fordtrucks80up-digest Thursday, April 2 1998 Volume 02 : Number 121



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Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1980 - 1996 Trucks Digest
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In this issue:

Re: F-150 vs F-250 Brakes [petere mitre.org (Peter D. Engels)]
Brakes, again [Larry Wiandt ]
Re: F-150 vs F-250 Brakes [Bill Funk ]
Re: F-150 vs F-250 Brakes [Chris Hedemark ]
RE: F-150 vs F-250 Brakes ["Chad Royse" ]
Re: Got my truck [Randall Wer ]
RE: F-150 vs F-250 Brakes ["Patrick Vanderlind" ]
Calvin.... Ford Stickers ["Casey Vandor" ]
RE: 94- 7.3 diesel i.d. turbo -hard start ["Smeins, Larry"
RE: 94- 7.3 diesel i.d. turbo -hard start [alanh galaxy.nsc.com (The Hepb]
RE: F-150 vs F-250 brakes ["Mike Mueller" ]
1985 6-300 engine running rich [Beau Bush ]
Re: 300 Six Cylinder [butch ]
Re: 300 Six Cylinder [butch ]
intro and a few questions (long) [Del Hosner III ]
Re: intro and a few questions (long) [Randy ]
Re: intro and a few questions (long) [Thundercraft
Ford Truck Brake Problems ! ["watt gilbert" ]
Re: exhaust system costs [FoMoCoNUT2 ]
Re: Alarm System Suggestions [Horsepowrd ]
RE: Got my Truck [Anthony Rio ]

=======================================================================

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Apr 1998 08:40:34 -0500
From: petere mitre.org (Peter D. Engels)
Subject: Re: F-150 vs F-250 Brakes

I believe that the point being made by the previous poster was that, if
your truck's brakes will essentially lockup the wheels, better pads will
not improve things. Once the wheels are locked, or once the ABS system has
activated, better pads will make no difference. Its the tires that now
need to be improved.


>I have to disagree with the statement that all pads will stop the same.
>Look at what it takes to stop a vehilce. The kinetic energy in the forward
>motion is converted into heat by the brakes - the better a pad/rotor
>absorbs/dissapates the heat, the faster the vehicle stops. The pad material
>plays a very big part. So does the size of the rotor/drum. Thats why 12 inch
>brakes stop better than 10 inch brakes. The larger rotor is able to
>absorb/dissapte more heat than a smaller one. The coefficient of friction
>between the tires and the hiway naturally also plays in the equation - look
>at dry vs wet stopping.
>I'm sure others can explain it better than I.
>

>
>>
>>I have a problem with that last statement.
>>On my F250, I can press the brake pedal hard enough to activate the rear
>>ABS and keep the front tires on the verge of lockup. This is the best
>>braking available on the vehicle, and the limit is a function of the
>>tires, not the brake system.
>>Putting a Brembo system may alter how much pedal pressure is necessary
>>to do the same thing, but it can't alter the actual results.

Pete

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 02 Apr 1998 09:21:29 -0500
From: Larry Wiandt
Subject: Brakes, again

I've got a '93 F350 4x4 crew cab that I have never felt had the greatest
brakes. For one thing it will NOT lock up the brakes no matter how hard I
try. In fact the pedal will go almost to the floor under extreme braking.
After looking through some of the archives, I have seen numerous comments
about pads and I was thinking about trying a different brand but I am now
wondering about the booster or maybe a vacuum porblem. Has anyone had a
similar problem?

