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Date: Sun, 18 Mar 2001 06:05:36 -0500 (EST)
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Subject: 61-79-list Digest V2001 #87
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61-79-list Digest Sat, 17 Mar 2001 Volume: 2001  Issue: 087

In This Issue:
Re: How to tell square/spread bore apart on 460
Re: More Q-Jet/4350
Re: More Q-Jet/4350
Re: More Q-Jet/4350
Re: Fastener Torque - was: ford plugs
Re: balance
Re: More Q-Jet/4350
Re: More Q-Jet/4350
Tonneau covers for Classics
Re: max displacement for gasoline eng.
Re: Fastener Torque - was: ford plugs
Re: More Q-Jet/4350
Re: Fastener Torque - was: ford plugs
QJ's
Re: Tonneau covers for Classics II
Adventures in Rustproofing
Re: Fastener Torque - was: ford plugs
Re: QJ's
Re: Assy Lube was Fastener Torque
Re: HEI vs Dura spark :-)
Re: Assy Lube was Fastener Torque
289/302 four barrel intake
manual to auto. swap
Re Parts cleaner
87 up 460's

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 03:16:08 -0500
From: George Selby <gselby4x4 earthlink.net>
Subject: Re: How to tell square/spread bore apart on 460


At 03:29 AM 3/17/01 -0500, you wrote:
>How do I know if I've got the proprietary Ford spread bore pattern or a
>more standard spread bore pattern on my current 460 intake? I don't want to
>buy a spread bore carb only to have it not fit cause its the Ford design.

Get a gasket for a conversion block, they are usually with the other
performance parts at parts stores.  Place it on your manifold.  If the
studs/bolt holes align with the outer holes, it uses the Motorcraft 4350
(unusual pattern.)  If it is on the inner holes, then its a spreadbore
(Q-Jet) pattern.

George Selby
70 F-100 Ranger XLT 400 C6
78 F-150 4x4 400 4 spd
86 Nissan 300ZX
92 Subaru Legacy Wagon AWD
gselby4x4 earthlink.net
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.usedcarsandparts.com


------------------------------

Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 03:25:08 -0500
From: George Selby <gselby4x4 earthlink.net>
Subject: Re: More Q-Jet/4350


At 03:29 AM 3/17/01 -0500, you wrote:
>The Qjet is quite differnt in appearance and operation and has a
>vacuum operated baffle on top of the secondaries which I've never seen on a
>ford carb.

Actually the Motorcraft 4350 has an air door over the secondaries.  The
secondaries are directly mechanically operated by the throttle, and vacuum
opens the air door over the secondaries gradually, allowing the secondaries
to be engaged only when the engine needs it (just like a Q-Jet.)  Thus you
can't overcarburate with a 4350, it will limit itself to the engine's
requirements. I think its a 850, though.

It also uses a center hung float, which is why Jeep used them as the
four-barrel on the AMC 360 and 401 engines in Cherokees and
Wagoneers.  They use the 2150 as the two barrel for the same reason:
improved off road ability. Jeep tended to uses the strongest equipment
available (other than engine) from the other Big Three.  My Jeep has a
Chrysler tranny and starter, Ford carb and ignition, New Process t-case, GM
brakes and steering, and a Dana front axle.

George Selby
70 F-100 Ranger XLT 400 C6
78 F-150 4x4 400 4 spd
86 Nissan 300ZX
92 Subaru Legacy Wagon AWD
gselby4x4 earthlink.net
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.usedcarsandparts.com


------------------------------

From: JUMPINFORD aol.com
Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 05:57:37 EST
Subject: Re: More Q-Jet/4350

In a message dated 3/17/2001 12:27:15 AM Pacific Standard Time,
gselby4x4 earthlink.net writes:


> Jeep tended to uses the strongest equipment
> available (other than engine) from the other Big Three.  My Jeep has a
> Chrysler tranny and starter, Ford carb and ignition,

I have to disagree with a small part of that statement.  Ford electronic
ignition sucks compared to Chrysler or GMs.  The only reason to switch it is
to get rid of points.  Id be willing to bet at least 60% of us carry an extra
ignition box just because we all know what can happen.  ESPECIALLY if you
were to broke to get a good box, so your runnin the 13.99 Wells brand from
Autozone.  I'm the last person to say anything bad about Ford, but if Jeep
was using the best, there would be Mopar ignition on those, not our stuff.
Anyone need to ask why Tweety is runnin a Jacob's?  The stang will be getting
an MSD box as soon as Im done spendin all my extra money on the truck.  Just
not worth the hassle to stay with a Ford box.

