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Date: Fri, 5 Sep 1997 15:03:51 -0600 (MDT)
From: owner-fordtrucks80up-digest ListService.net (fordtrucks80up-digest)
To: fordtrucks80up-digest ListService.net
Subject: fordtrucks80up-digest V1 #94
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fordtrucks80up-digest Friday, September 5 1997 Volume 01 : Number 094



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Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1980 And Newer Trucks Digest
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In this issue:

Re: F-250 Powerstroke [Bill Funk ]
Re: F-250 Powerstroke ["Patrick Vanderlind" ]
Powerstroke questions ["Mike Jones"]
Sloppy Drive Train [Bakend aol.com]
Re: F-250 Powerstroke [Jay Chlebowski ]
[none] [David McCormick ]
Re: F-250 Powerstroke ["C. E. White" ]
Re: F-250 Powerstroke [John Yee ]
Re: F-250 Powerstroke [Jay Chlebowski ]
RE: fordtrucks80up-digest V1 #93 [Larry Smeins ]
Re: Sloppy Drive Train ["David J. Baldwin" ]
Re: F-250 Powerstroke [John Yee ]

=======================================================================

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Fri, 05 Sep 1997 05:11:03 -0700
From: Bill Funk
Subject: Re: F-250 Powerstroke

> Date: Thu, 4 Sep 1997 10:53:58 -0700
> From: John Yee
> Subject: Re: F-250 Powerstroke

...

> I'm getting the impression that many who tow a large 5th wheel or
> large
> slide-in camper are either at the limit, or exceeding either the
> payload rating
> or GCRW. While some of the issues can be compensated by conservative/
> defensive driving habits and higher maintennance schedules; not all
> issues can.
> I'm trying to figure out what those are.
>
> - -john

When you exceed the Gross Combined Weight Rating, you overstress a few
components.The engine, cooling system, clutch/torque converter,
transmission, differential and rear bearings, and brakes.
Nothing important... :-)
I'm amazed at the fact that some people are actually towing 40-foot
fifth-wheel trailers with pickups. Many of these behomeths weigh over
12,000 lbs dry, on a truck that has a towing capacity of about 7500 lbs.
Figure it out: take the GCWR, and deduct the weight of the loaded truck
(by loaded, I mean with full fuel tank(s), both dogs, all passengers,
hitch, food & beer, maps, the whole shootin' match. What's left is the
towing capacity. This is usually far below the *rated* maximum towing
capacity, which most people use as their towing target.
Those who want to tow trailers of this size are much better off buying a
medium duty truck; something like a two-ton truck with the capacity to
tow such trailers. These trucks can be had, used, for reasonable prices,
and can be made very comfortable.
I'd hate to see what would happen if, towing a trailer two tons over
your weight limit, something goes wrong, and you hurt someone. Even a
drunk lawyer could get a good judgement out of that.

Bill Funk

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 5 Sep 1997 08:24:40 -6000
From: "Patrick Vanderlind"
Subject: Re: F-250 Powerstroke

>
> When you exceed the Gross Combined Weight Rating, you overstress a few
> components.The engine, cooling system, clutch/torque converter,
> transmission, differential and rear bearings, and brakes.
> Nothing important... :-)
> I'm amazed at the fact that some people are actually towing 40-foot
> fifth-wheel trailers with pickups. Many of these behomeths weigh over
> 12,000 lbs dry, on a truck that has a towing capacity of about 7500 lbs.
> Figure it out: take the GCWR, and deduct the weight of the loaded truck
> (by loaded, I mean with full fuel tank(s), both dogs, all passengers,
> hitch, food & beer, maps, the whole shootin' match. What's left is the
> towing capacity. This is usually far below the *rated* maximum towing
> capacity, which most people use as their towing target.
> Those who want to tow trailers of this size are much better off buying a
> medium duty truck; something like a two-ton truck with the capacity to
> tow such trailers. These trucks can be had, used, for reasonable prices,
> and can be made very comfortable.
> I'd hate to see what would happen if, towing a trailer two tons over
> your weight limit, something goes wrong, and you hurt someone. Even a
> drunk lawyer could get a good judgement out of that.
>
> Bill Funk
>

I see a much worse abuse of a tow vehicle around here. There are
several folks who think that a F150 is "tough enough" as they would
say to tow their fifth wheel or travel trailer. I tow a 30-foot
travel trailer that weighs around 7000lbs with my F250 and
theirs are as heavy and sometimes even heavier. Some even tow a fifth
wheel, and attached to the fifth wheel is a boat! With a half ton!
The laws are way to slack in my opinion. They are playing with other
peoples lives! I urge anyone who tows a large trailer to bite the
bullet and buy a F250 or F350. If you do not think there are that
many differences, pull a front and a rear wheel off of a F150 and off
of a F250 and take a look at the differences!



