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Subject: 80-96-list-digest V3 #266
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80-96-list-digest Wednesday, September 22 1999 Volume 03 : Number 266



=======================================================================
Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1980-1996 Trucks and Vans
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In this issue:

Re: FTE 80-96 - Re:
FTE 80-96 - Re: FTE 80-96 9 inch
Re: FTE 80-96 - Rivets Vs Bolts
FTE 80-96 - water leak under the cowl
FTE 80-96 - Fan Clutch Noise?
Re: FTE 80-96 - RE: Squeaky door panels
FTE 80-96 - Re: Shift Kits
FTE 80-96 - Re: 95 pwr-stroke & E4OD questions
FTE 80-96 - Re: - idle lope
FTE 80-96 - Re: engine noise during strain
RE: FTE 80-96 - Rivets Vs Bolts
FTE 80-96 - vibration
Re: FTE 80-96 - Re: Shift Kits
RE: FTE 80-96 - vibration
RE: FTE 80-96 - Rivets Vs Bolts
Re: FTE 80-96 - Re: Shift Kits
FTE 80-96 - Another weak component in my truck ?!?!
Re: FTE 80-96 - Another weak component in my truck ?!?!
FTE 80-96 - Off axles and rivets.
Re: FTE 80-96 - vibration
FTE 80-96 - 1990 F-150 tansmission/rear end
Re: FTE 80-96 - 1990 F-150 tansmission/rear end
Re: FTE 80-96 - Another weak component in my truck ?!?!

=======================================================================

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Wed, 22 Sep 1999 06:56:06 EDT
From: FLR150 aol.com
Subject: Re: FTE 80-96 - Re:

In a message dated 9/22/99 1:22:13 AM Eastern Daylight Time, rspasoje gte.net
writes:


lockers in our 8.8"s doing the Rubicon and we had no problems whatsoever.
It takes alot of money to make a 9" significantly stronger than an 8.8"
IMHO. I have seen people run 35" and 36" tires HARD with an 8.8" rear end
with no failures yet.

Rade >>
On the 8.8 issue, this specific rear is VERY strong. From a racing point of
view, I have friends with Mustangs that are running consistent 10 second 1/4
mile times, leaving at 4k+ rpms, and have been doing so for years on the same
8.8 rear gear set. I personally have the stock 8.8 rear gear set in
mine(pegleg open at that), and have run as fast as 14.9 in the 1/4, and race
it often in a 5100 LB Flareside extended cab.
Later
Wayne Foy
'94 Flareside SC
290 rwhp, 8.8 rear
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------------------------------

Date: Wed, 22 Sep 1999 08:22:22 -0400
From: "Matt Fitzsimmons"
Subject: FTE 80-96 - Re: FTE 80-96 9 inch

We bolted one in from an '82. Went right in, the brake line and the
companion flange were both different, so we had to change the flex line and
the rear U-joint.

The 8.8 is hardly marginal. We have one in a 351 twin turbo powered T'bird,
it has yet to give any problems. We've also had them in Mustangs with 302s
and blowers. While most people don't really work their F150s these days,
it's very seldom I hear of 8.8 problems ( most are looking for other gears
or limited slip )


- ----- Original Message -----
From: ken haley
To:
Sent: Tuesday, September 21, 1999 11:33 PM


> I have an 83 Bronco, 302, 4speed OD. The rear axle is trashed. Since the
8.8
> is marginal even in lightweight Mustangs, I'd prefer to install a 9 inch.
> Which F150 9 inch rear axles will bolt in? Anyone know sure?
>
> ______________________________________________________
> > == FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

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------------------------------

Date: Wed, 22 Sep 1999 08:46:20 -0400
From: "Matt Fitzsimmons"
Subject: Re: FTE 80-96 - Rivets Vs Bolts

I used to work at the Ford truck assembly plant in Oakville Ontario.

I watched as the front ends of the frames were riveted together. It's much
more expensive to install a rivet than a bolt. The riveting presses are
large hydraulic units suspended by chains that have to be man handled into
position by the operator. There are both rivets and bolts used. The bolts
are used if a riveting gun cannot get into the required position, or (most
commonly) there are options on other trucks that bolt up to the same
mounting point. ( We made trucks for all over the world, the variations of
options is amazing ) Rivets are used because the hold better, and will
never back out. During assembly all the rivets and bolts are placed into
the holes, the nuts on the bolts ( if any ) are snugged down, the rivets are
pressed, then the bolts are torqued. As the rivets are compressed their
diameters increase to fill the holes, overall it makes for a very tight
connection. Field replacement units always use bolts as it would be just
about impossible to get press in to install new rivets. When installing
bolts in place of rivets, get the largest bolt that will fit the hole. Some
of the holes are odd sizes, so you might have to ream out a hole slightly to
get up to the next size bolt. Do one hole at a time, it makes the alignment
easier. Use grade 10 if you can find them, they should be fine thread, have
thread locking compound, and thread locking nuts ( just like the ones that
come with lift kits ). Torque the bolts to spec. not too tight either.
- ----- Original Message -----
From: les williams
To:
Sent: Wednesday, September 22, 1999 5:48 AM
Subject: Re: FTE 80-96 - Rivets Vs Bolts