Darrell & Tweety



------------------------------

From: "G & J Boling" <flash1 alltel.net>
Subject: Re: More Q-Jet/4350
Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 07:48:42 -0500


I have to disagree with a small part of that statement.  Ford electronic
> ignition sucks compared to Chrysler or GMs
=========================================================
i,ve got a OEM ignition still in my 78 f 100 with 180,000 miles on it and it
STILL starts every time i hit the key and sets at times for 2 or more months
between starts
gordon



------------------------------

From: "GaryBBB" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: Fastener Torque - was: ford plugs
Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 08:20:28 -0800


Well, I can't say I totally disagree with you but......If you pull on a bolt
and it doesn't move are you sure it is properly torqued?  I guess I should
have said "If it doesn't move"....or did I?  Once all bolts have been
torqued the likelyhood of anything moving is astronomically unlikely by
moving one bolt at a time.  If you are the one who initially torqued it and
it is a head bolt and you are retorquing hot then I would expect all of them
to move slightly but again, torque is a rough estimate to generate correct
bolt tension so who really cares?  If it doesn't move just assume it's
correct and move on, eh?

As for torquing things hot, seems to me I read that the scientists that tell
God what to do have decided that was not a good idea?  Certainly it is not a
good idea with aluminum heads or other parts.  As long as the bolts have the
same coefficient of linear expansion as the heads it shouldn't matter really
but when warm the bolt holes do expand a little so could allow a little more
movement but with studs I wouldn't expect much change??  The primary reason
for retorquing anything, hot or cold is that the gaskets will take a set and
often cause the bolt tension to lessen leaving the possibility for leaks
etc..

Front end specs are very wide for the reasons you mention to allow a good
shop manager or mechanic to try to customize the settings for the customer.
Off road people will often go even outside of those specs to suit their
conditions and for camber, a good mechanic will make different settings on
each side to make it steer correctly but, as you say it will only steer
correctly under the conditions you set it for.  Tell you customer to use
narrow tires and it will steer better :-)

I certainly do agree with you that you should go by the book but if the book
is "Clearly" wrong then you are either misinterpreting it or it is a typo.
The most common misinterpretation I've seen so far is the preload on front
wheel bearings and I can guarantee you there are professionals out there who
still torque them to 50# and leave them that way.......I'm sure they don't
stay professionals very long or they change their interpretation but it's
still out there.

On the lubes, I mostly agree too but it has been proven than graphite oils
will reduce the required torque by a significant amount and on structural
parts or internal engine parts this can cause catastrophic failure so I
mentioned it.  Virtually any other lube is roughly the same I suppose but my
point was that there are some exceptions so it pays to pay attention to some
of these things :-)  BTW, I agree that "Clean" is more important too :-)

These are my opinions, some based on books and some on classes I've taken
and some on my own reasonings so take them as opinion, not fact, eh?

--
Happily Retired (but broke)
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
--

> I just have to say this.  I LOOVEE to hear the why as to how
> things work.  I
> cant explain or dis explain why THE BOOK says to do this or that.  I can
> tell you this, you go by your own expieriences with YOUR vehichles and try
> to apply it across the the board to the average Customer, or Joe
> Shmoe, your
> gonna get screwed someday!!


------------------------------

From: "GaryBBB" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: balance
Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 08:34:26 -0800


Actually I was grasping at straws.  I just did a clutch that had springs
completely moved out of place and don't recall any vibration so I stand
corrected:-)

Are you saying if the shock springs in the disk are loose it won't move?  or
the pressure plate?  I'll reserve comment til I hear :-)

--
Happily Retired (but broke)
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
--

> I dont think even a disloged 1/4 ounce spring from the clutch
> disk caught up
> in the pressure plate would cause the vibration you describe


------------------------------

From: "GaryBBB" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: More Q-Jet/4350
Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 08:39:48 -0800


Only ford box I've lost was after about 150k miles and it was an internal
short.  Only other problem I've ever had with it is the stupid black plugs
and that could sure be improved on.  How many with HEI have never replaced
the rotor.........How often do you have to do it?