Patrick Vanderlind
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
'93 F250 xcab XLT 4x4 red/red Diesel

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 5 Sep 1997 10:06:51 -0400
From: "Mike Jones"
Subject: Powerstroke questions

>Date: Thu, 04 Sep 1997 12:16:18 PDT
>From: meadjr minotafb.ndak.net
>Subject: F-250 Powerstroke
>What options and packages shoud I get when we order our F-250? We plan on
getting a slide in pop-up camper for it >also. What gears and tranie would
be the best for this use.
>Thanks
>
>JJ
My 'stroke has the manual and 3.55 gears, and I'm quite happy with this
combo since I do most of my driving on the interstate at 80+ mph and wanted
the lower rpms 3.55 gears give. If I were in an area where 65-70 mph was
all that was practical, I may have gone with the 4.10 gears (still w/ a
manual trans) because 2nd gear is just a little too tall for good
off-the-line starts without more clutch slippage than I like. The turbo
does take a little time to spool up.
Either ratio will give you all the towing capability you're likely to need.
I tow a 4000 lb boat in mountainous terrain, and it's the rare hill that
requires a downshift out of fifth.

Most people would probably be happier with an auto trans, though, since the
clutch on the manual is pretty stiff and there doesn't seem to be any
mileage penalty w/ the auto. Really, though, it's personal preference.
Either is up to the task.

I would definitely order the cruise control/tilt wheel from the factory,
since there are no aftermarket cruise control kits on the market. (Which
is stupid, since I added cruise to mine with about ten dollars worth of
Radio Shack parts -- all the inputs to the computer are already present
except for some switches and resisters, but that's a different story...)

I have the standard cloth bench seat, and my wife is forever compaining
about not being able to recline. Order the 60/40 seat!

The Ride-Rite auxilliary air (spring) bags work as-advertised -- they're
great. Watch out for a false sense of security, though. You're still top
heavy.

My two cents worth (or maybe about four cents...)

Mike J.

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 5 Sep 1997 12:11:39 -0400 (EDT)
From: Bakend aol.com
Subject: Sloppy Drive Train

Hi,
I have a 1987 Ranger with 2.9 efi 5spd 4X4 ext cab. No fancy tires or
wheels just stock. I bought the truck this spring with 135K miles. I traded
an 84 B2 in for it that never gave me any problems in over 170K. The Ranger
is a differnt story however. On a recent trip (400 miles one way) something
in the drive train locked up! The truck wouldn't move. I could not move the
shifter from first gear. I checked underneath and all looked fine(no drive
shaft broken etc) Locked in four wheel and low range I popped the clutch
acouple of times and finally with a bang it broke loose. Drove about 50 feet
and it locked again,sending my daugher (not belted in) to meet the
windshield. This time though it broke loose by itself. I suspected the
rearend had gone bad because it was real sloppy before. Went to a junk yard
and got a replacement in and headed home. Made it back, but still have too
much play in the drive train and the driver side front hub (automatic) makes
a clicking noise on hard left turns. Any suggestions from the more
experienced out there?
Thanks for any help
Dennis Baken
Denver

1967 Mustang
1978 F350(460) gas hog
1979 Capri
1987 Ranger
1993 Lumina (Wife's car)

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 5 Sep 97 11:41:45 -0500
From: Jay Chlebowski
Subject: Re: F-250 Powerstroke

On 9/4/97 12:53 PM , John Yee wrote:

>At 01:35 PM 9/4/97 -0500, you wrote:
>>JJ,
>>
>>There are tons options available for this truck. 4.10 Gears are nice
>>to have, but if you want a tiny bit better mileage (1-2 mpg) get the
>>3.55 gears. The 4.10 gears are better for acceleration. The auto
>>tranny in this truck works great, but if you feel you need the manual,
>> it works fine, too.
>>
>>The options and packages are up to your needs. If you want a
>>luxurious truck, get it fully loaded. If you only need it bare bones,
>> get want you want. I find cruise control a necessity in everything.
>
>I too am going through this.
>
>I'd also suggest scoping out the slide in camper, that you want to get.
>Powerstroke's eats up about 500 lbs of payload capacity on the 1997. As an
>example, the 1997 Ford towing guide says about 3000 lbs of payload (with
>2 passegers) for a 4x4 F-250 longbed with 460/manual, and about 2500 lbs
>payload with the powerstroke. Additional options such as automatic
>transmission, eat in to the specified payload.
>
>Toys, food, towable toys, etc also need to be accounted for.
>
>I have one friend who probably exceeds the rated payload by about 1000 lbs.
>While the vehicle is claimed to be fairly stable, due to additions of good
>shocks and airbags, I do not fully understand the penalties that would
>be involved in emegency manuvers, and longevity of drive train/suspension
>components.
>
>I'm getting the impression that many who tow a large 5th wheel or large
>slide-in camper are either at the limit, or exceeding either the payload
>rating
>or GCRW. While some of the issues can be compensated by conservative/
>defensive driving habits and higher maintennance schedules; not all issues
>can.
>I'm trying to figure out what those are.
>
>
>-john

At the risk of being flamed by those who strictly follow the guidelines
(and don't get the impression that I'm advocating being careless,
either), let me note that we haven't used a truck on our farms that
wasn't extremely over the GVWR/GCWR.

I've got a F350 4x4 Crew Cab Powerstroke, that I pull grain trailers with
out of the fields. Our trailers are 300 bushel, and corn is around
60lbs/bushell. That's 18,000 lbs in corn, plus the weight of trailer
itself (all steel and iron). This is connected with a gooseneck hitch,
and we pull them through the fields (in 4HI and 4LOW - depending on the
ground), over levees, and down highways (up to even 55mph). In fact,
we've even pulled them with a Chevy K1500 reg cab (talk about exceeding
the rating!!!). Never, and I repeat never, have we had a problem or
safety issue (knock on wood), and the Chevy has run 160,000 miles working
under loads like that, and the rear carrier bearings have been replaced
only once (no bent tubes or anything -- that truck is kinda' amazing).

We've used 1-ton Chevys' 3/4HD Dodge's with Cummins Diesels, and now my
Powerstroke, and I can say from experience that most ratings on trucks
amount to the lawyers' interpretation of worst case failure rates.

However, I'll be the first to admit that what we do is not even similar
to pulling a large 5th wheel RV up and down 6% grades at highway speeds.
There's different forces at work there, and alot of the safety in those
situations is derived from the driver's experience and caution. However,
I don't believe it's necessarily unsafe to have larger trucks on the road
traveling over their Mfg-rated GVWR/GCWR.

Heh, it's only my 2-cents :-)

Best Regards,
Jay

------------------------------

Date: 05 Sep 97 10:56:03 +0000
From: David McCormick
Subject: [none]

John Yee, good post. The reduced payload in the F-250 Powerstroke can
catch you by surprise. The dealer can and should give you a sheet of paper
with the exact payload for your truck with all options and accesories
added on. For a heavy slide in, you may have to look at beefing the
suspension (eg. helper springs or air springs) or going to a one ton truck. I have
the 4.10 gears on my 96 F-250 Powerstroke, but for as much as I haul
heavy loads or my slide in camper, I think I would go with the 3.55 gears if I
had it to do over.

Good luck.

Dave McCormick
mccormickd njc.org

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 06 Sep 1997 13:05:38 -0400
From: "C. E. White"
Subject: Re: F-250 Powerstroke

Bill Funk wrote:

> I'm amazed at the fact that some people are actually towing 40-foot
> fifth-wheel trailers with pickups. Many of these behomeths weigh over
> 12,000 lbs dry, on a truck that has a towing capacity of about 7500 lbs..........
>
> Bill Funk

Farmers at home routinely tow cattle trailers, peanut trailers and
cotton trailers that are worse than 40 foot boats. I just sold 23 calves
with an average weigh of 500 lbs (11,500+ lbs for the calves alone) plus
the wight of a 40 foot fifth wheel cattle trailer. I would guest the
total weight was over 14,000 lbs. This set-up was towed by a Dodge
Pick-up with a Cummins Turbo-Diesel. It did have electric brakes...which
failed half-way through a 180 mile one way trip. I have seen one guy tow
a peanut trailer (which weighed over 10,000 lbs with wet peanuts in it)
with a regular Ford F-150. And this was hooked to the bumper...with no
trailer brakes. I wouldn't do it with mine, but it is amazing what you
can get away with.