>
> Hi Eric and everyone else,
>
> I'm as cynical as the next person when it comes to costs and auto
> manufacturing. I believe that rivets are used because:
> 1. Their Cheap
> 2. Don't cost much
> 3. Easy to manufacture & install - ease of repair does not come into
> Fords cost equation.
> If it's a paid job, and the customer doesn't care, know, hasn't got the
> money, just do the bushes, drilling out and replacing the rivets is going
to
> take more than 35-40 mins. to do it properly. If your doing the job on you
> truck, in your good time, then the above doesn't apply.
> I would love to see the sequence of events of a F series chassis being
> manufactured. It would probably explain why the radius chassis support as
> both rivets and bolts used. ( Hint: maybe someone on this list ? done the
> tourist thing ? thru the factory ? )
> My opinion is to replace the rivets with minimum grade 8 High Tensile
> bolts & nuts. Use a drill size that makes the bolt body (not the thread )
a
> nylon/copper hammer tap in fit so it's not just relying on just the torque
> of the nut to prevent movement. NOT that 3/4" drill you only used once for
a
> hole in the firewall. At least nuts & bolts can be tightened and checked,
> not so with rivets. Trust in whatever god you believe in, and eyeball
rivets
> for that tell tail rust stain that indicates chassis/rivet movement, and
> I'm sure you don't have to be told how much an F chassis twists in just
> normal road use.
> Down here in Oz where a lot of F's have Roo Bars fitted, just watch
the
> hood rock & roll one way and the 'Bar twist the opposite direction driving
> over gutters, speed bumps, (Korean manufactured 2 door cars) etc.
Scarrry!!!
>
> The other one of many reasons for my cynicism, is that for close to 30
> years the Ford Falcon car has three rivets holding the front top ball
joint
> to the top arm, and for close to 30 years Ford insisted in riveting those
> suckers in from new. The replacement joint Both Ford & OEM, comes with 3
> bolts & nuts. So for close on 30 years mechanics have devised ways and
means
> of cutting out those rivets, and bolting in the replacement. Suprise,
> suprise, that's at the owners expense. No case has been made by Ford or
> Transport agencies of the superiority of Bolts V's Rivets. If a case for
> replacing the arm could be proven, Ford would be very happy, I'm sure, to
> sell a $150 part over a $30 bolt in balljoint. I would much prefer to be
in
> a truck and drop the radius rod Chassis mount than in a car and drop the
top
> balljoint!!
> In normal sane sensible usage, if it's of any consolation, serious
front
> end parts failure usually happen at parking speeds, often with hard lock
to
> lock steering wheel movements involved, not, as most expect, at highway
> speeds - but there are always exceptions.....St Christopher, don't leave
me
> ...........now I'll probably get a pile of emails telling me how people
have
> managed to drop and run over their own front axle at 70 MPH ......ouch!!
>
> Don't get me wrong and think I'm just dumping on Ford - I own three
Ford
> products! So I have paid for the right to criticize. There - that's my
> 2cents or 50c in OZ Dollars worth .....
>
> Regards
>
> Les
> Lost In The Land Of OZ
>
> Falcon GT, Fairlane, & '86 F100 351 clevo LPG, MSD firing a .060 plug
gap,
> 2WD,C6, 9" rear end, & I'm having Fun..
>
>
> Eric Sneed wrote:
>
> > >From the many posts that I have read on this list it seemed as if
> > removing the rivets would be a lot easier than trying to move the axles
> > forward, but now I don't know what to do. If I were to get a lift
> > installed and had extended radius arms installed wouldn't they use
> > bolts? I am not doubting what you have said, I am just more confused on
> > this issue than before. I want to do the job right the first time, so I
> > don't have to keep repairing the same issue again and again.
> >
> > Thanks
> >
> > Eric
> >
> >
>
> == FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

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------------------------------

Date: Wed, 22 Sep 1999 09:13:35 -0400
From: John Wickerham
Subject: FTE 80-96 - water leak under the cowl

I haven't posted much to the list - but I've got this same problem with
my '86 F150 4x4. Whenever it rains, water leaks in under the dash. The
water hose method indicates that the leak is probably along a seam at the
firewall that is under the cowl. This is a caulked seam.

I was able to remove my cowl without removing the hood, though it's a bit
of a chore.

If you loosen but don't remove the hood bolts, it will allow the hood to
move up slightly (while open) in front of the cowl. This gives you just
enough room to work the cowl out of it's position and remove it (after
removing all those screws). You have to be careful not to bend it.

I have not found the exact place of the leak yet, but this is my next
priority. If you have any more info to share in fixing yours, please
post it, and I will do the same. This leak has caused lots of rust
over the years in my truck at least, and I want to fix it before
winter.

Later,
John

>Date: Tue, 21 Sep 1999 21:37:46 -0700
>From: "J.S.H."
>Subject: FTE 80-96 - Cowl removal
>
>>With a hose I found it's not the windshield, but instead something >under
the cowl grill. I know there are drains in there, which seem to >be working.
>
>>I'm going to pull the wiper blades, remove the grill, and poke around. >I'd
>>appreciate any advice on whether there's an obvious place to look for
>>problem.
>
>Can't help you with the leak but I recently did a wiper nmotor on my 84.
>Had to unbolt the rear most hinges on the hood and lay the hood forward
>to get the cowl off.No big deal but not a one man job.
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------------------------------

Date: Wed, 22 Sep 1999 09:27:25 EST
From: "James"
Subject: FTE 80-96 - Fan Clutch Noise?

Hello All,

I have a 1989 F150 with a 300 I6 and Mazda 5 speed. Lately I've
noticed that when I first crank up the truck and start driving, it
makes a scraping sound like the fan is hitting the plastic fan
shroud, but there is no evidence that the fan is actually contacting
the shroud. The noise is intermittent and is worse when I hit bumps
in the road and it goes away after a few minutes of driving after
the engine warms up.

My guess is that the fan clutch is going bad. Anybody got any
other ideas?

Thanks,
James Hiers



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------------------------------

Date: Wed, 22 Sep 1999 06:31:38 PDT
From: "Roger Lane"
Subject: Re: FTE 80-96 - RE: Squeaky door panels

On Tue, 21 Sep 1999 22:42:28 -0500, Jim Cannon wrote:

> At 22:13 21/09/99 -0500, you wrote:
> >
> >And to Roy H., It is so fine to walk out of the house and not be
sweating
> >before I get in the truck!
> >
> >Dave H.
> >Houston, TX
> >'92 F-150 Mine
>
> I had to grab a sweater the other morning because it was down to 65
degrees!
>
> The truck loved it!
>
>
> Jim Cannon
> Houston, TX
> '29 Ford Model A Phaeton '63 Buick Riviera 401 V-8
> '80 Ford F-150 300 I-6 2WD
> == FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

You guy's want to send some of that heat up here. Yesterday morning we had
a record low of 29 degrees!!! Man I just LOVE Iowa!!!

Roger Lane

"Never argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level
then beat you with experience."




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------------------------------

Date: Wed, 22 Sep 1999 10:39:11 -0500
From: "DannyF"
Subject: FTE 80-96 - Re: Shift Kits

> ate: Tue, 21 Sep 1999 07:29:30 EDT
> From: FLR150 aol.com
> Subject: FTE 80-96 - Shift Kits
>
>
> area and I've seen a shift controller (in Jegs) that goes inline on the
> wiring harness allowing you to change firmness on the fly. Has anyone had
> any experience with this thing?>>
> Gang,

> Any shift kit which electronically controls the shifting may or may not
> harm
> the tranny. All these things do is to up the line pressure in the tranny
> to
> cause the shifts to be firmer, hence making you feel performance. I have
> seen
> more often than not that these shift improvers cause internal component
> damage to the electronically shifted trannies. By the way, the 1990 models
> came with the AOD, not the AODE so the plug in kit wont work. Check out
> level10.com, artcarr.com, or any other tranny company. They all have valve
> body kits for the AOD.
> Later
> Wayne Foy
> '94 Flareside SC

Not quite Wayne. In 1990 you could have a AOD, E4OD or even a
C6(rare though in that year). Theres no such thing as a AODE. My
manual tells me the AOD was not offered in the 4X4.

