibration (designates different hardware to similar
vehicles). Example: tires, drive ratios, etc.
O - Fleet code (describes fleet to which the vehicle belongs). Example: 6 -
evaporative emissions
B - Certification region (lead region where multiple regions are included
in one calibration). Example: A - U.S. federal

Ford now uses Protocol 3 to display this information.

Superchips is looking for a code of: XYZ # (3 letters and a number). I
cannot find this anywhere. Is it possible Ford does not use this code
scheme anymore?

My vehicle is a 2000 F-150 SC 4x2 5.4L

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

-Dean

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 09:06:11 -0800
From: Jean Marc Chartier sympatico.ca>
Subject: Re: No cool vent air

"Zinski, Steve" wrote:
>
> My Honda Accord had the same problem. Turned out that the linkage to the
> heater core shutoff valve was not aligned correctly. This allowed hot
> coolant to flow through the core. A simple adjustment fixed the problem.
>
> --Steve
>

Steve,

Ford products for some time now do not use a valve to
divert coolant around the core. Hot coolant always flows
through the heater core. The problem with the Explorer is
that the air intake duct allows hot engine air to heat it so
it pulls hot outside air into the cabin. I should have
mentioned this on my previous post.

Regards

Jean Marc Chartier

------------------------------

Date: 10 Feb 00 09:09:57 EST
From: Andthensometoo usa.net>
Subject: Oil Changes

I am to lazy to retype stuff so if you want my Oil change story just check it
out here:
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.fortunecity.com/silverstone/daytona/843/penske.html
I will add follow up on this page soon

____________________________________________________________________
Get free email and a permanent address at http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.netaddress.com/?N=1

------------------------------

From: jmann living.com
Subject: Re: Oil Change
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 08:56:13 -0600

With that said, I thing you have to ask, between the two, who stands the
most to gain by shorter change intervals?

Also, I love my truck and grew up driving them and learned to drive in them.
But if we all had SUV class/size vehicles then there would be much of an
advantage, now would there?

-----Original Message-----
From: Keith Veren [mailto:Spectrum-EHS worldnet.att.net]
Sent: Wednesday, February 09, 2000 10:48 PM
To: 97up-list ford-trucks.com
Subject: [97up-list] Re: Oil Change

Consumer reports is also a leftist, SUV and Pickup-hating magazine that
thinks we should have a health system like in Canada where thing are get
worse by the minute. They love little 50 MPG eggshells and they will never
just come out and state that your family is much safer in an Expedition,
Excursion, Suburban etc. than an Altima or Corolla. Too bad they have such
a philosophical bent, otherwise, they might be a good rag, but back to the
oil test. They used cabs that run all day, so they do not have a lot of
water buildup in the oil from those real short trips to the grocery store
your wife takes. The test has been faulted by many in the oil industry and
even they admit it may not apply to many people with different driving
habits.

Keith


------------------------------

From: "Union Auto" adiis.net>
Subject: Re: Oil Change
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 08:55:42 -0600

I'd advise against going that long on an oil changer (or start saving for
repair bills). A taxi starts in the morning and shuts off at night so its
oil change interval would be much different than the normal driver. I
change my oil every 2000 miles (and use synthetic).

Nathan Bernard

----- Original Message -----
From: aol.com>
To: <97up-list ford-trucks.com>
Sent: Wednesday, February 09, 2000 8:45 PM
Subject: [97up-list] Re: Oil Change


> Of course it depends on how much you work your truck, but about a year
> ago, Consumer Reports did a test of motor oils and change intervals. They
> used a fleet of Taxicabs in New York for the test. They put various oils
in
> them and then tore the engines down at different intervals to check for
wear.
> In the end, because of the improvement of oils in recent years, they
> suggested oil changes at 7,000 mile intervals. They claimed that wear in
> engines that had oil changes at 7,000 mile intervals were no more worn
than
> engines that had them at more frequently. They said that there is no
> scientific basis for recommending changes at 3,000 mile intervals with
> today's complex formulations and they are a waste of money and only make
the
> oil companies and oil changing shops richer. So, I'm definitely not
getting
> 3,000 mile changes and if I'm pulling a lot of weight, I will change at
5,000
> miles to be safe.
>
> Russ Martin
> 2000 F150 Lariat 4X4 5.4L, Chestnut Brown
> ==========================================================
> To unsubscribe, send email to: listar ford-trucks.com with
> the words "unsubscribe 97up-list" in the body of the
> message.
>