--
Happily Retired (but broke)
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
--

> I have to disagree with a small part of that statement.  Ford electronic
> ignition sucks compared to Chrysler or GMs.  The only reason to
> switch it is
> to get rid of points.


------------------------------

From: "GaryBBB" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: More Q-Jet/4350
Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 08:43:33 -0800


Oooooops!:-)  I have several of them but haven't looked at one in a long,
long time, sorry :-)
I believe the Rochesters have the numbers embossed in the base casting which
Holley/Fords typically don't except possibly for the general number for
"Carb" but I haven't looked so could be wrong there too.  I know the
Rochesters do have the model numbers on them.

--
Happily Retired (but broke)
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
--

> Actually the Motorcraft 4350 has an air door over the secondaries.  The
> secondaries are directly mechanically operated by the throttle,
> and vacuum
> opens the air door over the secondaries gradually, allowing the


------------------------------

From: "Desanto, Phillip" <pdesanto Cinergy.com>
Subject: Tonneau covers for Classics
Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 09:50:18 -0500


Steve / LIST, here's the name of that place that makes "flush fit" hard and
soft bed covers for late model as well as "classic" trucks. It's called
Checkmate, it's in Benton, KY. They have a web site address too , but I
haven't seen it. < www.checkerpro.com >  They'll send this little color
flyer out for free. ( 800-944-9319 )  They've got fixed and hinged covers in
both fiberglass and soft, ranging in cost from $169.00 to $389.00.
    They will also build "custom" sizes for beds with sleepers or tool
boxes. The vinyl covers come in different colors and they also make some
from aluminum treadplate.
     I have no affiliation with them, but this is the only place I could
find that catered to "our" needs.    Good luck, Phil  ( 64 F-100
PharfrÜmfinisht )

------------------------------

From: SpeedyFords cs.com
Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 15:15:10 EST
Subject: Re: max displacement for gasoline eng.


In a message dated 3/16/01 10:12:35 AM Alaskan Daylight Time,
listar ford-trucks.com writes:

<< Somewhere
> I heard that ~500 ci was the practical limit for "normal" gas engines. >>

John was correct in stating that many aircraft engines are an exception to
this idea.
As an airplane mechanic here in Alaska, I still have the pleasure of working
on radial engines.  Individual cylinder displacements often run 100 - 150
cubic inches. Take that times nine cylinders (or more) and you get the idea.
Even the more modern engines in Cessnas and the like have six cylinders and
still displace 540 -550 C.I.  I think the survival issue with
large-displacement gasoline engines is to limit RPMs.
FTE content - Ford trucks are clearly the best airplane parts haulers!

Tim in Anchorage
'67 F-100 2wd 390/C6 and almost done!
'79 F-250 4X4 SC 460/C6

------------------------------

From: "John LaGrone" <jlagrone ford-trucks.com>
Subject: Re: Fastener Torque - was: ford plugs
Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 14:15:19 -0600


>snip<
> to move slightly but again, torque is a rough estimate to generate correct
> bolt tension so who really cares?  If it doesn't move just assume it's
> correct and move on, eh?
>
> As for torquing things hot, seems to me I read that the scientists that
tell
> God what to do have decided that was not a good idea?  Certainly it is not
a
> good idea with aluminum heads or other parts.  As long as the bolts have
the
> same coefficient of linear expansion as the heads it shouldn't matter
really
> but when warm the bolt holes do expand a little so could allow a little
more
> movement but with studs I wouldn't expect much change??  The primary
reason
> for retorquing anything, hot or cold is that the gaskets will take a set
and
> often cause the bolt tension to lessen leaving the possibility for leaks
> etc..
>snip again<

I guarantee that if you do not re-torque a head gasket as specified by the
manufacturer you will be pulling that head in short order. Not only does the
gasket set and leave the bolt loose, but head bolts don't have the same
coefficient of expansion as the surrounding block and head material. Two
different alloys can't have the exact same physical properties. They can be
close, but always different. Cast iron is too brittle to make bolts from,
aluminum is too soft. Some brands of engines require new bolts when you
re-assemble. I think the Cadillac HT4100 is one such system. Very long head
bolts. Aluminum and cast iron components. Very difficult to take one of
those engines apart and put it back together correctly.