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 5 Sep 1997 10:28:04 -0700
From: John Yee
Subject: Re: F-250 Powerstroke

>However, I'll be the first to admit that what we do is not even similar
>to pulling a large 5th wheel RV up and down 6% grades at highway speeds.
>There's different forces at work there, and alot of the safety in those
>situations is derived from the driver's experience and caution. However,
>I don't believe it's necessarily unsafe to have larger trucks on the road
>traveling over their Mfg-rated GVWR/GCWR.

Thanks for the info.

More specifically, here's what I'm trying to plan for.

I'm looking into a 1999 F250 4x4, xlt, 4 door extended cab (not crew cab),
shortbed, auto (if available),4:10 gears, with a power stroke, and reasonbly
loaded up. The near term goals of this vehicle is to carry a slide in
camper such as a lance 3000 or 185 squire lite. And a longer term goal on
planning to additionally tow up to a 5000 lb boat/trailer.

Using a rough calculation of 2500 lbs wet for the camper, and about 500 lbs of
tongue weight of trailer thats 3000lbs of payload. This does not yet include
food, clothes, toys, which could easily get up to 500 additional pounds.

At this point, while I'm under the the GCWR, I've exceeded the payload rating by
about 1000 lbs.
I don't believe i've exceeded the axle rating at this point for either the front
or the rear axles, but I haven't done the math yet.

With no options and manual transmission, the 1997 Ford tow guide rates the
diesel F250 described above at 2500 lbs of payload. With additional factory
options, this rating could be cut to about 2300 lbs of payload.

So now we are at 1200 lbs over payload.

I'm under the GCWR, and at the recommended (by rec.outdoor.rv.travel) 75%
limit.
Other saftey/stablity add ons will include, better shocks, airbags rear, and
front (if necessary), and wider tires. (thanks Joe).

If I replace the stock 19 gal tank with a 45 gallon tank, this adds another
300 lbs.

At this point, I will stop. On the assumption I've under the GCWR, and under the
axle ratings, I will be over the payload limit by 1200 - 1500+ lbs.

And finally the questions... While it can be done:...
(I'm interested in perspectives on heavy payload, vs. heavy towing
characteristics).

Is this rig safe at freeway speeds (no more than 70-75 on the flats)?
6% downhill grade concerns?
Any additional suspension mods needed?
Would you feel safe with this rig/setup?

thanks and apologies for being so anal/long-winded about this.

- -john

Note: I've considered the F350, but I'm not sure I can get the same
configuration in a 1999 F250. It also has to fit in the garage.
And I really don't want a Dodge Ram :-).

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 5 Sep 97 14:09:46 -0500
From: Jay Chlebowski
Subject: Re: F-250 Powerstroke

On 9/5/97 12:28 PM , John Yee wrote:

>More specifically, here's what I'm trying to plan for.
>
>I'm looking into a 1999 F250 4x4, xlt, 4 door extended cab (not crew cab),
>shortbed, auto (if available),4:10 gears, with a power stroke, and reasonbly
>loaded up. The near term goals of this vehicle is to carry a slide in
>camper such as a lance 3000 or 185 squire lite. And a longer term goal on
>planning to additionally tow up to a 5000 lb boat/trailer.

The only hitch I can see is the short bed - this will reduce stability by
a large margin once you put the truck under load, and I wouldn't want to
tow a trailer with a short, heavily loaded bed.

Also, where did you find the info noting that the ext. cabs would be
4-doors. I've been searching and snapping up bits of info on the new HD
trucks, and hadn't heard that one yet. BTW, one rumor notes that both
the F250 and F350 will have solid front axles.
>
>Using a rough calculation of 2500 lbs wet for the camper, and about 500
>lbs of
>tongue weight of trailer thats 3000lbs of payload. This does not yet include
>food, clothes, toys, which could easily get up to 500 additional pounds.
>
>At this point, while I'm under the the GCWR, I've exceeded the payload
>rating by
>about 1000 lbs.
>I don't believe i've exceeded the axle rating at this point for either the
>front
>or the rear axles, but I haven't done the math yet.
>
>With no options and manual transmission, the 1997 Ford tow guide rates the
>diesel F250 described above at 2500 lbs of payload. With additional factory
>options, this rating could be cut to about 2300 lbs of payload.
>
>So now we are at 1200 lbs over payload.
>
>I'm under the GCWR, and at the recommended (by rec.outdoor.rv.travel) 75%
>limit.
>Other saftey/stablity add ons will include, better shocks, airbags rear, and
>front (if necessary), and wider tires. (thanks Joe).
>
>If I replace the stock 19 gal tank with a 45 gallon tank, this adds another
>300 lbs.
>
>At this point, I will stop. On the assumption I've under the GCWR, and
>under the
>axle ratings, I will be over the payload limit by 1200 - 1500+ lbs.