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 02 Apr 1998 07:39:14 -0700
From: Bill Funk
Subject: Re: F-150 vs F-250 Brakes

> From: "Mike Miller"
> Subject: Re: F-150 vs F-250 Brakes
>
> I have to disagree with the statement that all pads will stop the
> same.
> Look at what it takes to stop a vehilce. The kinetic energy in the
> forward
> motion is converted into heat by the brakes - the better a pad/rotor
> absorbs/dissapates the heat, the faster the vehicle stops. The pad
> material
> plays a very big part. So does the size of the rotor/drum. Thats why
> 12 inch
> brakes stop better than 10 inch brakes. The larger rotor is able to
> absorb/dissapte more heat than a smaller one. The coefficient of
> friction
> between the tires and the hiway naturally also plays in the equation -
> look
> at dry vs wet stopping.
> I'm sure others can explain it better than I.
>
> mike
> 85 F250 4x4, xcab,6.9l banks turbo.
>
> >
> >I have a problem with that last statement.
> >On my F250, I can press the brake pedal hard enough to activate the
> rear
> >ABS and keep the front tires on the verge of lockup. This is the best
>
> >braking available on the vehicle, and the limit is a function of the
> >tires, not the brake system.
> >Putting a Brembo system may alter how much pedal pressure is
> necessary
> >to do the same thing, but it can't alter the actual results.
> >There's an ad on TV now for some brake pad that mkaes the claim that
> no
> >other pads can stop the shown vehicle (a Sunurban) faster than their
> >brake pads. Why? Because they all stop the thing at the same rate,
> >because that rate is a function of the tire adhesion (traction), not
> the
> >brake pads. Note, the claim is not that their pads stop better, or
> >faster, but that none of the others can beat theirs, which makes
> sense,
> >since the pads are not the controlling factor in single stops.
> >Now, when we get to prolonged hard use, different pads make a
> >difference, but unless we are towing, or travelling a lot in hilly
> >country, or racing, that's not much of a problem.
> >
> >Bill Funk

Let's stop and consider what's being discussed.
We aren't talking about the relative merits of brake disk size, but
rather different pads on the same vehicle.
For single stops (read what I said, above), heat dissapation isn't a
great factor. Tire traction is the limiting factor.
Figure it: once you reach the limits of tire traction, changing pads
won't change anything. In a single stop, the average driver in the
average vehicle (which will have power brakes) will have no trouble
applying enough pressure tot he disks to bring the tires to the limit of
adhesion. Using pads that alter the pressure needed to achieve this
won't alter the point of adhesion loss.
Now, like I said above, if your driving requires heavy use of the
brakes, different pads will make a difference, but even here, there are
trade-offs. Metallic pads, for example, work better when hot, and
require more pressure until they reach optimum temperature. In a power
brake system, that extra pressure is not hard to get, but because we are
talking metal on metal (metallic pads, remember?), the disk wears
faster. Trade-offs.

Bill Funk

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 02 Apr 1998 09:56:35 -0500
From: Chris Hedemark
Subject: Re: F-150 vs F-250 Brakes

Bill Funk wrote:

> Let's stop and consider what's being discussed.
> We aren't talking about the relative merits of brake disk size, but
> rather different pads on the same vehicle.
> For single stops (read what I said, above), heat dissapation isn't a
> great factor. Tire traction is the limiting factor.

Y'all need to get some new tires. :-)

Seriously, the skinny tires that I see on a lot of trucks are bad for
traction (affecting both acceleration and deceleration as well as
off-pavement capabilities). Going to even a slightly wider tire will
help this tremendously (although possibly being slightly detrimental to
fuel economy and acceleration).

Considering that the tire is the only thing stopping you, really, would
you prefer a little 5 or 6 inch wide patch or something more like a 9
inch wide patch stopping you?

For 2WD trucks, I am *sold* on wider tires. Yeah, there is a cosmetic
aspect to it but also from a practicality standpoint I feel safer with a
275/60R15 under the truck than most "truck tires".

It's been awhile since I've had tires act as such a bottleneck in my
brake performance.

- --

Chris Hedemark - chris yonderway.com - http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.yonderway.com
"From the fury of the Norsemen, oh Lord, deliver us!"