--John LaGrone
jlagrone ford-trucks.com
See Henry at: http://www.ford-trucks.com/jlagrone/henry.home.htm


------------------------------

From: "John LaGrone" <jlagrone ford-trucks.com>
Subject: Re: More Q-Jet/4350
Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 14:21:39 -0600


>How many with HEI have never replaced
> the rotor.........How often do you have to do it?

The only GM HEI failures I ever had were the rotor and the cap. The spring
loaded center conductor in the cap would wear away to nothing in not very
many miles (20K). I was stranded several times due to this in various
vehicles. I have had no ignition related failures in either of my FoMoCo
vehicles in a combined 100k+ miles. I replace my rotor and cap about every
50k as routine maintenance.
--John LaGrone
jlagrone ford-trucks.com
See Henry at: http://www.ford-trucks.com/jlagrone/henry.home.htm


------------------------------

From: "Bill Beyer" <bbeyer pacifier.com>
Subject: Re: Fastener Torque - was: ford plugs
Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 14:28:26 -0800

---- Original Message -----
From: "rich" <richth exis.net>
To: <61-79-list ford-trucks.com>
Sent: Friday, March 16, 2001 11:40 PM
Subject: [61-79-list] Fastener Torque - was: ford plugs


> I just have to say this.  I LOOVEE to hear the why as to how things work.
I
> cant explain or dis explain why THE BOOK says to do this or that.  I can
> tell you this, you go by your own expieriences with YOUR vehichles and try
> to apply it across the the board to the average Customer, or Joe Shmoe,
your
> gonna get screwed someday!!  I can spend all day telling you stories of
how
> DUMB mechanic's got screwed over by listneing to a person who has 2 or 3
> versions of a manufacturers product and can explain everything based on
> comon sence and their expierience.  Heck, I'm probably guilty of the same
> biased attitude))).  I guess you can consider "The Book" as an average of
> the two extreems.  A stupid example here, front end alignement, Garys'
> bronco calls for X number of degrees of Caster and Camber for the front
end
> Alignement.  This is based on a factory Bronco, averaging X number of
> degrees slope from the center of the road to the side etc, which can vary
> from state to state, county to county.  I'm guessing Ford based this
> decision on an average wheight person in the drivers side AND a passenger
in
> the right side seat.  Well, guess what, lets say Gary weighs 290 and never
> carries a passenger. I set up his Bronco to the factory alignement
settings.
> He claims his truck pulls to the left so I must not know what I'm doing.
Is
> the book wrong?  For the average joe mechanic, the book can protect his
A**.
> Any problems arrise, he can point to the BOOK in his defence.

Alignment specs always have a range +/- for the very reasons you mentioned.

> Even if your using vasoline, if the the treads are clean, is this even an
> issue as far as torque is concerned? (not counting hydrolock here) Does
the
> difference in torque in a 3/8 hardned bolt and nut using "light 30wt" oil
> vrs "STP Heavy" lubricant really warrant a different torque spec? Again,
I'm
> thinking as the average person on this list putting his first, 5th, 15th
or
> hypo motor together.  Thats why there is a variance in the specs, ALL
specs.

I can tell you that ARP bolts have very different torque specs based on what
type of lubricant used on the threads. They vary as much as 25-30# depending
on whether you use moly lube or motor oil.

> Growing up, I tried everything from STP, vasoline, several weights of oil,
> engine assembly lube, even cam assembly lube putting together motors, just
> to see what may work better than the other.  Bottom line, if you build a
> short block that is going to set for awhile, use a thick lube on the
bearing
> journals and stand it on end. If your going to build a motor and run it
> soon, use your favorite brand of oil for the whole assembly.

Assembly lube should be used on bearing surfaces. Cam assembly lube should
be used on cams, lifters and rockers. Motor oil is fine for the rest.



------------------------------

From: "Azie L. Magnusson" <maggie11 HiWAAY.net>
Subject: QJ's
Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 18:21:37 -0600

Gary writes:  >>Are you sure they were Qjets?  Ford has it's own spread bore pattern which
is not compatible with the Rochester, Holley or Thermoquad.  This is the
most common 460 manifold but also the most useless for most of us who want
to use after market carbs.  It is totally Ford proprietary and only the
stock Ford carb will work with it.<<

No..  I'm not absolutely positively sure, but I read this someplace.  When the
385 series made its debut, I was strictly an FE Guru, so I missed the better
part of the 385's.. I'm into them now though.  Have 3 running and 2 not running.
I'm sure someone on this list knows for sure.  I read it as being offered definately
on Tbirds and some other cars, but I'm not sure which others were involved.