We normally don't even regard GVWR, only GCWR. I've seen GVWR's exceeded
by several thousand pounds for months (in one case 2 years) without
damage and alot of offroad use. It only gets hairy when you are trying
to move and slow down large amounts of weight that aren't contained
within the wheelbase of the truck. To keep the truck from squatting too
much, I'd say the helper/air ride springs are a good idea though.

>And finally the questions... While it can be done:...
>(I'm interested in perspectives on heavy payload, vs. heavy towing
>characteristics).

>Is this rig safe at freeway speeds (no more than 70-75 on the flats)?
>6% downhill grade concerns?
>Any additional suspension mods needed?
>Would you feel safe with this rig/setup?
>
>thanks and apologies for being so anal/long-winded about this.
>
>-john

You know, I'd say that since the F350 is available, I'd go that route as
it gives you an extra margin of weight rating, as well as bigger rotors &
drums. The biggest concern would be heating up the F250 brakes and/or
excessive pad/shoe wear. The F350 can handle that better.

On the flip side, rumors are that the 1999 F350 GVWR will be upped
significantly, so that might also be true of the F250. It's all hard to
say when you are dealing only with rumors and not a true spec sheet -- my
dealer said they should see hard info trickling in between Thanksgiving &
Christmas, so maybe, if you can wait, all of your questions might be
answered.

Best Regards,
Jay

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 5 Sep 1997 13:12:26 -0600
From: Larry Smeins
Subject: RE: fordtrucks80up-digest V1 #93

> Date: Thu, 4 Sep 1997 10:53:58 -0700
> From: John Yee
> Subject: Re: F-250 Powerstroke
>
> At 01:35 PM 9/4/97 -0500, you wrote:
> >JJ,
> >
> >There are tons options available for this truck. 4.10 Gears are nice
>
> >to have, but if you want a tiny bit better mileage (1-2 mpg) get the
> >3.55 gears. The 4.10 gears are better for acceleration. The auto
> >tranny in this truck works great, but if you feel you need the
> manual,
> > it works fine, too.
> >
> >The options and packages are up to your needs. If you want a
> >luxurious truck, get it fully loaded. If you only need it bare
> bones,
> > get want you want. I find cruise control a necessity in everything.
>
> >
>
>I too am going through this.

>I'd also suggest scoping out the slide in camper, that you want
to get.
>Powerstroke's eats up about 500 lbs of payload capacity on the
1997. As >an
>example, the 1997 Ford towing guide says about 3000 lbs of
payload >(with
>2 passegers) for a 4x4 F-250 longbed with 460/manual, and about
2500 >lbs
>payload with the powerstroke. Additional options such as
automatic
>transmission, eat in to the specified payload.

>Toys, food, towable toys, etc also need to be accounted for.

>I have one friend who probably exceeds the rated payload by
about 1000 >lbs.
>While the vehicle is claimed to be fairly stable, due to
additions of good
>shocks and airbags, I do not fully understand the penalties
that would
>be involved in emegency manuvers, and longevity of drive
>train/suspension
>components.

>I'm getting the impression that many who tow a large 5th wheel
or large
>slide-in camper are either at the limit, or exceeding either
the payload >rating
>or GCRW. While some of the issues can be compensated by
>conservative/
>defensive driving habits and higher maintennance schedules; not
all >issues can.
>I'm trying to figure out what those are.

I think Ford is very conservative with their camper ratings. I
went through the calculations in Ford's camper and trailer manual for my
'95' Powerstroke 4x4 and came up with a maximum camper weight of 1500
pounds. E-gad what did I buy this big expensive truck for? I bought a
fully self contained camper, 2450 pounds wet, and when the dealer
dropped it on he commented on how little the truck dropped. He had
taken it off a 3/4 ton Chevy that needed overload springs to carry it.
This camper puts me 250 pounds over GVWR before loading gear and
passengers. I added a Hellwig rear anti-sway bar after the first year
of use, Ford didn't offer one with the PS in 95, but didn't feel I
really needed it, just thought it was a good idea. The truck carries
the camper very well and doesn't hang down in the rear like so many
trucks with big campers do. Even the biggest pop ups I looked at didn't
go over 2,000 pounds, you shouldn't have any problem carrying a pop up.