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Apr 1998 09:47:56 -0500
From: "Chad Royse"
Subject: RE: F-150 vs F-250 Brakes

I have to agree with you. I wasn't going to bother the group with my brake
problems, but being as it is a hot topic... :)

I have a 97 250HD 4x4 460 SC LB. I know that when a vehicle sits for a day
or two in the rain that the brakes are extra sensitive due to surface rust.
When mine sits for a few days in the rain or heavy dew, stopping is almost
impossible. Here's what it seems like it's doing: It feels like when you
apply the brakes, even the slightest pedal pressure locks up one rear wheel.
After that, no matter how hard you press, the other wheels don't seem to
participate in helping me stop. I have twice now slid out into the street
(luckily no one was coming), because one rear wheel isn't worth squat when
it comes to stopping.

Any one heard of that one?

Chad

- -----Original Message-----
From: owner-fordtrucks80up ListService.net
[mailto:owner-fordtrucks80up ListService.net]On Behalf Of Bill Funk
Sent: Thursday, April 02, 1998 9:39 AM
To: fordtrucks80up ListService.net
Subject: Re: F-150 vs F-250 Brakes


> From: "Mike Miller"
> Subject: Re: F-150 vs F-250 Brakes
>
> I have to disagree with the statement that all pads will stop the
> same.
> Look at what it takes to stop a vehilce. The kinetic energy in the
> forward
> motion is converted into heat by the brakes - the better a pad/rotor
> absorbs/dissapates the heat, the faster the vehicle stops. The pad
> material
> plays a very big part. So does the size of the rotor/drum. Thats why
> 12 inch
> brakes stop better than 10 inch brakes. The larger rotor is able to
> absorb/dissapte more heat than a smaller one. The coefficient of
> friction
> between the tires and the hiway naturally also plays in the equation -
> look
> at dry vs wet stopping.
> I'm sure others can explain it better than I.
>
> mike
> 85 F250 4x4, xcab,6.9l banks turbo.
>
> >
> >I have a problem with that last statement.
> >On my F250, I can press the brake pedal hard enough to activate the
> rear
> >ABS and keep the front tires on the verge of lockup. This is the best
>
> >braking available on the vehicle, and the limit is a function of the
> >tires, not the brake system.
> >Putting a Brembo system may alter how much pedal pressure is
> necessary
> >to do the same thing, but it can't alter the actual results.
> >There's an ad on TV now for some brake pad that mkaes the claim that
> no
> >other pads can stop the shown vehicle (a Sunurban) faster than their
> >brake pads. Why? Because they all stop the thing at the same rate,
> >because that rate is a function of the tire adhesion (traction), not
> the
> >brake pads. Note, the claim is not that their pads stop better, or
> >faster, but that none of the others can beat theirs, which makes
> sense,
> >since the pads are not the controlling factor in single stops.
> >Now, when we get to prolonged hard use, different pads make a
> >difference, but unless we are towing, or travelling a lot in hilly
> >country, or racing, that's not much of a problem.
> >
> >Bill Funk

Let's stop and consider what's being discussed.
We aren't talking about the relative merits of brake disk size, but
rather different pads on the same vehicle.
For single stops (read what I said, above), heat dissapation isn't a
great factor. Tire traction is the limiting factor.
Figure it: once you reach the limits of tire traction, changing pads
won't change anything. In a single stop, the average driver in the
average vehicle (which will have power brakes) will have no trouble
applying enough pressure tot he disks to bring the tires to the limit of
adhesion. Using pads that alter the pressure needed to achieve this
won't alter the point of adhesion loss.
Now, like I said above, if your driving requires heavy use of the
brakes, different pads will make a difference, but even here, there are
trade-offs. Metallic pads, for example, work better when hot, and
require more pressure until they reach optimum temperature. In a power
brake system, that extra pressure is not hard to get, but because we are
talking metal on metal (metallic pads, remember?), the disk wears
faster. Trade-offs.

Bill Funk




+--------------- Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1980 - 1996 ----------------+
| Send posts to fordtrucks80up listservice.net, |
| List removal instructions on the website. |
+----------------- Site: http://www.ford-trucks.com -----------------+

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Apr 1998 07:26:58 -0800 (PST)
From: Randall Wer
Subject: Re: Got my truck

There is no such thing as a F-150 with a 4-cylinder. The straight six is
a good motor, with a good bottom end. Only problem is that it gets a
little winded at high speeds.