I'm well aware of the Ford spreadbore not being compatable with the GM
and MOPAR spreadbores.  Those are pretty darn good carbs in themselves
I think(the Ford spreadbores - that is.)..

Azie Magnusson
Ardmore, Al.


------------------------------

From: oldfords63 juno.com
Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 19:41:47 -0500
Subject: Re: Tonneau covers for Classics II


I meant Tim, Sorry.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> > > Steve / LIST, here's the name of................
________________________________________________________________
GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO!
Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less!
Join Juno today!  For your FREE software, visit:
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://dl.www.juno.com/get/tagj.

------------------------------

From: oldfords63 juno.com
Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 19:40:14 -0500
Subject: Adventures in Rustproofing




Hi all, just got done using another product I've wanted to try and I
thought I'd let you guys know how it went in case your going to be doing
something similar soon.
I'm still in the process of reviving a 64 F-100 and I wanted the new
"imported" bed to hold up better then the first one.
  I sandblasted the whole thing underneath and inside. (NOT the outer,
sides though)  I had
to replace the bed floor due to some rust and damage. After I had the new
steel welded in I painted everything BUT the outer skin with POR-15.
(intire bottom, wheel wells, and inside of bed) I'm having a spray in bed
lining installed after it's painted, so I also had to paint the inside of
the bed with their  "Tie-Coat" primer to get a good bond. It goes on real
nice. You can spray, brush, or roll it on. Since it's almost all flat,
and will be covered with a textured finish, I used a small foam "trim"
roller.

 It's a single-component, polyurethane primer. It's a real light blue
and
dries to a satin finish,and it seems to sand like any other good primer .
To give you an idea about coverage, it took 1 quart to paint the intire
inside with 2 coats. It also will come off your hands with thinner,
unlike the POR-15 paint that only comes off with time.  Hope this helps
anybody that needs it, Phil

________________________________________________________________
GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO!
Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less!
Join Juno today!  For your FREE software, visit:
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://dl.www.juno.com/get/tagj.

------------------------------

From: "GaryBBB" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: Fastener Torque - was: ford plugs
Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 20:22:28 -0800


This is true but the difference between the head material and head bolts
when iron is used is very slight but with aluminum it is very great.
Aluminum expands at a much higher rate than steel so special design
parameters are used to reduce the stresses etc. such as the bolts mentioned
below and head design considerations as well.

The escorts and festiva's have what are called "Torque to yield" head bolts
which are supposed to be used only once but I got away with it several times
:-)

--
Happily Retired (but broke)
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
--

> gasket set and leave the bolt loose, but head bolts don't have the same
> coefficient of expansion as the surrounding block and head material. Two
> different alloys can't have the exact same physical properties.


------------------------------

From: "GaryBBB" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: QJ's
Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 20:29:37 -0800


Azie, was that you who mentioned all the spread bore manifolds on EBay?  I
know they used them in at least one year, 68 I think but I was refering to
the fact that people assume a spreadbore is a rochester sometimes and you
can't be sure over the internet.  My contention was that if there are a lot
of a rare intakes out there someone is lying or making a mistake on
identification etc..  It's unlikely that there would be that many "Real"
Qjet, ford manifolds out there since they were only used on the CJ type
engines AFAIK.

--
Happily Retired (but broke)
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
--

> I'm sure someone on this list knows for sure.  I read it as being
> offered definately
>  on Tbirds and some other cars, but I'm not sure which others
> were involved.
>
> I'm well aware of the Ford spreadbore not being compatable with the GM
> and MOPAR spreadbores.  Those are pretty darn good carbs in themselves
> I think(the Ford spreadbores - that is.)..
>
> Azie Magnusson
> Ardmore, Al.


------------------------------

From: "GaryBBB" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: Assy Lube was Fastener Torque
Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 20:40:25 -0800


Here I completely agree with you Bill.  Cam assy lube is especially
important because the 20 minute break in period is critical to the life of
the cam and the special cam lube will protect it for the first few minutes
untill a good supply of oil can be generated.  The whole concept of breaking
in a cam is to keep it well oiled for a solid 20 minutes of running to
polish the bottoms of the lifters and the cam lobe surfaces so they match
each other perfectly.....before restarting with no oil pressure etc..  You
should not rotate a cam against the spring loaded lifters without this lube
on them and should avoid doing it any more than necessary before breaking it
in for the same reasons.