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 11:39:58 -0800
From: Jean Marc Chartier sympatico.ca>
Subject: Re: Computer code

Dean Baruffi wrote:
>
> I sent superchips my computer programming code on the only sticker on the
> driver's door of my 2000 F-150. The code is: 0 F5 1 4D O B. My helms CD
> says it breaks down as follows:
>
> The 8 digit code breakdown is as follows:
> 0 - Model year (model year in which calibration strategy was first introduced)
> F5 - Vehicle code
> 1 - Transmission code
> 4D - Unique calibration (designates different hardware to similar
> vehicles). Example: tires, drive ratios, etc.
> O - Fleet code (describes fleet to which the vehicle belongs). Example: 6 -
> evaporative emissions
> B - Certification region (lead region where multiple regions are included
> in one calibration). Example: A - U.S. federal
>
> Ford now uses Protocol 3 to display this information.
>
> Superchips is looking for a code of: XYZ # (3 letters and a number). I
> cannot find this anywhere. Is it possible Ford does not use this code
> scheme anymore?
>
> My vehicle is a 2000 F-150 SC 4x2 5.4L
>
> Any help will be greatly appreciated.
>
> -Dean
>
> ==========================================================
> To unsubscribe, send email to: listar ford-trucks.com with
> the words "unsubscribe 97up-list" in the body of the
> message.

Dean,

Look between the hinges of the passenger door. Failing
this look on the PCM.

Regards

Jean Marc Chartier

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 10:20:08 -0800
From: johny netapp.com>
Subject: Re: Re. Receiver hitch.

I've heard the limitation is due to the shear strength of the pin.
I've heard it's rated at 10,000 lbs.

Heard this from my local 4x4 store, but never tried to verify the data.

Anyone heard different?

CERESJohnG aol.com wrote:

> a 12K winch would be a bit much for a receiver winch mount. I think Warn
> limits theirs to 9000 lbs and sells the total package with the 8000# winch.
>
> Ramsey on the other hand I think limits theirs to 6000#.
>
> I generally stay a bit cautious with mine, If it looks like a serious load, I
> use the snatchblock and come back to one of the tow hooks. That cuts the load
> on the winch mount by half for any pull, Still doesn't help tho if the winch
> is over capacity and you use it all.
>
> JG
> ==========================================================
> To unsubscribe, send email to: listar ford-trucks.com with
> the words "unsubscribe 97up-list" in the body of the
> message.




------------------------------

From: "Jason Holmes" hotmail.com>
Subject: Re: Oil Change
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 11:00:50 PST

I mean no offense, but your logic seems faulted. If a taxi has constant use
(moreso than the normal driver) the change frequency would be sooner not
later. Conversely, if one does not put a heavy strain on the engine (or oil)
the time between changes would increase.



>From: "Union Auto" adiis.net>
>
>I'd advise against going that long on an oil changer (or start saving for
>repair bills). A taxi starts in the morning and shuts off at night so its
>oil change interval would be much different than the normal driver. I
>change my oil every 2000 miles (and use synthetic).
>
>Nathan Bernard
>

>

______________________________________________________


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 14:23:00 -0500
From: Dean Baruffi yale.edu>
Subject: 4R100 drain plug

I just took a look at the 4R100 transmisson section on my Helms CD as I
wanted to read the section on how to remove the transmission pan. It says
I should have a drain plug on my 4R100 transmission pan but I do not. It
also says there is a torque converted drain plug. I have not check this
yet. Has anyone checked to see if their torque converter has a drain plug
on it?

My vehicle is a 2000 F-150 SC, 4x2 SC, 5.4L with California emissions.