Randy Werth
1990 F-250 4x4

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Apr 1998 09:29:40 -0600
From: "Patrick Vanderlind"
Subject: RE: F-150 vs F-250 Brakes

> I have to agree with you. I wasn't going to bother the group with my brake
> problems, but being as it is a hot topic... :)
>
> I have a 97 250HD 4x4 460 SC LB. I know that when a vehicle sits for a day
> or two in the rain that the brakes are extra sensitive due to surface rust.
> When mine sits for a few days in the rain or heavy dew, stopping is almost
> impossible. Here's what it seems like it's doing: It feels like when you
> apply the brakes, even the slightest pedal pressure locks up one rear wheel.
> After that, no matter how hard you press, the other wheels don't seem to
> participate in helping me stop. I have twice now slid out into the street
> (luckily no one was coming), because one rear wheel isn't worth squat when
> it comes to stopping.
>
> Any one heard of that one?
>
> Chad
>

I had a '89 F250 Xcab 2wd and now I have a '93 F250 Xcab 4wd , a
brother in law with a '89 F250 4x4 as well as my brothers '90 F250
4x4 that do the very same thing! I do not believe it has anything
to do with surface rust. I back a boat into the water far enough that
the rear drums get wet. This problem happens here as well even
though the front disks are bone dry. (all 4 trucks!) The water
somehow is causing the mechanism to bite on one wheel. Not the
converse. (one not gripping). I can get it to do it also after
driving in the rain. I think it is a problem Ford should address
since I feel it has been going on far to long and it is quite
dangerous as you already know. Are there ant TSB's for this problem?


Any clues?


Patrick Vanderlind

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Apr 1998 06:49:09 -0900
From: "Casey Vandor"
Subject: Calvin.... Ford Stickers

If any of you have webpages, I have Calvin letting loose on a chebby
sticker, email me if you want it, It makes a link back to your homepage from
a truck link page :)

Casey cvandor eagle.ptialaska.net

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Apr 1998 08:47:31 -0700
From: "Smeins, Larry"
Subject: RE: 94- 7.3 diesel i.d. turbo -hard start

I don't know if this will apply to the International/Ford IDI diesel but
it comes from my old Mercedes 300D IDI diesel. On the MB the glow plug
opening into the pre combustion chamber would become clogged with
carbon. A partial clogging would keep the glow plug from igniting the
fuel as efficiently as it should and would result in difficult cold
starting. MB has a special tool for cleaning the port and recommends
cleaning whenever the glow plugs are replaced. Maybe someone
experienced in International diesels can provide info on whether they
have the same problem. On the MB I found doing a double cycle on the
glow plugs helped.

Larry

>Date: Wed, 1 Apr 1998 19:17:48 -0900 (AKST)
>From: Larry Rizzo
>Subject: 94- 7.3 diesel i.d. turbo -hard start

>I have replaced the check valve- 2 glow plugs-new glow plug timer
relay-
>checked the timing- serviced the fuel separter- 88k on engine but will
grind
>while doing a cold start..any hints?

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Apr 1998 07:59:38 -0800
From: alanh galaxy.nsc.com (The Hepburn)
Subject: RE: 94- 7.3 diesel i.d. turbo -hard start

> I don't know if this will apply to the International/Ford IDI diesel but
> it comes from my old Mercedes 300D IDI diesel. On the MB the glow plug
> opening into the pre combustion chamber would become clogged with
> carbon. A partial clogging would keep the glow plug from igniting the
> fuel as efficiently as it should and would result in difficult cold
> starting.

Just a slight modification: the glow plug doesn't ignite the fuel -
it heats the chamber, making the fuel easier to ignite. Small
difference, but if the job of the glow plug was to be an ignitor,
it'd be called a spark plug, and we all know diesels don't have
spark plugs!

- ---

Alan Hepburn | |
National Semiconductor | Proud to be part of the |
Santa Clara, Ca | Vast Right Wing Conspiracy |
alanh galaxy.nsc.com | |

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 02 Apr 98 09:02:03 PST
From: "Mike Mueller"
Subject: RE: F-150 vs F-250 brakes

Hey all!