Anyway, the axle code is on the driver's side door post. An E
designates the E4OD. This will get you the OD button on the
dashboard. Or just look at the trans pan. If theres a big T portrusion
out of the pan, its the E4OD.

And yes, the early E4OD were prone to lubrication problems all the
way into the early '90s. Any modern rebuild kit will fix them. When
Ford corrected I don't know. Theres no way to tell externally if the
trans includes this update.


Danny
danf01 worldnet.att.net
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------------------------------

Date: Wed, 22 Sep 1999 10:39:11 -0500
From: "DannyF"
Subject: FTE 80-96 - Re: 95 pwr-stroke & E4OD questions

>
> I've heard that the E4OD transmission as used in my 95 F-350 with the
> power-stroke diesel was not very reliable early on, but was modified in
> later
> applications to overcome the problem -- whatever it was. I've got nearly
> 100k miles on mine without any sign of a problem. I'd like to know how to
> tell if mine is a "before" or "after" version -- the truck was built in
> 9/94.
> Also considering installing the Banks PowerPack -- anyone have any
> direct
> experience with it? And, what is the concensus on power-stroke longevity?
> Thanks.

All the farmers/ranchers/equip haulers around here seem to love
them. They say that Dodge/Chev has nothing to compare for raw
torque.

Longevity? Can't say as they are too new. Only examples I have
are friends w/100K...no big problems so far.

I cringed when I first saw the E4OD hooked up to a PowerStroke.
But my friends are doing OK. But I've heard of others having
problems w/this combo. I don't know if Ford corrected the problems
on the E4OD by 1995.


Danny
danf01 worldnet.att.net
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------------------------------

Date: Wed, 22 Sep 1999 10:39:11 -0500
From: "DannyF"
Subject: FTE 80-96 - Re: - idle lope

> Date: Tue, 21 Sep 1999 07:51:26 -0700
> From: "Dennis"
> Subject: FTE 80-96 - idle lope
>
> Recently purchased a 1989 F250 4x4 XLT lariat extended cab truck. Has FI
> 351W and 3 speed automatic, and 66,000 miles.
> The truck runs great except at an idle. Seems to have a hard time
> finding
> its rythym, in other words the idle speed goes up and down until you rev
> it
> just right then it will smoothout. It also feels like it is missing at
> an
> idle when it is not loping, any ideas? I have replaced the plug wires,
> plugs, cap, rotor, fuel filter, cleaned the pcv. Also i noticed the
> condensor(what is the purpose on elec. ign.) wire is broken.
> Hand held code scanner returns a 33, apparently indicating egr problems,
> sensor checks out OK.
>
> Dennis

The condensor is for radio noise suppression only.

Checking the EGR on these engines is more involved than just
testing for vacuum at the valve or just opening it at idle and waiting
for the engine to stall.

The EGR controller can be faulty, you can have vacuum leaks and
as another poster mentioned, you can have coked up EGR
passages. Try cleaning the valve and the pipe first. Will cost you
an EGR gasket.
Danny
danf01 worldnet.att.net
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------------------------------

Date: Wed, 22 Sep 1999 10:39:11 -0500
From: "DannyF"
Subject: FTE 80-96 - Re: engine noise during strain

> Date: Tue, 21 Sep 1999 11:26:02 -0400 (EDT)
> From: Victor L Moran
> Subject: FTE 80-96 - engine noise during strain
>
> When I am climbing up a hill or quickly accelerating in my 87 aerostar,
> I
> am hearing a noise that I've heard from old car engines before. It
> sounds
> like something is loose and rattling inside the engine itself. It only
> happens when I am putting strain on the engine.
> For example I was climbing a hill in NJ on monday at 65. When I heard
> the
> noise, I slowed to 55 and came out of overdrive. Then the noise was
> gone.
> During the same trip I heard the noise a couple of times when I
> accelerated quickly.
> Is this the famous 'lifter noise' that I hear so much about?
>
> And more importantly, how do I fix it?
>
> This is the 3 liter v-6 engine.

Age old problem w/many vehicles. Best to focus on EGR operation
and check timing, run some Techron in the tank twice.

The easy fix is to move up one grade on gas.
Danny
danf01 worldnet.att.net
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------------------------------

Date: Wed, 22 Sep 1999 09:03:05 -0700
From: Eric Sneed
Subject: RE: FTE 80-96 - Rivets Vs Bolts

Les And Matt, Thanks for all the great info! I will be using the rivet
removal method for replacing my radius arm bushings. What would be the
correct torque specs for these bolts that will be replacing the rivets?

Thanks Again Guys
Eric

-----Original Message-----
From: Matt Fitzsimmons [SMTP:mattfitz idirect.com]
Sent: Wednesday, September 22, 1999 5:46 AM
To: 80-96-list ford-trucks.com
Subject: Re: FTE 80-96 - Rivets Vs Bolts

I used to work at the Ford truck assembly plant in Oakville
Ontario.

I watched as the front ends of the frames were riveted together.
It's much
more expensive to install a rivet than a bolt. The riveting
presses are
large hydraulic units suspended by chains that have to be man
handled into
position by the operator. There are both rivets and bolts used.
The bolts
are used if a riveting gun cannot get into the required
position, or (most
commonly) there are options on other trucks that bolt up to the
same
mounting point. ( We made trucks for all over the world, the
variations of
options is amazing ) Rivets are used because the hold better,
and will
never back out. During assembly all the rivets and bolts are
placed into
the holes, the nuts on the bolts ( if any ) are snugged down,
the rivets are
pressed, then the bolts are torqued. As the rivets are
compressed their
diameters increase to fill the holes, overall it makes for a
very tight
connection. Field replacement units always use bolts as it
would be just
about impossible to get press in to install new rivets. When
installing
bolts in place of rivets, get the largest bolt that will fit the
hole. Some
of the holes are odd sizes, so you might have to ream out a hole
slightly to
get up to the next size bolt. Do one hole at a time, it makes
the alignment
easier. Use grade 10 if you can find them, they should be fine
thread, have
thread locking compound, and thread locking nuts ( just like
the ones that
come with lift kits ). Torque the bolts to spec. not too tight
either.
----- Original Message -----
From: les williams
To:
Sent: Wednesday, September 22, 1999 5:48 AM
Subject: Re: FTE 80-96 - Rivets Vs Bolts


