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Date: Fri, 9 Jan 1998 03:50:22 -0700 (MST)
From: owner-fordtrucks80up-digest ListService.net (fordtrucks80up-digest)
To: fordtrucks80up-digest ListService.net
Subject: fordtrucks80up-digest V2 #15
Reply-To: fordtrucks80up ListService.net
Sender: owner-fordtrucks80up-digest ListService.net


fordtrucks80up-digest Friday, January 9 1998 Volume 02 : Number 015



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Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1980 And Newer Trucks Digest
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In this issue:

Re: Carburator Problems??? ["David J. Baldwin" ]
Re: fordtrucks80up-digest V2 #14 [Bill Funk ]
Re: Ranger problems ["Lare/Eric" ]
Re: fordtrucks80up-digest V2 #14 [Jim Orson ]
Re: Bug Deflectors [Randy ]
Re: Carburator Problems? [Bill Funk ]
Re: Parking Position (Transmissions) [ILuvTruks ]
Re: Parking [hunter cyberstreet.com (Michael Kisielewski)]
Re: Carburator Problems? [Randy ]
test [johnmck juno.com (John R. McKee)]

=======================================================================

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Thu, 08 Jan 1998 19:04:55 -0600
From: "David J. Baldwin"
Subject: Re: Carburator Problems???

Mike(s):

This is probably not a ruptured power valve diaphragm problem ( you are
correct in your assessment that they are vulnerable to backfires), as
you would most likely be laying down a smoke stream of black smoke from
an EXTREMELY rich condition that results when the float bowl starts to
drain out through the rupture.

What I see is a small engine (300 six) with a four barrel on it. You
didn't mention which model the Holley is, but you may be
over-carbureted. If the carb is over 500 CFM, this is probably the
problem. I have a friend with a 250 chevy 6 with what sounds like the
same setup: dual exhaust headers, Offenhauser 4V intake. He has a 390
CFM Holley, and it is almost too big--flat spot on acceleration, but it
never stalls or pops back.

What can you do? First get some stuff:

(1) Holley used to make a "trick kit" (I think that was it), which
consisted of different springs for vacuum secondaries, accelerator pump
nozzles, accelerator pump cams, a couple of different vent baffles (you
don't need them), and maybe a few other things that I can't remember.
Get one of these if you want to try to make this thing work.

(2) Get some different power valves. Pick up an assortment so you can
try different ones.

Now you can try these things:

The first thing I would try are the accelerator pump cams. They're the
easiest to change. The originals put out most of their shot just as you
open the throttle, with very little once you're on the throttle part
way. So if you're cruising at, say, 60MPH, and the you stomp on it, the
pump may not put out enough. Then you get the flat spot on
acceleration. Some of the cams provide a more aggressive profile,
delivering more fuel per stroke (opening of the throttle).

If you get hesitation off the line, then you're likely not getting a big
enough shot from the accelerator pump from closed throttle. If going to
even the most aggressive pump cam doesn't help, try going to a larger
accelerator pump nozzle. This will dump more fuel in a shorter period
of time.

The key to this balance is to get the accelerator pump to provide enough
fuel for a long enough period of time to cover the sag in manifold
vaccuum between the time you stomp on the accelerator and when the
engine finally builds enough revs to get enough airflow through the
venturii to draw the proper fuel through the main jets.

When you're getting the accelerator pump calibrated, remember the
following:
Larger pump nozzle gives more fuel shot, but doesn't cover as long.
Smaller pump nozzle gives less fuel shot, but the shot lasts longer.

There's a happy balance in there somewhere. It just might take some
fiddling. Change one thing at a time. For example, swap cams until you
get the best response, then try nozzles until you find the right one.
Once you optimize the nozzle, you might have to go back and fiddle with
cams again to get it right, but you will converge on a solution.


.....UNLESS: you are hopelessly overcarbureted. In that case, the most
aggressive cam and biggest nozzle don't help enough. Holley used to
make a MONGO accelerator pump kit, but I wouldn't recommend it. If
things are that bad, get a smaller carb.

When you get your accel. pump tweaked in, if you have a small flat spot
during high-speed acceleration, you can put in a power valve that opens
at a higher manifold vacuum. Move up progressivly until the flat spot
goes away. You might experiment with jets as well, if you just can't
quite get it right with the valve alone. In that case, try increasing
jet size.