>I have a problem with that last statement.
>...and the limit is a function of the tires, not the brake system.


>I have to disagree with the statement that all pads will stop the same.

but it's the limit that we are talking about here. A soft pad will gener=
ate more stopping friction than a metallic pad, but the limit is still =
the tires vs the road.

It seems I started this so I need to step back in and drop my .02 into =
the kitty.
My background is NOT in engineering. As a matter of fact, it's financial=
. I could address the direct and indirect costs of braking, but I'll spa=
re you all : )
But, I am a high speed driving instructor and have been a racer for many =
more years than I care to admit. Does that qualify me for anything? No, =
but I do have my own opinion!
The entire braking event can be broken down to one thing, Coefficient of =
friction!
The brakes are limited by the part of the car that has the lowest C/O of =
friction. The friction between the pads and the rotors starts the ball =
rolling but it really is the friction between the tires and the road surf=
ace that stops you. We practice with students what is called threshold =
braking, they drive at say 50 then stomp on the brakes as hard as they =
can without skidding (ABS turned off). It sounds simple but what they =
learn is that it's really a 2 stange event. As the brakes are first appl=
ied the weight transfers to the front wheels, when the bulk of the weight=
is over the front wheels the majority of the braking can then occur. =
A student will usually jam on the brakes and overload the front tires mak=
ing them skid. What we teach them is to depress the brake pedal firmly =
for the first mili-second or 2, then as the weight is transfered and the =
suspension is compressed the pedal can be really forced at that point, =
and the car then stops at the limit determined by the C/O of friction OF =
THE TIRES! After just 20 minutes of this excerise most students can beat=
the ABS system in their cars.
Now, lets say you were driving down the freeway, reach over to put a CD =
in, look up and everyone is stopped in front of you. You slam on the bra=
kes, your 89 supercab longbed's rear antilock activates and "all" the wei=
ght is transfered to the front tires. The friction between the tires and=
the road exceeds the limit and we start to skid. Now lets say all thing=
s being equal except I for some stange reason decide to put racing slicks=
on the truck, (and they are up to temp.) I slam on the brakes in just =
the same way and once again exceed the C/O for the tires and we once agai=
n skid, BUT we skidded later and stopped faster than with street tires! =


Really what would happen is that I would have dropped my portable TV just=
as the Devils scored short handed on a power play, and when looking back=
up I see a wall of stopped cars, I instinctively light up the rear tires=
, check both mirrors, swerve into the emergency lane in a 4 wheel drift, =
pass the obstruction and with a little throttle lift oversteer and trail =
braking, move back into my original lane while opening a new bag of Cheet=
- -os. Yeah, that's what would happen... that's the ticket!

I did leave out all discussion of 2 piston calipers, and boiling brake =
fluid, etc. but we can go into them later, eh?

Thanks!

Mike Mueller
The Leasing Dept.
Equipment Leasing and Funding
www.leasingdept.com

BTW: my favorite palindrome (sp?) (which is a sentence that reads both =
forwards and backwards) is... "Satan oscillate my metallic sonatas" No =
Satanic cult thing, I just thought it was cool.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Apr 1998 12:02:21 -0600
From: Beau Bush
Subject: 1985 6-300 engine running rich

I have a 1985 F150 with a 6-300 engine that is running very rich. The =
carburetor has been rebuilt several times in the past (in other words it =
is worn) and the lower throttle butterfly shaft does have some play =
allowing air to get in and some fuel residue is apparent on the outside =
of the shaft. Could this be causing the problem on way or another? =
Another concern is that even though 90% of the tubing and vacuum tubes =
are in place, some, especially the ones coming from the manifold, are =
rusted out. I don't know how important these are to maintaining a =
smooth running truck, but I have never really gotten it to even out at =
idle even with a newly rebuilt carb. =20