-Dean




------------------------------

From: "Keith Veren" worldnet.att.net>
Subject: Re: Oil Change
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 14:50:19 -0500

Wrong. It's just the opposite. The killer of oil is short runs where the
oil does not get hot enough to evaporate all the water and acid -gas
byproducts that form during the first 15 minutes after starting. After an
engine is running at the proper temperature, the blow-by is well reduced,
the water vapor input into the crankcase is just about eliminated, and the
contaminating acid-gases cannot condense on the cylinder walls and
contaminate the lubricating film. Kind of like certain electrical equipment
that lasts much longer if always left on because the wear is caused by
thermal cycles, not static warmth.

Keith




----- Original Message -----
From: "Jason Holmes" hotmail.com>
To: <97up-list ford-trucks.com>
Sent: Thursday, February 10, 2000 2:00 PM
Subject: [97up-list] Re: Oil Change


> I mean no offense, but your logic seems faulted. If a taxi has constant
use
> (moreso than the normal driver) the change frequency would be sooner not
> later. Conversely, if one does not put a heavy strain on the engine (or
oil)
> the time between changes would increase.
>
>
>
> >From: "Union Auto" adiis.net>
> >
> >I'd advise against going that long on an oil changer (or start saving for
> >repair bills). A taxi starts in the morning and shuts off at night so
its
> >oil change interval would be much different than the normal driver. I
> >change my oil every 2000 miles (and use synthetic).
> >
> >Nathan Bernard
> >
>
> >
>
> ______________________________________________________
> >
> ==========================================================
> To unsubscribe, send email to: listar ford-trucks.com with
> the words "unsubscribe 97up-list" in the body of the
> message.
>


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 14:12:49 -0600
Subject: Re: Oil Change...long post
From: Glenn S See juno.com>

<<<....... if one does not put a heavy strain on the engine (or oil)
the time between changes would increase....>>>

If stress and strain were the only factors affecting engine wear then the
above statement would be substantially correct. However, other factors,
primarily thermal cycling of the engine and ambient humidity
fluctuations, will affect the purity, and therefore the lubricating and
preservative qualities, of the oil.

Beyond the obvious expansion and contraction of parts due to temperature
changes (which can initiate metal fatigue by itself), each time the
engine cools down after use an amount of moisture laden air is drawn into
the engine. This moisture will produce contaminants by reacting with
bare metal surfaces, wear products on the metal surfaces, and wear
products in the oil. Eventually these contaminants will affect the
ability of the oil to lubricate and protect the engine components,
regardless of how "efficient" the filtering system is (better filtration
can lengthen the time to oil "breakdown" but not prevent the eventual
loss of oil quality and purity).

This moisture interaction occurs in all rotating machinery, even greased
bearings and "sealed" bearings and is considered to be leading cause of
"random" bearing failures in industry. There are no perfect seals.

The idea was mentioned in earlier posts....theoretically, if you could
run your engine continuously, with adequate filtration, the engine life
(and oil life) would be substantially longer than if you ran the engine
for short periods frequently.

Also, even if you did not run the engine, the daily/seasonal fluctuations
in ambient humidity are enough to cause moisture intrusion in machinery
and damage rotating component surfaces. Nature works in insidious ways.
This is a primary reason manufacturers include a time factor in their
schedules for oil changes.

This moisture intrusion phenomena is not my personal theory, but was
related to me by a retired Exxon employee who was their lead engineer on
rotating machinery with several decades experience in the field of
lubrication science.

Bottom line, you can't change the oil too often. It becomes an economic
decision how often. It should be noted that oil condition is only one
variable in engine wear. Personally, I change the oil in my '98 F-150
every 3000 miles (as recommended for "severe" service in the service
manual).

Submitted to offer some additional insight into lubrication theory.

Steve

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 12:02:01 -0800 (PST)
From: Hunter yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: Oil Change

WOW 2000 mile, if I did my math right and your truck take 6 qt. $5 each for synthetic.
That's close to $1000 for me. + gas + INS. + brake +...etc. I would've never drove a
car or truck. I thought our trucks should be 100,000 for tune-up and you need to
change it around 4000 mile with 5w-30.

