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Date: Sat, 25 Oct 1997 03:50:19 -0600 (MDT)
From: owner-fordtrucks80up-digest ListService.net (fordtrucks80up-digest)
To: fordtrucks80up-digest ListService.net
Subject: fordtrucks80up-digest V1 #190
Reply-To: fordtrucks80up ListService.net
Sender: owner-fordtrucks80up-digest ListService.net


fordtrucks80up-digest Saturday, October 25 1997 Volume 01 : Number 190



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Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1980 And Newer Trucks Digest
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In this issue:

Tailgates up or down?? ["jason" ]
Re: fordtrucks80up-digest V1 #188 ["Alan Heaberlin" ]
Re: SEMA show ["WK" ]
Blue Smoke [quadrai oberon.ark.com (quadrai)]
Blue Smoke [quadrai oberon.ark.com (quadrai)]
Blue Smoke [quadrai oberon.ark.com (quadrai)]

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Date: Fri, 24 Oct 1997 23:10:17 -0400
From: "jason"
Subject: Tailgates up or down??

This is correct. According to what i read--and this is the unscientific
version--
trucks are aerodynamically designed so that when you drive oncoming air
passes over
the roof of the cab and completely avoids the "bubble" of air that is
formed in the
bed. The tailgate "traps" this "bubble". After hauling hay in the back
of our
truck, I will be driving down the highway and in the rear view mirror will
notice
the little pieces of leftover hay sort of moving slowly in a circular
motion;
even though air is passing over the truck at 55 or 60 mph, the pieces of
hay never
leave the area defined by the "bubble"--and thereby confirms its existence.
I used
to keep the tailgate off--i used a piece of 3/4 inch pipe to hold the two
sides of
the truck apart. But ever since putting the tailgate back on, my mileage
has
increased pretty dramatically. very counterintuitive (there's a good
word!).
regards david

David: I seem to have the opposite results. After unloading, If I leave the
tailgate down, almost all of the residue blows out exept for a one foot
area just behind the cab. If I raise the gate, the truck bed remains full
of stuff. What happens is the gate causes your bubble. and the stuff goes
up and back in. With the gate down the stuff goes up and out.
I find the opposite gas mileage results also. Better down.
I took a very long trip with a Tournou cover and, Boy did that help.

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 25 Oct 1997 00:10:42 -0700
From: "Alan Heaberlin"
Subject: Re: fordtrucks80up-digest V1 #188

> From: silent.bob juno.com (Silent . Bob)
> > Subject: Re: 97 Ranger cutting out 100+ mph
> >
> > On Wed, 22 Oct 1997 10:02:47 -0500 "David J. Baldwin"
>
> > writes:
> > >Mike Wiatt wrote:
> >
> > >You might try looking in to the presence of a vehicle speed
> limiter.
> > >The EEC also knows what vehicle speed is, and it is possible that

> they
> > >limit the Ranger top speed because of stability concerns.
> >
> >
> > This is true. A Ranger will start to "float" at 100mph.
> >
> I doubt that the EEC knows anything more than engine rpm--speedwise.

> As an
> automotive test driver working daily at speeds in excess of 110mph
> (650
> miles per day usually) what I do know is that the air conditioning
> will cut
> out in high gear at WOT to reserve engine power for the drive
wheels.
> I
> would suspect fuel flow or pressure or perhaps air intake
restriction
> (dirty air cleaner). Let us know what you find out!
> Buffalo Al
> --------------------------------
>
> Silent Bob,
>
> It is obvious that you do not test drive Ford trucks for a living.
> You might be a good driver but your knowledge of what EEC's and
> computers are capable of these days is lacking. Stick to driving
> them not diagnosing them.
>
> - --UNS_gsauns2_2726165301--