When you get to power valves and jets, you're in for more mess, since
you have to take the float bowl off every time. If you have the
dual-feed bowls, it's even worse (but you probably don't).

Keep us posted. I want to know how you come out on this.

- --
Best Regards,

Dave Baldwin
Dallas, TX
- --------------------------------------------------------------


Mike Marcum wrote:
>
> Mike,
>
> Has your engine experience a backfire through the carb in the last 1.5
> years?
>
> If so, then it is possible that your power valve is shot.
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Mike Johnson [SMTP:MikeJ granger-co.com]
> > Sent: Thursday, January 08, 1998 2:10 PM
> > To: 'fordtrucks80up listservice.net'
> > Subject: Carburator Problems???
> >
> > I read the problem that Mitch Biarsky
> > had with his '86 F250 w/351
> > on the fordtrucks80up-digest Friday, December 26 1997
> >
> > Did he or anyone else figure out what could be causing the problem?
> >
> > I have an 86 f150 with the 300 cid engine, with a holley 4 barrel,
> > header, duel exhaust.
> > it does the same hesitation thing, there is a dead spot (almost like
> > the
> > engine would stop) when starting from a stop light (engine cold or
> > warm). It also happens when cruising, and you take your foot off the
> > accelerator and then try to regain speed. I have to feather the
> > gas, to keep the truck running.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 08 Jan 1998 18:14:59 -0700
From: Bill Funk
Subject: Re: fordtrucks80up-digest V2 #14

> From: Mike Marcum
> Subject: RE: Carburator Problems???
>
> Mike,
>
> I am, by no means, an expert on Holley carbs. However, I have one,
> and
> have been researching solutions to problems similiar to those you have
>
> mentioned.
>
> Has your engine experience a backfire through the carb in the last 1.5
>
> years?
>
> If so, then it is possible that your power valve is shot. Holley's
> are
> infamous for having their power valves die due to a backfire. I have
> a
> 351 HO 4V in a 1986 F250, and it's Holley has similar problems. I
> bought a rebuild kit ($20) and a power valve saver($10), which is a
> little check-valve that screws into the bottom of the carb (some
> models
> require some drilling) and plugging of another hole. At any rate, it
> is
> supposed to protect your power valve from damage caused by a backfire.
>
> Summit Racing advertises one in their mail order catalog. I got mine
> at
> a local auto parts house.
>
> As I understand it, the powervalve squirts a stream of fuel when you
> punch the accellerator, which feeds the engine's needs, until enough
> vacuum is developed to open up the (vacuum)secondaries.
>
> I hope this gives you an idea to check out.
>
> - - Mike
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Mike Johnson [SMTP:MikeJ granger-co.com]
> > Sent: Thursday, January 08, 1998 2:10 PM
> > To: 'fordtrucks80up listservice.net'
> > Subject: Carburator Problems???
> >
> > I read the problem that Mitch Biarsky
> > had with his '86 F250 w/351
> > on the fordtrucks80up-digest Friday, December 26 1997
> >
> > Did he or anyone else figure out what could be causing the problem?
> >
> > I have an 86 f150 with the 300 cid engine, with a holley 4 barrel,
> > header, duel exhaust.
> > it does the same hesitation thing, there is a dead spot (almost like
>
> > the
> > engine would stop) when starting from a stop light (engine cold or
> > warm). It also happens when cruising, and you take your foot off the
>
> > accelerator and then try to regain speed. I have to feather the
> > gas, to keep the truck running.
> > It does it the worst during wet damp weather.
> >
> > my carb is only 1 1/2 old and i just replaced the plugs, cap, rotor
> > and
> > fuel filter.
> > All my vaccum hoses are good and i don't have any leaks anywhere.
> > I didn't try new wires because mine are only 1 1/2 old.
> >
> > any help would be greatly appreciated.
> >
> > Mike Johnson

I think the powrvalve is designed to allow extra fuel into the venturis
when the vacuum is low, but flow is high... when the engine needs more
fuel than the venturi system can provide.
The system Mike Marcum is speaking of, to shoot extra gas in the carb
when the throttle is openeing, is the accellerator pump, and it
certainly sounds as if this is is the problem here. To find out, one can
remove the air filter, climb up to be able to see into the carb from the
top, and open the throttle; a shot of gas should enter the venturi. The
gas should start as soon as the throttle opens. There's usually a lever
on the side of the carb pressing on a little nipple on the pump body;
there should be little to no free space between this actuating lever and
the nipple.

