80-96-list-digest Friday, December 25 1998 Volume 02 : Number 426



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Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1980-1996 Trucks and Vans
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In this issue:

Subject: Re: FTE 80-96 - RE- Exhaust Upgrade
FTE 80-96 - RE; Harbor Freight Tools
FTE 80-96 - RE: Diesel Fuel Gelling
FTE 80-96 - Merry Christmas, Happy Hanuka, Feliz Navidad...!!!!
FTE 80-96 - Seasons Greetings
Re: FTE 80-96 - RE:Digital Multitester
FTE 80-96 - How to prime an oil pump
FTE 80-96 - Re: Diesel newbie
Re: FTE 80-96 - How to prime an oil pump
Re: FTE 80-96 - How to prime an oil pump

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Date: Thu, 24 Dec 1998 11:15:09 -0600
From: "Stephen W. Hansen"
Subject: Subject: Re: FTE 80-96 - RE- Exhaust Upgrade

I might be interested in learning about how to trouble shoot that. It is a
1992 F-250-351
I really don't think there is a problem, for I saw the immediate effects on
the vehicle after the exhaust change. I was looking for the "less pressure
is better syndrome" and I do have a larger diameter pipe than 2". The guys
at the exhaust shop also warned me about back pressure and torque. With my
truck configuration, rear end gear ratio, trans, and all, it moved my low
end up just a bit, so that I can feel it. Some kids may have the same
results, but are so impressed with the new sound that they do faster starts
and not notice it. I use to do 55mph with the cruse in 5th (OD) at about
1800 rpm, now you can almost think the eng is too slow to maintain that, but
if you push the speed up to 60 it feels better and the end rpm is at about
1700-1800.
Steve
>>Sounds to me like you have some other problem with your >>truck. Possibly
you have a speed/density system that is just too far off >>at the low end,

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Date: Thu, 24 Dec 1998 11:21:02 -0600
From: "Stephen W. Hansen"
Subject: FTE 80-96 - RE; Harbor Freight Tools

Harbor Freight does have some actual stores. There is one in Boise ID, but I
don't know where any others are
Steve

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Date: Thu, 24 Dec 1998 09:31:02 -0800
From: "Posluszny, Walt (POSL)"
Subject: FTE 80-96 - RE: Diesel Fuel Gelling

I'm not an expert on diesel fuel gelling, but I do have some
experience with it. Diesel fuel has a fair amount of paraffin in the fuel, I
believe the paraffin actually acts as a lubricant for the injector pump (but
am not 100% sure). The paraffin(wax) is what begins to coagulate or gel at
low temperatures. When the temps rise again the paraffin goes back into
solution, although there may be some settling out of the heavier paraffin's
(there's actually a range of molecular weights for the paraffins). In
Alaska, they usually cut Diesel #2 with (I can't remember now - old age
setting in) to make Diesel #1. Some additives are designed for this and
will help to a certain point. If your talking real cold, you could get
Diesel #1 at a truck stop or try to cut it yourself in an emergency.

And yes, Jet A is closer to kerosene than to Diesel...... little/no
paraffin. That's why you can burn kerosene in your home; and since the air
temp at 35,000 feet is usually -35 or lower, you don't want wax in your
fuel.

Walt
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Date: Thu, 24 Dec 1998 14:05:00 -0600
From: "Dave Harmier"
Subject: FTE 80-96 - Merry Christmas, Happy Hanuka, Feliz Navidad...!!!!

And anything I missed!!!!

And as pertains to jetting...it is VERY important! Have an 81 Suzuki 1000
that ran like HELL (pipe/individual filters) until I raised the needles
.035, and upped the main jet size X2....Now it SCREAMS!!!

If I could just do that to my F-150 eh?

Dave H.
92 F-150 S/C 5.0 E4OD
dharmier gte.net
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Date: Thu, 24 Dec 1998 18:19:09 -0500
From: "Bruce A. Ramirez"
Subject: FTE 80-96 - Seasons Greetings

Merry Christmas to all. I hope everyone has a safe and joyous holiday.

Bruce Ramirez
1991 F-150 4x4
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Date: Thu, 24 Dec 1998 21:43:49 -0500
From: "T.C. Stoppelbein"
Subject: Re: FTE 80-96 - RE:Digital Multitester

I'm a tech. (not a cable guy) so I'm kind of spoiled. You can get VOM's at
whatever price you care to pay.Fluke is the best,some are very expense but
they make many models under 50 bucks.So spend whatever it's worth to
you.Even the cheap ones are good.
- -----Original Message-----
From: Posluszny, Walt (POSL)
To: '80-96-list ford-trucks.com'
Date: Tuesday, December 22, 1998 1:40 PM
Subject: FTE 80-96 - RE:Digital Multitester


>Can anyone make a recommendation on a favorite digital multitester? I've
>heard real good ones are upward of $100 and the better ones have a high
>impedance(I don't know what that means), but I am no electrical engineer so
>if I'm going to ask for an expensive Christmas present I'd like to ask for
>one that will pretty much handle everything I need. My needs include
vehicle
>circuit testing and around the house stuff, not much more than that. Can
>folks please make suggestions, brand , model, good place to get at a
>discount? You can e-mail me directly if you prefer. Thanks Walt
>== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html
>

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Date: Thu, 24 Dec 1998 23:54:21 -0500
From: "Robert Bowman"
Subject: FTE 80-96 - How to prime an oil pump

Hello everyone,

I recently purchased an 86 Ford Bronco with a 5.0 EFI engine. The engine
oil pressure was normal when the engine was cold but would drop real low
after the engine warmed up. The engine didn't smoke or have any kind of
miss. The price of the truck was low enough where an engine replacement was
assumed in the purchase price.