>
> Hi Eric and everyone else,
>
> I'm as cynical as the next person when it comes to costs
and auto
> manufacturing. I believe that rivets are used because:
> 1. Their Cheap
> 2. Don't cost much
> 3. Easy to manufacture & install - ease of repair does not
come into
> Fords cost equation.
> If it's a paid job, and the customer doesn't care, know,
hasn't got the
> money, just do the bushes, drilling out and replacing the
rivets is going
to
> take more than 35-40 mins. to do it properly. If your doing
the job on you
> truck, in your good time, then the above doesn't apply.
> I would love to see the sequence of events of a F series
chassis being
> manufactured. It would probably explain why the radius chassis
support as
> both rivets and bolts used. ( Hint: maybe someone on this list
? done the
> tourist thing ? thru the factory ? )
> My opinion is to replace the rivets with minimum grade 8
High Tensile
> bolts & nuts. Use a drill size that makes the bolt body (not
the thread )
a
> nylon/copper hammer tap in fit so it's not just relying on
just the torque
> of the nut to prevent movement. NOT that 3/4" drill you only
used once for
a
> hole in the firewall. At least nuts & bolts can be tightened
and checked,
> not so with rivets. Trust in whatever god you believe in, and
eyeball
rivets
> for that tell tail rust stain that indicates chassis/rivet
movement, and
> I'm sure you don't have to be told how much an F chassis
twists in just
> normal road use.
> Down here in Oz where a lot of F's have Roo Bars fitted,
just watch
the
> hood rock & roll one way and the 'Bar twist the opposite
direction driving
> over gutters, speed bumps, (Korean manufactured 2 door cars)
etc.
Scarrry!!!
>
> The other one of many reasons for my cynicism, is that for
close to 30
> years the Ford Falcon car has three rivets holding the front
top ball
joint
> to the top arm, and for close to 30 years Ford insisted in
riveting those
> suckers in from new. The replacement joint Both Ford & OEM,
comes with 3
> bolts & nuts. So for close on 30 years mechanics have devised
ways and
means
> of cutting out those rivets, and bolting in the replacement.
Suprise,
> suprise, that's at the owners expense. No case has been made
by Ford or
> Transport agencies of the superiority of Bolts V's Rivets. If
a case for
> replacing the arm could be proven, Ford would be very happy,
I'm sure, to
> sell a $150 part over a $30 bolt in balljoint. I would much
prefer to be
in
> a truck and drop the radius rod Chassis mount than in a car
and drop the
top
> balljoint!!
> In normal sane sensible usage, if it's of any consolation,
serious
front
> end parts failure usually happen at parking speeds, often with
hard lock
to
> lock steering wheel movements involved, not, as most expect,
at highway
> speeds - but there are always exceptions.....St Christopher,
don't leave
me
> ...........now I'll probably get a pile of emails telling me
how people
have
> managed to drop and run over their own front axle at 70 MPH
......ouch!!
>
> Don't get me wrong and think I'm just dumping on Ford - I
own three
Ford
> products! So I have paid for the right to criticize. There -
that's my
> 2cents or 50c in OZ Dollars worth .....
>
> Regards
>
> Les
> Lost In The Land Of OZ
>
> Falcon GT, Fairlane, & '86 F100 351 clevo LPG, MSD firing a
.060 plug
gap,
> 2WD,C6, 9" rear end, & I'm having Fun..
>
>
> Eric Sneed wrote:
>
> > >From the many posts that I have read on this list it seemed
as if
> > removing the rivets would be a lot easier than trying to
move the axles
> > forward, but now I don't know what to do. If I were to get a
lift
> > installed and had extended radius arms installed wouldn't
they use
> > bolts? I am not doubting what you have said, I am just more
confused on
> > this issue than before. I want to do the job right the first
time, so I
> > don't have to keep repairing the same issue again and again.
> >
> > Thanks
> >
> > Eric
> >
> >
>
> == FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info
http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

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------------------------------

Date: Wed, 22 Sep 1999 09:15:13 PDT
From: "Michael Surette"
Subject: FTE 80-96 - vibration

Dave,

I have a 302 with E4OD transmission. The drivetrain has just under 50,000
miles on it. The vibration seems to get worse in cooler weather. If it
happens to be as serious as a transmission rebuild, I would prefer to just
swap the auto for a 5-speed manual. Does anyone know if that is a
straightforward swap or if it will cause problems and cost an arm and a leg?

Mike
Abingdon, MD

Date: Tue, 21 Sep 1999 15:27:41 -0400
From: Dave Heverin Subject: FTE 80-96 - RE:Mike,

Which engine/transmission combination do you have? How many miles do you
have on the drive train. On my 88' F150 with an AOD4 transmission I had a
similar problem. The fix was a transmission rebuild.

Dave
Bel Air, MD

- - -----Original Message-----
From: Michael Surette [mailto:budsurette hotmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, September 21, 1999 2:46 PMTo:
80-96-list ford-trucks.comSubject:

Fellow list members,

I have a 1996 F-150 Eddie Bauer Edition truck, 4x4, automatic, K&N
airfilter.

3. I also get a vibration when my truck wants to get into a higher gear.
Adding a little gas makes the vibration worse. I have to almost floor it to
upshift to the next gear and make the vibration go away. Engine mounts are
ok. Dealer says the transmission is also ok. Has anyone had the
sameproblem?

Mike
Abingdon, MD

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Date: Wed, 22 Sep 1999 09:38:29 -0700
From: Bob Kennedy
Subject: Re: FTE 80-96 - Re: Shift Kits

DannyF wrote:

>
> Not quite Wayne. In 1990 you could have a AOD, E4OD or even a
> C6(rare though in that year). Theres no such thing as a AODE. My
> manual tells me the AOD was not offered in the 4X4.
>
> Anyway, the axle code is on the driver's side door post. An E
> designates the E4OD. This will get you the OD button on the
> dashboard. Or just look at the trans pan. If theres a big T portrusion
> out of the pan, its the E4OD.
>
> And yes, the early E4OD were prone to lubrication problems all the
> way into the early '90s. Any modern rebuild kit will fix them. When
> Ford corrected I don't know. Theres no way to tell externally if the
> trans includes this update.
>
> Danny
> danf01 worldnet.att.net
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Yo Danny,
Ford did make an AODE as well as the others you listed. Check out,
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.baumannengineering.com

They have an interesting history on Ford Transmissions as well as upgrade
possibilities. I've actually printed this out and keep it in a binder.