Bill Funk

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 8 Jan 1998 20:28:11 -0500
From: "Lare/Eric"
Subject: Re: Ranger problems

- -----Original Message-----
From: FastRngXLT
To: fordtrucks80up ListService.net
Date: Tuesday, January 06, 1998 4:10 AM
Subject: Re: Ranger problems


>In a message dated 98-01-05 23:12:29 EST, you write:
>
>
>brakes
> cool down. I can go to stop and just apply a little pressure and they
grab
> like I mashed the pedal to the floor. >>
>
> They must have upgraded th brakes since 94, You guys with the 94's are the
>only ones I have heard talk about brake or squeaking problems. My 96' 3.0
>brakes squeal a little after its been washed and direct presure had been
>sprayed on them or after a real good rain. As far as squeaks, I havent
heard
>any... yet.


My '94 Splash x-cab had the same grabbing squealing/problem in the wet after
about 12,000 miles were put on the truck. At 45,000 miles I put aftermarket
front pads, rear drums, rear pads, and rear hardware-64,000 miles, not a
single problem of grabbing/squealing yet.

Eric Smith - '94 Splash x-cab, 4x4

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 08 Jan 1998 20:44:21 -0600
From: Jim Orson
Subject: Re: fordtrucks80up-digest V2 #14

I installed a BugFlector II (from K-Mart) on my 97 Ranger. It works as
advertised and looks great. Not a single bug that hit it has survived
to my knowledge. It is the wrap around variety and was made
specifically for the Ranger. I would not trust the double sided tape to
hold it on. I installed mine using three or four small screws that came
with it. There was no problem installing it by myself. I believe it
cost about $30.

Jim Orson...

> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 08 Jan 1998 14:18:35 EST
> From: johnmck juno.com (John R. McKee)
> Subject: Bug Deflectors
>
> I would like to hear from owners who have installed bug deflectors.
> First, do they work as advertised? Secondly, which ones work the best?
> Lastly, do the ones which are attached with sticky tape really stay on?
>
> Thank-you,
> John
>
> ------------------------------
>

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 08 Jan 1998 23:07:45 -0800
From: Randy
Subject: Re: Bug Deflectors

John R. McKee wrote:
>
> I would like to hear from owners who have installed bug deflectors.
> First, do they work as advertised? Secondly, which ones work the best?
> Lastly, do the ones which are attached with sticky tape really stay on?
>
> Thank-you,
> John

John, I find it kinda hard to believe that they redirect everything that
comes over the hood. I have one on my '87 F-250. I put it on more for
aesthetics (sp?) I guess. I got the dark tinted, wrap around one that
conforms to the hood. It sits about an inch away on the average, but
never has it touched the hood even at excessive freeway speeds (or so my
friends told me, yeah, that's it). I too have noticed the problem w/the
windshield washer fluid, although, admittedly, I didn't know the source,
I bought my deflector two days after buying the truck, so I didn't have
anything to compare it to. I would go with the bolt-on kind for sure!
I don't trust tape for anything more than wrapping wires. There easy to
install, the shield wraps up under the front of the hood, so the screws
go up under there. If you're worried about corrosion/rust after
drilling into the hood, just get some silicone and place it over the
hole before you put the screw in. This will keep it well protected from
the elements. I got my tube from a friend who works for the phone co.
and use it for the crimp-on wire connectors too. Just put a layer on
the connector across the opening and push in the wire. Kind of the same
as the dielectric grease you have to put on your plug wire boots.
Randy

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 08 Jan 1998 18:15:34 -0700
From: Bill Funk
Subject: Re: Carburator Problems?