On behalf of the Mule,

Beau

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 21 Feb 1998 02:28:12 -0500
From: butch
Subject: Re: 300 Six Cylinder

butch wrote:
>
> I have to put my two cents abouy the six. I own a 1980 F350 one ton
> dump. It has been in my family since new. I have owned it since 1985,but
> have worked with it since new. I use the truck primarily for business,
> and tow with it a great deal. I have never had a chance to weigh the
> unit as a whole, but the flatbed trailer weighs 1700 pounds; and I can
> only guess at the weight of my Ford 1920 series tractor with loader
> backhoe. This truck has performed flawlessly and continues. It has
> always had plenty of power, and yes it does pass gas stations.

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 21 Feb 1998 02:29:39 -0500
From: butch
Subject: Re: 300 Six Cylinder

butch wrote:
>
> I have to put my two cents abouy the six. I own a 1980 F350 one ton
> dump. It has been in my family since new. I have owned it since 1985,but
> have worked with it since new. I use the truck primarily for business,
> and tow with it a great deal. I have never had a chance to weigh the
> unit as a whole, but the flatbed trailer weighs 1700 pounds; and I can
> only guess at the weight of my Ford 1920 series tractor with loader
> backhoe. This truck has performed flawlessly and continues. It has
> always had plenty of power, and yes it does pass gas stations.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 02 Apr 1998 17:42:28 -0500
From: Del Hosner III
Subject: intro and a few questions (long)

Hello, all. I'm brand new to this list (signed-on yesterday). I live
in the Detroit, Mich area (Shelby Twp.) and drive a red/grey '92 F-250,
460, ZF, 4x4 SC LB w/ optional Texas plates (family lives in San
Antonio) and Ranch Hand Cattle Guard and rear bumper.

Now that that's out of the way, I would like to pick your collective
brains about the following:

The above listed vehicle consumes oil at the rate of 1 qt/500 mi. The
engine has 190k miles, but runs extremely strong. (I bought truck in
12/96 w/ 148k miles). I believe that the oil is being lost through the
valve seals because;
a. Mobil 1 Synthetic used exclusively for life of engine, which
would seem to reduce the likelihood of worn piston rings.
b. Suspected heavy carbon build-up in combustion chambers. I must
use 92 or higher octane rating gas or else engine spark knocks.
Timing is dead-on.
c. Engine does not leak oil.
Now, having said all that, I have never seen the tell-tale blue smoke
from the tail pipe, nor have I smelled oil burning.

So, what do you think? Do any of you mechanics (professional or
otherwise) think that I am correct in my preliminary 'valve-seal'
diagnosis? Please let me know what you think. Whatever it turns out to
be, do any of you Detroit-area listers know of/recommend a shop where I
should have the work done?

TIA

Del

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 02 Apr 1998 19:47:08 -0800
From: Randy
Subject: Re: intro and a few questions (long)

Del,
Usually, the smoke would blow out at start up, the oil leaks down into
the cylinders and burns when you first start the motor. Check the
archives, there was a guy on here a few months ago that had the same
problem as you and the same motor. I don't recall the outcome,
though, sorry. I'd guess maybe 3-4 mths ago? Anyone else recall
that?
Later,
Randy
p.s. Welcome to the list

Del Hosner III wrote:
>
> Hello, all. I'm brand new to this list (signed-on yesterday). I live
> in the Detroit, Mich area (Shelby Twp.) and drive a red/grey '92 F-250,
> 460, ZF, 4x4 SC LB w/ optional Texas plates (family lives in San
> Antonio) and Ranch Hand Cattle Guard and rear bumper.
>
> Now that that's out of the way, I would like to pick your collective
> brains about the following:
>
> The above listed vehicle consumes oil at the rate of 1 qt/500 mi. The
> engine has 190k miles, but runs extremely strong. (I bought truck in
> 12/96 w/ 148k miles). I believe that the oil is being lost through the
> valve seals because;
[snip]

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 02 Apr 1998 17:15:14 -0800
From: Thundercraft
Subject: Re: intro and a few questions (long)