I went ahead and replaced the oil pump hoping that this may solve the
problem. Now the engine has zero oil pressure. I primed the oil pump with
motor oil like the Hanes repair manual stated, but now I understand that
some oil pumps require grease or petroleum jelly to prime.

My question is How do I prime the oil pump with the pump already installed ?
Also, where can I find a better repair manual ?
One person suggested that I remove the distributor and take a drill and
prime the oil pump that way.
Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks, Rob


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Date: Thu, 24 Dec 1998 20:21:47 -0900
From: "L WALTERS"
Subject: FTE 80-96 - Re: Diesel newbie

The main difference between JET-A and Diesel is lubricity, the jet fuel
doesn't have the lubricating additives to keep pump, nozzles and other
moving parts lubricated. There is a method of adding trany fluid to the jet
fuel to compensate.
I have run Diesel # 2 in temps below 20 deg F. with now gelling. But I
have noticed that just plain cold fuel running in external delivery systems
( piston and rotary injection pumps ) has a minor drivability effect until
engine temp reaches an honest 200 deg F.
There are anti-gel additives on the market.
Does this help?
Bart-AK

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Date: Thu, 24 Dec 1998 21:49:03 -0800
From: Bob Kennedy
Subject: Re: FTE 80-96 - How to prime an oil pump

Rob,
You can remove the distributor, (careful, make sure you mark the position of the
rotor when you remove it. It'll need to go back in the same position.) The
hexagonal shaft you see in the hole the distributor came out of is the oil pump
drive shaft. Make sure it is seated in the oil pump.

There is not an easy way to see if the Oil Pump is working correctly. If you
have swapped it out, an oil priming should be fine.

As far as manuals go, I've got a Haynes and a Chiltons and I think I hit both of
them every time I'm under mine, (also an 86 302 EFI)

Bob


Robert Bowman wrote:

> Hello everyone,
>
> I recently purchased an 86 Ford Bronco with a 5.0 EFI engine. The engine
> oil pressure was normal when the engine was cold but would drop real low
> after the engine warmed up. The engine didn't smoke or have any kind of
> miss. The price of the truck was low enough where an engine replacement was
> assumed in the purchase price.
>
> I went ahead and replaced the oil pump hoping that this may solve the
> problem. Now the engine has zero oil pressure. I primed the oil pump with
> motor oil like the Hanes repair manual stated, but now I understand that
> some oil pumps require grease or petroleum jelly to prime.
>
> My question is How do I prime the oil pump with the pump already installed ?
> Also, where can I find a better repair manual ?
> One person suggested that I remove the distributor and take a drill and
> prime the oil pump that way.
> Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
>
> Thanks, Rob
>
> == FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

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Date: Fri, 25 Dec 1998 01:27:22 -0500
From: "NCWeb"
Subject: Re: FTE 80-96 - How to prime an oil pump

Robert (guys forgive me if this e-mail is not setup correctly; temporarily
usin Outlook, but I'll be back to Communicator/Messenger in a day or two),

I've only primed GM motors (sorry...yes I am ashamed...), but have never
used any grease or jellies to prime. I've always assembled the motor w/o
the distributor. On most GM's the pump shaft is about 3/8" w/a large slot
in it. I semi-fabricated a flat head screwdriver and a socket. Slipping
the socket (tapping it until it seated actually) on the end of the flat head
acts as a 'finder' and will not allow the head head to slip out of place.
The tricky part is having the perfect width screwdriver head to seat in the
corners of a 3/8" drive socket. A bigger six-point socket will usually fit
over the screwdriver head and then I connected that to a 6" extension and
finally my 3/8" air ratchet. It sounds silly and McGyverish (looks it too)
but it works. A drill would be fine too. The only way I can think to check
to see if it's pumping is to remove a valve cover -OR- you could probably
have someone check the oil level while you're priming since it would drain
the pan some. You'd have to check before priming to as a comparison.
Bob Kennedy mentioned a hex shape on the pump drive shaft. That'd be WAY
easier to get to than the setup I described. Also you won't be just priming
the oil pump, but in fact, the entire engine which is a good thing. :-)

Later,
Brew

- -----Original Message-----
From: Robert Bowman
To: 80-96-list ford-trucks.com
Date: Friday, December 25, 1998 12:01 AM
Subject: FTE 80-96 - How to prime an oil pump


>Hello everyone,
>
>I recently purchased an 86 Ford Bronco with a 5.0 EFI engine. The engine
>oil pressure was normal when the engine was cold but would drop real low
>after the engine warmed up. The engine didn't smoke or have any kind of
>miss. The price of the truck was low enough where an engine replacement
was
>assumed in the purchase price.
>
>I went ahead and replaced the oil pump hoping that this may solve the
>problem. Now the engine has zero oil pressure. I primed the oil pump with
>motor oil like the Hanes repair manual stated, but now I understand that
>some oil pumps require grease or petroleum jelly to prime.
>
>My question is How do I prime the oil pump with the pump already installed
?
>Also, where can I find a better repair manual ?
>One person suggested that I remove the distributor and take a drill and
>prime the oil pump that way.
> Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
>
>Thanks, Rob
>
>
>== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html
....


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