Bob


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Date: Wed, 22 Sep 1999 13:15:05 -0400
From: Dave Heverin
Subject: RE: FTE 80-96 - vibration

Mike,

At 50,000 miles the drive train should still be under warranty from FORD. I
had a 5year/60,000 mile warranty on all drivetrain components. You may want
to contact your favorite Ford dealer.

I had a short block replacement at 70,000 miles on my 302. Ford's mistake.
They had a run of problems with 302 and 460 blocks that would cause the
engines to develop piston slap. Even though I was outside of my warranty
period they did the work at no charge. The transmission (120,000miles)
started showing symptoms you describe plus not wanting to shift out of
overdrive when I slowed down. I had the rebuild done at Bill & Earl's in
Baltimore. It was definitely needed. They replaced all of the clutches and
the torque converter, plus they installed a retrofit shift valve from Ford
to correct some shifting problems in the AOD transmission.

Dave
88' F150, 302/AOD
Bel Air, MD.



- -----Original Message-----
From: Michael Surette [mailto:budsurette hotmail.com]
Sent: Wednesday, September 22, 1999 12:15 PM
To: 80-96-list ford-trucks.com
Subject: FTE 80-96 - vibration


Dave,

I have a 302 with E4OD transmission. The drivetrain has just under 50,000
miles on it. The vibration seems to get worse in cooler weather. If it
happens to be as serious as a transmission rebuild, I would prefer to just
swap the auto for a 5-speed manual. Does anyone know if that is a
straightforward swap or if it will cause problems and cost an arm and a leg?

Mike
Abingdon, MD

Date: Tue, 21 Sep 1999 15:27:41 -0400
From: Dave Heverin Subject: FTE 80-96 - RE:Mike,

Which engine/transmission combination do you have? How many miles do you
have on the drive train. On my 88' F150 with an AOD4 transmission I had a
similar problem. The fix was a transmission rebuild.

Dave
Bel Air, MD

- - -----Original Message-----
From: Michael Surette [mailto:budsurette hotmail.com]
Sent: Tuesday, September 21, 1999 2:46 PMTo:
80-96-list ford-trucks.comSubject:

Fellow list members,

I have a 1996 F-150 Eddie Bauer Edition truck, 4x4, automatic, K&N
airfilter.

3. I also get a vibration when my truck wants to get into a higher gear.
Adding a little gas makes the vibration worse. I have to almost floor it to

upshift to the next gear and make the vibration go away. Engine mounts are
ok. Dealer says the transmission is also ok. Has anyone had the
sameproblem?

Mike
Abingdon, MD

______________________________________________________
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Date: Wed, 22 Sep 1999 11:17:54 -0600
From: "Giddens, Scott"
Subject: RE: FTE 80-96 - Rivets Vs Bolts

You are correct, rivets are used to hold parts as if they were made of one
piece. Welding may weaken the temper of the steel alloy unless the assembly
allows for the parts to be re-tempered to the required hardness.
Re-tempering requires heating the parts up in a furnace and this may not be
practical when lubricants are present or parts are very large.

Rivets are used to insure parts don't move in relation to each other, just
like welding. They also require less labor to install and possibly less
inspection as well as not requiring a torque procedure. It may seem on the
outside that rivets are more expensive but look at the price of each rivet
as compared to a nut/bolt, the cost of labor, and the elimination of a
torque spec. You will find rivets used where ever it is less likely to
require removal to some degree, it is a judgement call for the engineering
team to decide the requirement for cost, producibility, stiffness,
likelihood of removal, and servicing. None of these decisions are made
without careful consideration and a good balance of each of these.

Bolts require larger over-sized holes than the rivets do to allow for
tolerance to insure parts fit together. Usually parts are match drilled
before they are riveted, but since I don't work in the automobile industry
it is possible that the holes are pre-drilled and the hole mismatch is
filled with rivet material when they expand. If you use a bolt in place of a
rivet there is a slight chance the bolt will not fit so your suggestion of
drilling the hole out to the next size with a very tight fit with a bolt is
a must. These parts are under high loads/shock and slippage of a bolt will
eventually cause problems.

The only recommendation I would add to this is to remove the rivets one at a
time, open up the hole by drilling out BOTH parts at the same time with a
slightly larger drill bit and insert very close fitting bolts into each one
before proceeding to the next hole. This is called "match drilling" so the
parts will be in perfect alignment. There are available bolts that are
slightly larger on the shank than the threads, these are called "close
tolerance bolts". The unthreaded portion (shank or grip area) of the bolt is
better to hold loads than the threaded portion is. This is called the grip
length. A close fit fastener like this should not use the threads to handle
shear loads and bolts with a grip length are a must for this type of
application.

Another alternative is to use pins in addition to the bolts. This should be
done only when it is impossible to use close tolerance bolts. The pins are
installed into holes slightly smaller than the pin thus creating an
interference fit. The difficult part is to retain the pin so it does not
come out. You should use as many pins as there are bolts and they should be
located beside each bolt but not too close.

Scott

- -----Original Message-----
From: Matt Fitzsimmons [SMTP:mattfitz idirect.com]
Sent: Wednesday, September 22, 1999 6:46 AM
To: 80-96-list ford-trucks.com
Subject: Re: FTE 80-96 - Rivets Vs Bolts

I used to work at the Ford truck assembly plant in Oakville Ontario.

I watched as the front ends of the frames were riveted together. It's much
more expensive to install a rivet than a bolt. The riveting presses are
large hydraulic units suspended by chains that have to be man handled into
position by the operator. There are both rivets and bolts used. The bolts
are used if a riveting gun cannot get into the required position, or (most
commonly) there are options on other trucks that bolt up to the same
mounting point. ( We made trucks for all over the world, the variations of
options is amazing ) Rivets are used because the hold better, and will
never back out. During assembly all the rivets and bolts are placed into
the holes, the nuts on the bolts ( if any ) are snugged down, the rivets are
pressed, then the bolts are torqued. As the rivets are compressed their
diameters increase to fill the holes, overall it makes for a very tight
connection. Field replacement units always use bolts as it would be just
about impossible to get press in to install new rivets. When installing
bolts in place of rivets, get the largest bolt that will fit the hole. Some
of the holes are odd sizes, so you might have to ream out a hole slightly to
get up to the next size bolt. Do one hole at a time, it makes the alignment
easier. Use grade 10 if you can find them, they should be fine thread, have
thread locking compound, and thread locking nuts ( just like the ones that
come with lift kits ). Torque the bolts to spec. not too tight either.