Nathan,
Let me know when you want to sell your truck...:o)

Hunter

> >I'd advise against going that long on an oil changer (or start saving for
> >repair bills). A taxi starts in the morning and shuts off at night so its
> >oil change interval would be much different than the normal driver. I
> >change my oil every 2000 miles (and use synthetic).
> >
> >Nathan Bernard

__________________________________________________
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Talk to your friends online with Yahoo! Messenger.
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------------------------------

From: RSnoviaol.com
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 15:59:55 EST
Subject: Re: 4R100 drain plug

In a message dated 2/10/00 2:26:11 PM Eastern Standard Time,
dean.baruffiyale.edu writes:

mine is direct center of alum pan of 4R100 in 99 F250 PSD , 4x4. i was
unaware of other drain in the converter area. Will take a gander next time.


RS

<< Subj: [97up-list] 4R100 drain plug
Date: 2/10/00 2:26:11 PM Eastern Standard Time
From: dean.baruffiyale.edu (Dean Baruffi)
Sender: 97up-list-bounceford-trucks.com
Reply-to: 97up-listford-trucks.com
To: 97up-listford-trucks.com

I just took a look at the 4R100 transmisson section on my Helms CD as I
wanted to read the section on how to remove the transmission pan. It says
I should have a drain plug on my 4R100 transmission pan but I do not. It
also says there is a torque converted drain plug. I have not check this
yet. Has anyone checked to see if their torque converter has a drain plug
on it?

My vehicle is a 2000 F-150 SC, 4x2 SC, 5.4L with California emissions.

-Dean



==========================================================
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Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 14:23:00 -0500
To: 97up-listford-trucks.com
From: Dean Baruffi yale.edu>
Subject: [97up-list] 4R100 drain plug
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>>

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 15:33:55 -0700
From: "Joseph L. Casey" frii.com>
Subject: Re: 4R100 drain plug

I have a torque convertor drain plug on my 99 Powerstroke.



Dean Baruffi wrote:

> I just took a look at the 4R100 transmisson section on my Helms CD as I
> wanted to read the section on how to remove the transmission pan. It says
> I should have a drain plug on my 4R100 transmission pan but I do not. It
> also says there is a torque converted drain plug. I have not check this
> yet. Has anyone checked to see if their torque converter has a drain plug
> on it?
>
> My vehicle is a 2000 F-150 SC, 4x2 SC, 5.4L with California emissions.
>
> -Dean
>
> ==========================================================
> To unsubscribe, send email to: listarford-trucks.com with
> the words "unsubscribe 97up-list" in the body of the
> message.


------------------------------

Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 13:28:43 -0800
From: johny netapp.com>
Subject: Re: 4R100 drain plug

I can't tell you about the F150, but on a 99 SD, there is a plug on the pan,
and a plug on the torque converter. Recently refilled with Mobil 1 ATF,
and notice almost a 5F - 7F temperature drop on the transmission on
highway cruising.

I'm impressed. (I've heard some of the Amsoil guys claiming up to 10F, and
with some margin of error on the measuring devices, I believe it)


Dean Baruffi wrote:

> I just took a look at the 4R100 transmisson section on my Helms CD as I
> wanted to read the section on how to remove the transmission pan. It says
> I should have a drain plug on my 4R100 transmission pan but I do not. It
> also says there is a torque converted drain plug. I have not check this
> yet. Has anyone checked to see if their torque converter has a drain plug
> on it?
>
> My vehicle is a 2000 F-150 SC, 4x2 SC, 5.4L with California emissions.
>
> -Dean
>
> ==========================================================
> To unsubscribe, send email to: listarford-trucks.com with
> the words "unsubscribe 97up-list" in the body of the
> message.




------------------------------

From: jmannliving.com
Subject: Kick plates
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 17:21:30 -0600

Ok, I'm not exactly sure if they call them kick plates, but you know that
strip of plastic trim on the floor of the truck, at the edge of the door
opening, that is hidden when the door is closed?? I hope that's a good
enough explanation. Anyway, does anyone know where I might find some nice
chrome steel or polished aluminum ones. Since this is one of the first
places I step when getting in the truck, they tend to show where faster.
Metal would look nicer and last longer.