My, aren't we touchy?! In the first place, I would not presume to diagnose
a vehicle I had not seen. Otherwise, my first suggestion would be to change
the spark plugs like the jerkwater mechanic down the street always says.
I simply tried to provide some logical possibilities to a question on the
board.
I am very familiar with OBD-II engine monitoring equipment and I am aware
that it does track many, many data points for later retrieval. But let me
get this straight... Are you saying that a 1997 Ford Ranger DOES have a
computerized vehicle speed limiter to prevent float at 100mph? I don't mean
an engine rev limiter either. I think a lot of Ranger owners would like to
know about this!
I think if you are going to be rude about it all, you ought to state your
own credentials and back it up with some facts. Document title and page
numbers would be helpful.
It seems to me that this forum is a mixing bowl for Ford truck owners of
all levels of experience and a desire to learn and keep our stuff running.
If you have expert advice to offer, fine. It might be nice to qualify your
expertise with something besides a snotty comment with no practical
alternative advice or information. I stated my comparative level of
experience and my point of view. I certainly did not give any indication
that I know it all!
Personal comments (or insults) should be made off of the group. Contact me
personally if you will at...buffaloal hotmail.com!
Sincerely,
Buffalo Al

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 25 Oct 1997 02:28:20 -0500
From: "WK"
Subject: Re: SEMA show

> Date: Thu, 23 Oct 1997 14:58:13 -0700
> From: William Street
> Subject: SEMA show
>
> Anyone know when the SEMA show in Las Vegas is? How about a contact
> for SEMA (phone, email, web, etc.).

Hey Bill,
SEMA show 97 Las Vegas Convention Center, November 4th-7th
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.sema.org/

[]-/\-[] Warren Kurtz
{ } wkurtz sky.net
[]\_/[] http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.sky.net/~wkurtz

Kurtz Kustomz Motorsports
SCCA SOLO-II 263 DSP

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 25 Oct 1997 01:24:04 -0700
From: quadrai oberon.ark.com (quadrai)
Subject: Blue Smoke

My friend, Frank, has a 1984 Ford Ranger w/ 2.8L Engine w/ 179,000 km. At
168,000 km
took it to an automotive shop for repair, since it was emitting Blue Smoke.
They told him that they would have to replace the rings, grind the valves
and replace new end valve seals, but that the valve guides were O.K. The
repairs were completed. Now, Blue Smoke has returned. This time it is a
little different, when you start and stop forward or reverse at slow speeds
, the problem occurs. a fair amount is visible. Also, a liter of oil will be
burnt every two days if you do that all day. However, if you drive at
continous speed all day very little smoke is observed and little oil is
lost, but more than normal,

Please comment and help solve the mystery, I have my own ideas, but want to
hear from others,

Thanks,

Tim

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 25 Oct 1997 01:24:39 -0700
From: quadrai oberon.ark.com (quadrai)
Subject: Blue Smoke

My friend, Frank, has a 1984 Ford Ranger w/ 2.8L Engine w/ 179,000 km. At
168,000 km
took it to an automotive shop for repair, since it was emitting Blue Smoke.
They told him that they would have to replace the rings, grind the valves
and replace new end valve seals, but that the valve guides were O.K. The
repairs were completed. Now, Blue Smoke has returned. This time it is a
little different, when you start and stop forward or reverse at slow speeds
, the problem occurs. a fair amount is visible. Also, a liter of oil will be
burnt every two days if you do that all day. However, if you drive at
continous speed all day very little smoke is observed and little oil is
lost, but more than normal,

Please comment and help solve the mystery, I have my own ideas, but want to
hear from others,

Thanks,

Tim

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 25 Oct 1997 01:24:49 -0700
From: quadrai oberon.ark.com (quadrai)
Subject: Blue Smoke

My friend, Frank, has a 1984 Ford Ranger w/ 2.8L Engine w/ 179,000 km. At
168,000 km
took it to an automotive shop for repair, since it was emitting Blue Smoke.
They told him that they would have to replace the rings, grind the valves
and replace new end valve seals, but that the valve guides were O.K. The
repairs were completed. Now, Blue Smoke has returned. This time it is a
little different, when you start and stop forward or reverse at slow speeds
, the problem occurs. a fair amount is visible. Also, a liter of oil will be
burnt every two days if you do that all day. However, if you drive at
continous speed all day very little smoke is observed and little oil is
lost, but more than normal,

Please comment and help solve the mystery, I have my own ideas, but want to....


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