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Date: Wed, 22 Sep 1999 14:55:00 EDT
From: FLR150 aol.com
Subject: Re: FTE 80-96 - Re: Shift Kits

In a message dated 9/22/99 12:08:22 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
danf01 worldnet.att.net writes:

>
Danny,
I hate to tell you pal but you are sadly mistaken. I have an AODE in my
truck. It is actually the AODE/4R70W, differing from the AODE in that it has
the lower ratio first gear. And you must not be a big fan of 94-96 Mustangs
then. All the V-8 powered stangs with an automatic got an AODE, plus the
Lincoln Mark VII and Mark VIII. Also check
HREF="http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.baumannengineering.com/">Automatic + Electronic = Baumann
Engineering: Electromatic Performance f, Art
Carr, and email these experts in transmission modification, ESPECIALLY
ART CARR whose Rough Riders off road team has won many street class off road
events using AODE powered Ford trucks. Check your info.....
Later
Wayne Foy
'94 Flareside SC
5.0/AODE powered
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Date: Wed, 22 Sep 1999 14:16:31 -0600
From: Fred Moreno
Subject: FTE 80-96 - Another weak component in my truck ?!?!

Ken Haley wrote;

Since the 8.8 is marginal even in lightweight Mustangs, I'd prefer
to install a 9 inch.

Wait a second, first some people have said my 5-speed Mazda built tranny is
a piece of caca, now you're telling me that my rear end (don't get personal
!) falls into the same category ? Grrrr. I DON'T THINK SO !!

No offense meant but, please sir, follow me up Cloride Canyon trail (Gila
Wilderness), let's rock crawl up Bailor Canyon (Las Cruces) or lets do some
of those famous stream crossings on our way to Hermosa...When we get back,
we will deliver a flat bed trailer loaded with alfalfa or pecan wood. Well
looky here, the rear end is still with us, we need to try harder...You get
the picture.
With 155k miles on our 1995 F-150 5.0L truck, I have had NO problems with
the rear end, transmission, engine, what so ever! And 4-wheelling, I do that
as often as possible.
This is a farm truck and a daily driver (75 miles round trip commute) and
yes I would take it in a heartbeat right now on a road trip-after an oil &
filter change. I cannot stress how reliable our FORD truck has been, even
with the 8.8" rear end and the leaking so called piece of caca 5-speed.
Yes, the radius arm bushing went out and were replaced, the auto-locking
hubs died right at 40K miles (whimpy whimpy, and God bless Warn), factory
battery died last month as well as the U-joints, the second set of shocks
are feeling spongy, and for Christmas last year I was putting in a new
clutch slave assembly, but damn, with 155 K miles would'nt you agree that
all this is trivial ? Do all that with a Chevy...
This truck of our may only be an F-150, but its no girly-man truck.

Rade, in your posting about Rubicon (lucky dog) you mentioned lockers, are
you talking about ARB lockers and did you do the install? I love to off-road
so any improvement in performance gets my attention. Wish I could afford to
do a lot more to mine besides just the necessary maintenance.

Question to all regarding a slight loss of power and the vents: I recently
noticed while driving with the air flowing through the vents, when the truck
comes under heavy load (such as in overdrive, the cruise control set and a
steep over-pass/incline), the air stops flowing from the vents and is
re-routed to the windshield/defroster vents.
Once the engine comes back off the load, the air goes back to circulating
through the regular vents. Crazy yah?!
This will occur with and without the AC on, and with or without the cruise
control on.
Now I know I am not normal, but I don't believe this has been happening
since the truck was brand new.
I have looked for a vacuum leak under hood without succes, and under the
dash seems so strange and unknown, but nothing appear out of the ordinary.
Suggestions? Non-serious ones will also be entertained.

Thanks for the space,

Phred, KD5AQB
La Union NM

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Date: Wed, 22 Sep 1999 13:30:36 -0700
From: Bob Kennedy
Subject: Re: FTE 80-96 - Another weak component in my truck ?!?!

Fred Moreno wrote:

Wait a second, first some people have said my 5-speed Mazda built tranny is
a piece of caca, now you're telling me that my rear end (don't get personal!)
falls into the same category ? Grrrr. I DON'T THINK SO !!

> This truck of our may only be an F-150, but its no girly-man truck.
>
> Rade, in your posting about Rubicon (lucky dog) you mentioned lockers, are
> you talking about ARB lockers and did you do the install? I love to off-road
> so any improvement in performance gets my attention. Wish I could afford to
> do a lot more to mine besides just the necessary maintenance.
>
> Question to all regarding a slight loss of power and the vents: I recently
> noticed while driving with the air flowing through the vents, when the truck
> comes under heavy load (such as in overdrive, the cruise control set and a
> steep over-pass/incline), the air stops flowing from the vents and is
> re-routed to the windshield/defroster vents.
> Once the engine comes back off the load, the air goes back to circulating
> through the regular vents. Crazy yah?!
> This will occur with and without the AC on, and with or without the cruise
> control on.
> Now I know I am not normal, but I don't believe this has been happening
> since the truck was brand new.
> I have looked for a vacuum leak under hood without succes, and under the
> dash seems so strange and unknown, but nothing appear out of the ordinary.
> Suggestions? Non-serious ones will also be entertained.
>
> You will have a loss of engine vacuum which will affect the ducting system.
> Some of the doors are spring loaded, when the vacuum drops, they'll move. I'm
> sure you've checked for the vacuum leak, but this one could very well be just
> the end of the hose dry rotted.

Good luck,

Bob


>
>
>
>

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Date: Wed, 22 Sep 1999 13:37:36 PDT
From: "ken haley"
Subject: FTE 80-96 - Off axles and rivets.

Thanks to everyone for the advice on my broken axle. I have to replace the
entire axle, anyway, since the housing is now cracked, the 8.8 and 9 inch
axles cost the same in the junkyards, so I'd like to go the stronger 9 inch
if I can find out what bolts in easily. Any ideas? I do not want to spend
$1000 rebuilding anything.

Since my kid (who will eventually be old enough to drive the Bronco) is
talking dropped tube front axle, Econoline spindles, flipped spring perches
on the rear axle, P295(-15 tires, please have mercy on me. Insanity is
hereditary--you get it from your kids. Has anyone out there ever done a
lowered Bronco converted to 2 wheel drive?