Thanks

Joe
Austin, TX.

Let your friends know that they can register to win one of 10 $1000 gift
certificates at living.com. They just need to click here
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://promotions.yahoo.com/promotions/living3/ to register. Pass it on!
Sorry, had to put a plug in for the old company.

------------------------------

From: jmannliving.com
Subject: Re: 4R100 drain plug
Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 17:31:55 -0600

Do the 4R100 and the 4R70W take the same type of transmission fluid? And
does Mobil 1 make an oil for differentials.

-----Original Message-----
From: johny [mailto:johnynetapp.com]
Sent: Thursday, February 10, 2000 3:29 PM
To: 97up-listford-trucks.com
Subject: [97up-list] Re: 4R100 drain plug

I can't tell you about the F150, but on a 99 SD, there is a plug on the pan,
and a plug on the torque converter. Recently refilled with Mobil 1 ATF,
and notice almost a 5F - 7F temperature drop on the transmission on
highway cruising.

I'm impressed. (I've heard some of the Amsoil guys claiming up to 10F, and
with some margin of error on the measuring devices, I believe it)


Dean Baruffi wrote:

> I just took a look at the 4R100 transmisson section on my Helms CD as I
> wanted to read the section on how to remove the transmission pan. It says
> I should have a drain plug on my 4R100 transmission pan but I do not. It
> also says there is a torque converted drain plug. I have not check this
> yet. Has anyone checked to see if their torque converter has a drain plug
> on it?
>
> My vehicle is a 2000 F-150 SC, 4x2 SC, 5.4L with California emissions.
>
> -Dean
>
> ==========================================================
> To unsubscribe, send email to: listarford-trucks.com with
> the words "unsubscribe 97up-list" in the body of the
> message.



==========================================================
To unsubscribe, send email to: listarford-trucks.com with
the words "unsubscribe 97up-list" in the body of the
message.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 16:15:25 -0800
Subject: Re: 4R100 drain plug
From: Rob Bryan netgate.net>

No...the 4R100 takes Mercon (aka Dextron II), the 4R70W uses Mercon V which
is much harder to find (especially in a synthetic that doesn't cost $8/qt
like the Redline stuff).

FWIW, the 4R100 on my dad's '99 5.4L Expedition has a drain plug on the pan.

Rob

> From: jmannliving.com
> Reply-To: 97up-listford-trucks.com
> Date: Thu, 10 Feb 2000 17:31:55 -0600
> To: 97up-listford-trucks.com
> Subject: [97up-list] Re: 4R100 drain plug
>
> Do the 4R100 and the 4R70W take the same type of transmission fluid? And
> does Mobil 1 make an oil for differentials.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: johny [mailto:johnynetapp.com]
> Sent: Thursday, February 10, 2000 3:29 PM
> To: 97up-listford-trucks.com
> Subject: [97up-list] Re: 4R100 drain plug
>
> I can't tell you about the F150, but on a 99 SD, there is a plug on the pan,
> and a plug on the torque converter. Recently refilled with Mobil 1 ATF,
> and notice almost a 5F - 7F temperature drop on the transmission on
> highway cruising.
>
> I'm impressed. (I've heard some of the Amsoil guys claiming up to 10F, and
> with some margin of error on the measuring devices, I believe it)
>
>
> Dean Baruffi wrote:
>
>> I just took a look at the 4R100 transmisson section on my Helms CD as I
>> wanted to read the section on how to remove the transmission pan. It says
>> I should have a drain plug on my 4R100 transmission pan but I do not. It
>> also says there is a torque converted drain plug. I have not check this
>> yet. Has anyone checked to see if their torque converter has a drain plug
>> on it?
>>
>> My vehicle is a 2000 F-150 SC, 4x2 SC, 5.4L with California emissions.
>>
>> -Dean


------------------------------

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