> From: Mike Marcum
> Subject: RE: Carburator Problems???
>
> Mike,
>
> I am, by no means, an expert on Holley carbs. However, I have one,
> and
> have been researching solutions to problems similiar to those you have
>
> mentioned.
>
> Has your engine experience a backfire through the carb in the last 1.5
>
> years?
>
> If so, then it is possible that your power valve is shot. Holley's
> are
> infamous for having their power valves die due to a backfire. I have
> a
> 351 HO 4V in a 1986 F250, and it's Holley has similar problems. I
> bought a rebuild kit ($20) and a power valve saver($10), which is a
> little check-valve that screws into the bottom of the carb (some
> models
> require some drilling) and plugging of another hole. At any rate, it
> is
> supposed to protect your power valve from damage caused by a backfire.
>
> Summit Racing advertises one in their mail order catalog. I got mine
> at
> a local auto parts house.
>
> As I understand it, the powervalve squirts a stream of fuel when you
> punch the accellerator, which feeds the engine's needs, until enough
> vacuum is developed to open up the (vacuum)secondaries.
>
> I hope this gives you an idea to check out.
>
> - - Mike
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Mike Johnson [SMTP:MikeJ granger-co.com]
> > Sent: Thursday, January 08, 1998 2:10 PM
> > To: 'fordtrucks80up listservice.net'
> > Subject: Carburator Problems???
> >
> > I read the problem that Mitch Biarsky
> > had with his '86 F250 w/351
> > on the fordtrucks80up-digest Friday, December 26 1997
> >
> > Did he or anyone else figure out what could be causing the problem?
> >
> > I have an 86 f150 with the 300 cid engine, with a holley 4 barrel,
> > header, duel exhaust.
> > it does the same hesitation thing, there is a dead spot (almost like
>
> > the
> > engine would stop) when starting from a stop light (engine cold or
> > warm). It also happens when cruising, and you take your foot off the
>
> > accelerator and then try to regain speed. I have to feather the
> > gas, to keep the truck running.
> > It does it the worst during wet damp weather.
> >
> > my carb is only 1 1/2 old and i just replaced the plugs, cap, rotor
> > and
> > fuel filter.
> > All my vaccum hoses are good and i don't have any leaks anywhere.
> > I didn't try new wires because mine are only 1 1/2 old.
> >
> > any help would be greatly appreciated.
> >
> > Mike Johnson

I think the powrvalve is designed to allow extra fuel into the venturis
when the vacuum is low, but flow is high... when the engine needs more
fuel than the venturi system can provide.
The system Mike Marcum is speaking of, to shoot extra gas in the carb
when the throttle is openeing, is the accellerator pump, and it
certainly sounds as if this is is the problem here. To find out, one can
remove the air filter, climb up to be able to see into the carb from the
top, and open the throttle; a shot of gas should enter the venturi. The
gas should start as soon as the throttle opens. There's usually a lever
on the side of the carb pressing on a little nipple on the pump body;
there should be little to no free space between this actuating lever and
the nipple.

Bill Funk

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 8 Jan 1998 22:10:59 EST
From: ILuvTruks
Subject: Re: Parking Position (Transmissions)

Actually, If you keep a few bricks or a cinder block in the car you could
theoretically set the brakes while you're not there hehehehe :-)

In a message dated 98-01-08 16:36:38 EST, you write:

> Since you can't "set" your service brakes
> without being within reaching distance of the brake pedal, the only way
> to comply with this law is to apply the parking brake.
>

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 07 Jan 1998 22:13:28 -0500
From: hunter cyberstreet.com (Michael Kisielewski)
Subject: Re: Parking

O.K. So if you're going to park on an incline and have a standard
tranny, put it in gear AND set the parking brake. For an automatic, put
it in park AND set the parking brake. PLUS if you're parked on an uphill
incline turn your front wheels away from the curb, on a downhill incline
turn the front wheels into the curb. That way if your tranny and parking
break can't do the job the vehicle only rolls until your tire hits the
curb. I am not responsible for any damages caused by using the above
suggestions. In Florida I don't normally have to worry about parking on
inclines but I still use my PARKING break when I park my truck. (That is
unless I'm using a Geo Metro as a wheel chock) Just as I use my turning
signal when turning and changing lanes, as I'm sure everyone else on
this list does.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 08 Jan 1998 23:19:57 -0800
From: Randy
Subject: Re: Carburator Problems?

Bill Funk wrote:
>
> The system Mike Marcum is speaking of, to shoot extra gas in the carb
> when the throttle is openeing, is the accellerator pump, and it
> certainly sounds as if this is is the problem here. To find out, one can
> remove the air filter, climb up to be able to see into the carb from the
> top, and open the throttle; a shot of gas should enter the venturi. The
> gas should start as soon as the throttle opens.

....


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