As for the riveting vs. bolting debate, this I know something about: rivets
are cheaper than either bolts or welding for production work--automated
riveting machinery is less costly than automated welding and bolting
machinery. After all, riveting requires little more than a couple of
hammers.

I've had problems with bolts loosening up when replacing rivets. Swamp buggy
frames are notoriously prone to flexing, often breaking welds, rivets, and
bolts. I've even had Grade 8 bolts pull through mild and cold rolled steel,
with the flat washers becoming six-sided cups. I found meticulous attention
to detail with the following procedure really worked:

1) Any fastner surface contacting the parts to be connected must have the
edges of the fastener surface radiused. Otherwise the sharp edge
concentrates pressure on the parts causing a scoring of the parts that will
eventually stress fracture. If you don't use washers make sure the heads of
the bolts don't have a sharp edge where they contact the part. Nuts are
usually already radiused, but check. Most flat washers are stamped, and have
a "sharp" side and a "dull" side. If you use washers, put the "dull" side
towaed the part. Radii need not be large enough to be visible--as long as
the edge feels "dull", that is enough. A file works well for doing radii.
Don't forget the slot of lockwashers, either. Star washers should not be
used in high stress areas.

2) As noted in other postings, the bolt shanks should fit the holes snugly.
This applies to the washers, too. Bolts should be a tight press fit in the
holes. The fit should not be so tight as to require a hammer, or else the
washer (and parts) will be deformed from the hammering, making a tight,
stable connection unlikely.

3) Grade 8 and Grade 10 bolts are stronger, size for size, than automotive
quality, or Grade 5. Unfortunately, stronger bolts are also more brittle,
and more prone to fracture. Grades are a trade off of tensile strength and
impact resistance. A sharp blow can fracture a Grade 8 or Grade 10 bolt.
I've yet to see a rivet, when smashed to retain parts, actually damage the
material it holds together. Either there is zero-tolerance riveting going on
(which is hardly characteristic of US automakers), or the rivets are made of
slightly softer materials than the parts they hold together. Brainstorming
(that means a bunch of good ol' boys and a couple of cases) this line of
reasoning, I decided to experiment. On my swamp buggy, I began installing
Grade 5 bolts instead of rivets or Grade 8 bolts, with the holes drilled to
press-fit shanks of the next-larger size bolt. Nothing broke (Including
where Grade 8 bolts had broken before), but I was forever retorqueing bolts.
(A maintenance chore.)

4) I measured the lengths of the bolts before installation and found that
the shanks were stretching, as oppossed to breaking, as the Grade 8 bolts
did. One observant old cuss noticed that the longer the distance from the
bolt head to the nut, on a bolt of a given diameter, the more it stretched.
To reduce this distance someone suggested I try threading one of the two
parts that were to be bolted, while still press-fitting the unthreaded part
to the bolt shank and washer. Once the parts were bolted together (with
Threadlocker) a flatwasher and locknut (with Threadlocker) were torqued
down.

5) Always use a torque wrench to SAE specs for the fastners you are using.
Too-tight fastenings either stretch (Grade 5) or break (Grade 8) much more
easily.

Well, I told you it was a meticulous process, but it is all I could find
that worked.

One other approach I've seen used with success is to use a backing plate on
each side and bolt it up with oversize bolts, washers and lock washers. This
method works, but it is ugly and heavy.

Still, while working as a front end specialist years ago, I replaced
hundreds of riveted ball joints with bolt-in ball joints, and never had
anyone complain about one falling out. I've relocated and swapped dozens of
riveted and/or welded crossmembers and subframes, fastening each with Grade
5 bolts, flatwashers, and locknuts that where barely tight enough in their
holes to not have to hold them while starting the nut.

Finally, consider if you are asking too much of your vehicle's design. If
your vehicle is modified and/or operated to the point that repeated breakage
is a problem, (not hard to do) maybe it is time to consider a more
appropriate vehicle for your purposes. I've never seen a good-running
monster truck with 5-ton axles hung on a stock frame. My neighbor tore up
several F-350 dualies trying to tow a stock trailer, finally buying a cheap,
used F-700 tractor just to tow his beef to market. The trailer was too heavy
for the F-350, but the F-700 had no problems with it. Also, every well-built
performance vehicle from offroad pre-runners to pro-street Mustangs begins
with chissis-stiffening mods such as subframe connectors, multipoint roll
cages, shock tower braces, etc, if not a complete chromemoly frame. Are you
asking your vehicle to perform beyond its design limits?


Ken
83 Bronco 302
86 Mustang 460 TrickFlow
86 Mustang convertible V-6
93 Mustand convertible 2.3 (yup, Pinto powered)

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Money isn't everything, but it keeps the kids in touch...

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Date: Wed, 22 Sep 1999 16:01:13 -0500
From: "Ed Mount"
Subject: Re: FTE 80-96 - vibration

Just out of curiosity, Dave, does the 50,000 mile drive train warranty
include the front axle and hubs on a 4X4?
Ed
- ----- Original Message -----
From: Dave Heverin
To:
Sent: Wednesday, September 22, 1999 12:15 PM
Subject: RE: FTE 80-96 - vibration


> Mike,
>
> At 50,000 miles the drive train should still be under warranty from FORD.
I
> had a 5year/60,000 mile warranty on all drivetrain components. You may
want
> to contact your favorite Ford dealer.
>
> I had a short block replacement at 70,000 miles on my 302. Ford's
mistake.
> They had a run of problems with 302 and 460 blocks that would cause the
> engines to develop piston slap. Even though I was outside of my warranty
> period they did the work at no charge. The transmission (120,000miles)
> started showing symptoms you describe plus not wanting to shift out of
> overdrive when I slowed down. I had the rebuild done at Bill & Earl's in
> Baltimore. It was definitely needed. They replaced all of the clutches
and
> the torque converter, plus they installed a retrofit shift valve from Ford
> to correct some shifting problems in the AOD transmission.
>
> Dave
> 88' F150, 302/AOD
> Bel Air, MD.
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Michael Surette [mailto:budsurette hotmail.com]
> Sent: Wednesday, September 22, 1999 12:15 PM
> To: 80-96-list ford-trucks.com
> Subject: FTE 80-96 - vibration
>
>
> Dave,
>
> I have a 302 with E4OD transmission. The drivetrain has just under 50,000
> miles on it. The vibration seems to get worse in cooler weather. If it
> happens to be as serious as a transmission rebuild, I would prefer to just
> swap the auto for a 5-speed manual. Does anyone know if that is a
> straightforward swap or if it will cause problems and cost an arm and a
leg?
>
> Mike
> Abingdon, MD
>
> Date: Tue, 21 Sep 1999 15:27:41 -0400
> From: Dave Heverin Subject: FTE 80-96 - RE:Mike,
>
> Which engine/transmission combination do you have? How many miles do you
> have on the drive train. On my 88' F150 with an AOD4 transmission I had a
> similar problem. The fix was a transmission rebuild.
>
> Dave
> Bel Air, MD
>
> - -----Original Message-----
> From: Michael Surette [mailto:budsurette hotmail.com]
> Sent: Tuesday, September 21, 1999 2:46 PMTo:
> 80-96-list ford-trucks.comSubject:
>
> Fellow list members,
>
> I have a 1996 F-150 Eddie Bauer Edition truck, 4x4, automatic, K&N
> airfilter.
>
> 3. I also get a vibration when my truck wants to get into a higher gear.
> Adding a little gas makes the vibration worse. I have to almost floor it
to
>
> upshift to the next gear and make the vibration go away. Engine mounts
are
> ok. Dealer says the transmission is also ok. Has anyone had the
> sameproblem?
>
> Mike
> Abingdon, MD
>
> ______________________________________________________
> > == FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html
> == FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