Some on the list may not realize that there is a 1 degree, sideways angle
(0r thereabouts) on the cam lobes to allow them to turn the lifters but
primarily to reduce the load on the engine and cam drive system.  By putting
this angle on the lobes you reduce the amount of actual contact surface
between the lobe and lifter, thus also reducing the friction.  Due to the
high stress load on this small area of hardned steel the break in and proper
assy lube are absolutely critical to success :-)

I know much less about bearing assy lube.  I've always used engine oil for
this.  Can you expand a little on this?

--
Happily Retired (but broke)
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
--

> Assembly lube should be used on bearing surfaces. Cam assembly lube should
> be used on cams, lifters and rockers. Motor oil is fine for the rest.


------------------------------

From: "GaryBBB" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: HEI vs Dura spark :-)
Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 20:42:07 -0800


This was the same complaint I heard from a Chevy mechanic :-)  That's why I
mentioned it :-)

--
Happily Retired (but broke)
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
--

> >How many with HEI have never replaced
> > the rotor.........How often do you have to do it?
>
> The only GM HEI failures I ever had were the rotor and the cap. The spring
> loaded center conductor in the cap would wear away to nothing in not very
> many miles (20K).


------------------------------

From: "Bill Beyer" <bbeyer pacifier.com>
Subject: Re: Assy Lube was Fastener Torque
Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 19:12:24 -0800

Assembly lube is just very light grease with extra EP additives. I only use
it for the rod & main bearings but I guess it could be used for the cam
bearings (not the lobes) as well. It stays on the bearing and journal
surface very well and, like the cam lube, provides that extra protection
needed during the initial start up.

/// Friends help you move...Real friends help you move bodies \\

----- Original Message -----
From: "GaryBBB" <gpeters3 lni.net>
To: <61-79-list ford-trucks.com>
Sent: Saturday, March 17, 2001 8:40 PM
Subject: [61-79-list] Re: Assy Lube was Fastener Torque



> I know much less about bearing assy lube.  I've always used engine oil for
> this.  Can you expand a little on this?




------------------------------

From: JJJJJGRANT aol.com
Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 22:34:15 EST
Subject: 289/302 four barrel intake


seems like i remember someone looking for a cast iron 289/302 four barrell
intake, i am putting an aluminum intake on my mustang, and would like to sell
the factory intake. who ever it was let me know if you are interested, also
have an aluminum one to sale.

thanks, jeff

------------------------------

From: "Stephen Brown" <snoopy1 ford-trucks.net>
Subject: manual to auto. swap
Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 20:09:55 -0800

Hey Everyone,
     I've got a C4 trans bolted to a 240c.i. six in my parts truck, and I would like to take the 4 speed manual
out of my 69' and replace it with the C4. My 69' has a 302c.i. in it. Will the bellhousing, flywheel, etc... bolt
up to the 302 ?
Thanks in advance.  :-)

Stephen Brown

71  F250   "Baby"
69  F100   project
68  F100  (parts truck)
94  Ranger Supercab XLT 4.0


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Date: Sat, 17 Mar 2001 23:00:13 -0600
From: Al Evitts <albert brightok.net>
Subject: Re Parts cleaner


With regards to that water soluable stuff from Harbor freight,  My
humble opinion is , it stinks, hard to use and don't get anything
clean.  Give me naptha or mineral spirits.

Al

------------------------------

From: "Greg Schnakenberg" <greg mail.dntcj.ro>
Subject: 87 up 460's
Date: Sun, 18 Mar 2001 08:52:39 +0200


Dave, I'd be VERY interested to see that article.  I know that as the older
motors are getting more and more scarce and expensive, people will figure
out how to make the newer stuff work.  I mean, look at all the 10 second
Hondas out there!!!

look thru your piles...ahem, files and see what you come up with.

Greg S.

<<I have a magazine article somewhere in my files(or is that piles ?  :-)
),
in which the engine builder ported a set of EFI heads and got them
flowing better than cast CJ heads . Said the exhaust port is much better ....


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