Randy wrote:
>
> Del,
> Usually, the smoke would blow out at start up, the oil leaks down into
> the cylinders and burns when you first start the motor.
>
>
engine has 190k miles, but runs extremely strong. (I bought truck in
> > 12/96 w/ 148k miles). I believe that the oil is being lost through the
> > valve seals because;

broken/missing/hardened valve seals can cause smoking at startup and
under heavy vacuum such as decelerating in a low gear down a hill. It
could be more than just seals, the valve guides could be worn as well.
However, if it isn't too bad, don't do anything. If you get ambitious
and do a valve job, you may find that it uses even more oil because now
suddenly the top end is tight and now it starts pulling oil through the
rings.

Maybe try changing the oil weight.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 02 Apr 1998 18:12:56 -0700
From: "watt gilbert"
Subject: Ford Truck Brake Problems !

I have a '91 F-250 that has had brake problems from the day that it was
new. I realise now that I should have brought a lemon law suit, but one time it
went 15 months with no trouble and I thought it was fixed until it burned up both
front calipers.

The F-250 has a dual piston caliper and seems to have the most trouble
with the right side sticking. The first few times that mine stuck, I didn't know
what was wrong with the truck because I had never had a problem like that, but I
had to have the rotors turned.

I would appreciate it if everyone who has had these problems would go
to the NHTSA and file a complaint. If we could get enough complaints maybe Ford would
have to do something about these trucks.
This problem is widespread and deserves a recall. If we can't get a recall, who's
up for a class action lawsuit?

NHTSA e-mail http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov
Phone (888)327-4236

Thanks;
Watt Gilbert




Free web-based email, Forever, From anywhere!
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.mailexcite.com

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Apr 1998 21:17:39 EST
From: FoMoCoNUT2
Subject: Re: exhaust system costs

In a message dated 98-04-01 23:11:16 EST, you write:


and a big free flowing aluminized all welded seam truck muffler >>

Was this at a well known, like national company? or a local job? I am now in
the market for a complete system for the daily driver and am curious. Thanks

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Apr 1998 22:02:37 EST
From: Horsepowrd
Subject: Re: Alarm System Suggestions

Alpine alarms are Great. I install them and love them. I would recommend
the Radar sensor, a second siren, and also Horn Honk. Alpine also does have a
Pager system you can add, range is limited, but anything helps. Another
really cool feature on some of the Alpine alarms is the choice of normally
open or normally closed starter kill. normally closed means that thw starter
is only disabled when the alarm is armed. with normally open the starter is
always cut and only is enabled as long as the alarm has power, this means that
someone just can't cut power to the alarm and start the vehicle.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Apr 1998 21:15:58 -0600
From: Anthony Rio
Subject: RE: Got my Truck

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Scottie...

I have a '94 with the straight six. Way better the a V4. The I-6 is a horse...

- -----Original Message-----
From: Scottie Schmidt [SMTP:scottie.schmidt mailexcite.com]
Sent: Wednesday, April 01, 1998 2:09 PM
To: fordtrucks80up listservice.net
Subject: Got my Truck

Hi, I sent a message out last week stating that i was looking for a F-150 older than
a 95 and new than a 88. I got a couple of reply and i would like to thank all of
you who did reply. Well i got a 1994 F-150 with 125,000 miles, bedliner, AC, 5 speed,
new back tires, and it is a straight six, and i only paid about $5,000. I was wondering
if a straight six is better than a 4 cylendar, or worst than a 6 cylendar or what??
Also i posted a message asking about what type of truck would be best for a 14.5
acre farm. I got replies telling me what kind of truck would be good but i had know
idea what kind of truck they were telling me about. The only Ford trucks i know
about are the F-150,250,350 and Superduty. If anyone could tell me which one of
those would be best that would be great!! The person who i am requesting this information
for is buying the farm and will be raising Alpackas, bording horses, and will have
chickens and a couple of dogs. They are looking for a good truck for this type of
farm in the price of about $10,000. Any information would be greatfuly appreciated.

Thanks,
Scottie




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