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Date: Wed, 22 Sep 1999 18:43:15 -0400
From: Fletcher Pilling
Subject: FTE 80-96 - 1990 F-150 tansmission/rear end

Hi fellow Ford owners.
First, for information, a 1990 F-150 would either have one of three
automatic transmissions (per the owners manual)
1. c-6
2. AOD
3. E40D

Now for the question.

On my 1990 F-150 with 302 and AOD, with 153,000. (I just bought the
truck so I do not know any history of it)
When I bought the truck, the trans. was bad so the dealer had it rebuilt
by a local trans. shop. I noticed that the truck did not have any power
and suspected that the shift points were not right.
The trans. guy adjusted the kickdown cable and it is a little better now
but there is a new problem.
When I am acceleration and let off of the gas, I get a jolt from the
drive train. This also occurs when the trans. is downshifting quick,
(like a sudden stop).
I do not think it is bad u-joints because the truck does not clunk when
put into gear. I could be wrong about the u-joints though.

the trans. guy says that I have slop in the rear end and that is the
problem. I did not notice the problem being this bad until they adjusted
the kick down cable. I just want to fix the problem before it becomes
terminal.

If the rear end needs to be replaced, i have a standard 3.55 rear gear
and would like to replace it with either a limited slip or a gear to get
better off the line acceleration ,but still keeping the rpms low at
highway speeds. any suggestions?

Thanks for all the great information this forum provides.

Fletcher Pilling
Mt. Pleasant, SC
1990 F-150 super cab
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Date: Wed, 22 Sep 1999 16:13:32 -0700
From: Bob Kennedy
Subject: Re: FTE 80-96 - 1990 F-150 tansmission/rear end

Fletcher Pilling wrote:

> Hi fellow Ford owners.
> First, for information, a 1990 F-150 would either have one of three
> automatic transmissions (per the owners manual)
> 1. c-6
> 2. AOD
> 3. E40D
>
> Now for the question.
>
> On my 1990 F-150 with 302 and AOD, with 153,000. (I just bought the
> truck so I do not know any history of it)
> When I bought the truck, the trans. was bad so the dealer had it rebuilt
> by a local trans. shop. I noticed that the truck did not have any power
> and suspected that the shift points were not right.
> The trans. guy adjusted the kickdown cable and it is a little better now
> but there is a new problem.
> When I am acceleration and let off of the gas, I get a jolt from the
> drive train. This also occurs when the trans. is downshifting quick,
> (like a sudden stop).
> I do not think it is bad u-joints because the truck does not clunk when
> put into gear. I could be wrong about the u-joints though.
>
> the trans. guy says that I have slop in the rear end and that is the
> problem. I did not notice the problem being this bad until they adjusted
> the kick down cable. I just want to fix the problem before it becomes
> terminal.

> If the mechanic called it the kick down linkage, find another mechanic. On the AOD that is the TV cable and it regulates fluid
> pressure in conjunction with engine RPM.
>
> Go to http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.baumannengineering.com and click on the AOD page to get the scoop on it.
>
> It appears you are adjusted a little high, it causes the symptoms you have described.
>
>
>
>
>
> If the rear end needs to be replaced, i have a standard 3.55 rear gear
> and would like to replace it with either a limited slip or a gear to get
> better off the line acceleration ,but still keeping the rpms low at
> highway speeds. any suggestions?

You can go to about any size ring gear with the 8.8 rear end. Off the line
acceleration would not be impacted by LS rear end, unless you are spinning
one wheel constantly.

You would need to do some calculating to figure how high to go. If you
increase tire size, you could get away with a higher gear as well. You are
probably looking at a 4.10 for stock tires.


>
>
> Thanks for all the great information this forum provides.
>
> Fletcher Pilling
> Mt. Pleasant, SC
> 1990 F-150 super cab
> == FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

Bob


== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 22 Sep 1999 16:41:28 PDT
From: "ken haley"
Subject: Re: FTE 80-96 - Another weak component in my truck ?!?!

Hey, Phred,

Ya oughta no better to accept crazy responses:

Ya don't have to sell me on the abilities of a well-driven F-150. I bought a
new one in 1979; I-6, 4 speed, 3:50 or there abouts axles with factory
limited slip in the back, L78-15 bias ply highway tires, and a step bumper.
Oh, and it was sky blue with gold and white graphics--the Explorer option.
Picked her up from the dealer on a monday, put 4.56s in on tuesday and
stopped by the tire store on the way home from work for a set of 9/33-15 6
ply off brand mud wumpers. Yup, really tall and skinny.

There was a 4X4 trailride sponsered by some jeep club in the Carolina
mountains advertised on the radio, so I showed up early Saturday morning.
Sadly, the radio add neglected to say that anything wider than the old CJs,
Broncos, Scouts, and Toyotas wasn't allowed on the narrow trails. Us fellas
with real trucks were just a tad put out about that.

Well, as I perused the map of the days trail ride, I noticed I knew the
mountain were the ride was suppossed to stop for lunch, having been there
many times on the old Honda trailbike. I also noticed that the old logging
road up the north side of the mountain wasn't on the map.

Well, it didn't take long to find a couple of cohorts willing to tackle the
north slope--a 77 F-150, a 78 Bronco, and one of the old military surplus
Dodge PowerWagons left over from Korea or something.....


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