One item I would not get if I were buying another new truck is
the privacy window option. It makes my windows work like mirrors on the
inside when I have the shell on my truck, and I like to be able to see
out the rear window.

Larry
If you don't care where you are, you ain't lost.

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 05 Sep 1997 14:29:10 -0500
From: "David J. Baldwin"
Subject: Re: Sloppy Drive Train

Dennis,

This sounds really familiar, but on another vehicle. My neighbor had a
M38A1 military surplus Jeep which locked up its drivetrain and stalled
the motor, sending it sliding through an intersection with its rear end
locked.

We tore the gearbox and transfer case out. We found that the end thrust
washer on the countershaft in the transfer case had worn so thin, that
it ripped in two and was sent to the bottom of the case. Every now and
then, the output gear would snag it and jam it between the output gear
and the countershaft gear, locking the drivetrain. He was able to engage
reverse and unjam it, however. It really sounds like you have something
loose in the gearbox, and it gets picked up every now and then.

I suppose that it could be somewhere else, but usually these things bind
up everything between the wheels to the point of trouble. When you
disengage the clutch, the load from the engine side will be relieved, as
will everything between the engine and the point of trouble. Since you
still can't unjam your gearbox when the clutch is disengaged, this leads
me to suspect the gearbox.

By the way, that Jeep got fixed with a $2 washer. If you like puzzles
and have a few tools, gearboxes can be fun. Just check that you don't
need some special tools first!

Good luck! Hope this helps.


Bakend aol.com wrote:

> I have a 1987 Ranger with 2.9 efi 5spd 4X4 ext cab. No fancy tires or
> wheels just stock. I bought the truck this spring with 135K miles. I traded
> an 84 B2 in for it that never gave me any problems in over 170K. The Ranger
> is a differnt story however. On a recent trip (400 miles one way) something
> in the drive train locked up! The truck wouldn't move. I could not move the
> shifter from first gear.

- --
Best Regards,

Dave Baldwin

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 5 Sep 1997 12:04:12 -0700
From: John Yee
Subject: Re: F-250 Powerstroke

- -snip -

>Also, where did you find the info noting that the ext. cabs would be
>4-doors. I've been searching and snapping up bits of info on the new HD
>trucks, and hadn't heard that one yet. BTW, one rumor notes that both
>the F250 and F350 will have solid front axles.
>>

While I've seen it mentioned in motor trend, and 4 wheeler, the most recent is
from trailer life's web page at http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.trailerlife.com/newmodels_98ford.html

It says:

F-250, F-350
Unfortunately, the eagerly anticipated all-new HD F-250 and F-350 won't be
bowing until sometime later in the model year,
according to current industry rumors. Ford is expected to introduce its
redesigned F-350 in the spring of 1998 as an early '99
model. The new design, carrying over styling ideas from various concept
trucks, appears rounder and more "modern" than the
current version. Offered in regular and extended-cab models, the F-350 will
also continue its popular Crew Cab version.

**Also expected in the '99 model year is a four-door SuperCab model, with an
all-leather interior option and large two-element
side-view mirrors. **

The October '97 issue of Trailer Life magazine features two spy photos of
the new models.

To date, Ford had announced no major changes in its product tow ratings

- -- end of article-----

About the F250 having solid front axles...I thought I heard it on *this*
mail list. I've tried to get it verified, but have not gotten anything.
If comfort/plushness is what they are shooting for in the F250 in the above
description, a solid front axle doesn't make complete sense over the current
setup.

Be intesting to see the details, if this rumor is true.

As for other rumors, I've had 2 separate dealers in the Santa Clara, Ca. area
mention a F450 and F550, but no specifics. Their guess at a higher capacity
F series truck like the Super Duty with more capacity is all I was able
to get about a month ago.

- - more snip -

>You know, I'd say that since the F350 is available, I'd go that route as
>it gives you an extra margin of weight rating, as well as bigger rotors &
>drums. The biggest concern would be heating up the F250 brakes and/or
>excessive pad/shoe wear. The F350 can handle that better.

Thanks, I'll research the brakes on the F250-F350.
But I still got a priority to fit the truck in the garage....If the 350 fits,
that would give me a better payload margin.....


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