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80-96-list Digest Wed, 01 Nov 2000 Volume: 2000  Issue: 231

In This Issue:
Re: My Granny Tranny?
Move to Colorado (Ford Truck Recomendations)
Re: Move to Colorado (Ford Truck Recomendations)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Wed, 01 Nov 2000 16:01:03 -0800
Subject: Re: 7,000 ft - 0 - 7, 000 ft
From: Joan and Walt Posluszny <redstone home.com>

Tim,

Since you travel from 7,000 feet to O feet and since you have carburetor,
you're asking for a tall order.  I have a 1985 F-150 with 4 SP OD, 4x4 and a
351W that was ordered with the high altitude emissions package (I bought it
in Colorado).

It has a stock Motorcraft 2150 2 bbl but it is computer controlled and I
have driven it up to 14,000 feet several times and I currently live at 500
feet and I have never changed the jets.  There's a feedback solenoid on the
back of the carb that bleeds in extra air as you go up in elevation.  It
doesn't backfire and it doesn't spew unburned fuel.  In fact it runs just
fine, sure it looses some power the higher you go but that's normal.  It is
totally stock except for a hot Jacobs ignition system I installed in 1986.
The accelerator pump also adjusts the amount of fuel sprayed into the carb
as well, but that's it.  It's not really that complicated compared to a
plain jane 2150 2 bbl.

Even with a non-altitude adjusting carb, it sounds like you may need a carb
rebuild, check the operation of the choke pull off, float level, etc....

Walt

> From: "Tim Clevenger" <tclevenger hotmail.com>
> Subject: High altitude
> Date: Tue, 31 Oct 2000 08:35:41 PST
>
> Hi all,
>
> Is there something I can do to make my truck run better at altitude?  I live
> at about 7,000 feet altitude, and my truck spews out unburned fuel, runs
> very rough in cold weather and backfires when coasting downhill.  (Boy, THAT
> wakes the neighbors!)  I work at about sea level, so I can't permanently
> rejet for high-altitude driving without leaning out at sea level.  I heard
> that there was some kind of altitude compensator, either lever-operated or
> automatic, that can be fitted to my carb.  Any ideas?
>
> Thanks.
>
> Tim Clevenger
> '85 F-250 460 T-19
> __________________________


------------------------------

From: b-khanson juno.com
Date: Wed, 1 Nov 2000 19:18:40 -0600
Subject: Re: My Granny Tranny?

> From: "Michael Leonard" <lavidapaz hotmail.com>

> I've got a 1986 F150 EFI 5.0L 4x2.  The last time I took
> it on the freeway I experienced two bad things: 1) I could
> only reach a maximum speed of 55 mph and 2) my transimission
> doesn't respond to shifting between "drive" and "overdrive" -
> it's as though I hadn't shifted at all. The truck also now has very
> low overall power, even at lower speeds.

These are classic symptoms of a timing chain that's jumped one
tooth.  If so, the truck will have a dead smooth idle but no power.

Put a timing light on it and see if the marks are WAY off.  This
would confirm the jumped chain.

BTW, if it's jumped one tooth, it WILL jump a second...and you
won't be able to start it.  (Don't ask me how I know!)  Also,
engines are most apt to jump a tooth on start-up.

Bruce Hanson
Apple Valley, MN

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 2 Nov 2000 05:23:21 -0800 (PST)
From: Paul Rozell <prozell yahoo.com>
Subject: Move to Colorado (Ford Truck Recomendations)

To the awesome Brain trust of the lists ;),
A little background before the questions. I currently live in Oklahoma which is not known for Snow
or other cold weather anomalies that much of the northern part of the country experiences, and now
I am moving to Colorado for a new job. My question to the list is this, is a 4x4 truck a necessity
in Colorado?!?!? Would a Dually handle the snow very well?? are there any other suggestions that
anyone on the list could give to help me prepare for the transition between a very mild climate to
one that tends to be a little colder?!?!?!

Any tips and or help is highly appreciated.

Sincerely,
Paul
65 F100 460 C6
96 F150 5.0 (not 4 wheel, might sell)

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From homework help to love advice, Yahoo! Experts has your answer.
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------------------------------

From: "Atkinson, Chip" <CAtkinson Circadence.com>
Subject: Re: Move to Colorado (Ford Truck Recomendations)
Date: Thu, 2 Nov 2000 09:45:42 -0700

Where in Colorado are you moving?  That makes a tremendous difference.  If
you are moving to the Denver area you don't really have to worry about a 4x4
unless you are a snowplow driver or something where you _must_ get there on
time regardless.  I've been in Boulder since '78 and have done great with
2wd vehicles, and for several years recently, a 2wd '79 toyota pickup and
done relatively ok.

The Denverish area (Ft. Collins to Castle Rock) doesn't live up to its snowy
reputation.  What happens is that we get a few big dumps, but they are
pretty dry snow and just about as soon as it stops snowing, the sun comes
out and melts the roads clean.  Also, keep in mind that the climate is
pretty dry here, meaning that we don't get all that much snow in the first
place.  Ok, maybe more than OK, but since it melts off so fast you don't
have to deal with it all that much.  Another thing to consider is that with
4wd, you can get yourself into trouble faster.

I can't comment about other locations in Colorado, and if you are living in
the mountains, 4x4 will be a necessity.

I'd only get duals if you need them for some other reason.  You can get a
set of chains for less and be way ahead on the traction scene.  You can also
take chains off when you are done with them.

Hope all those ramblings help a tiny bit.

Chip

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Paul Rozell [mailto:prozell yahoo.com]
> Sent: Thursday, November 02, 2000 6:23 AM
> To: 61-79-list ford-trucks.com; 80-96-list ford-trucks.com
> Subject: [80-96-list] Move to Colorado (Ford Truck Recomendations)
>
>
> To the awesome Brain trust of the lists ;),
> A little background before the questions. I currently live in
> Oklahoma which is not known for Snow
> or other cold weather anomalies that much of the northern
> part of the country experiences, and now
> I am moving to Colorado for a new job. My question to the
> list is this, is a 4x4 truck a necessity
> in Colorado?!?!? Would a Dually handle the snow very well??
> are there any other suggestions that
> anyone on the list could give to help me prepare for the
> transition between a very mild climate to
> one that tends to be a little colder?!?!?!
>
> Any tips and or help is highly appreciated.
>
> Sincerely,
> Paul
> 65 F100 460 C6
> 96 F150 5.0 (not 4 wheel, might sell)
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> From homework help to love advice, Yahoo! Experts has your answer.
> http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://experts.yahoo.com/
> =============================================================
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------------------------------

End of 80-96-list Digest V2000 #231
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