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Subject: 61-79-list Digest V2001 #35
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------------------------------------
61-79-list Digest Fri, 02 Feb 2001 Volume: 2001  Issue: 035

In This Issue:
Re: separation from your truck
Re: Reluctors
Re: Re Coil Grounding
Re: Site
Timing too advanced
Re: Site
Point Dwell (Was coil grounding, etc.)
Subject: Re: Ignition Timing
Re: Coil grounding
Buying a rebuilt engine
Re: Timing too advanced
Re: Buying a rebuilt engine
Coil Grounding (off topic)
f250 4x4 chassis
Re: zip ties and hay bales, was:ENGINE WONT START
Re: zip ties and hay bales, was:ENGINE WONT STAR T
Re: High tech discussions....
Re: grounding
Re: Coil Grounding (off topic)
Re: f250 4x4 chassis
Re: Coil grounding
Re: Buying a rebuilt engine
Re: Ignition Timing
Re: zip ties and hay bales, was:ENGINE WONT START
Re: f250 4x4 chassis
Re: Coil Grounding
ADMIN: Important FTE list survey

----------------------------------------------------------------------

From: "wish" <wish ford-trucks.net>
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 20:13:17 GMT
Subject: Re: separation from your truck


> and then you get the unquentiable thirst for a lil off road action,
>that you know your Mustang cant handle so you find yourself instagating a

>chase seen in the parking lot of the local casino searchin for that rush


Darrell, try the opposite sometime ... (March 15th is how many days away ?)


Just my $.02
wish

96 Mustang GT 5spd 4.6L
73ish 1/2ton 4x4   6.4L
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.public.iastate.edu/~wish

Ford Truck Enthusiasts
http://www.ford-trucks.com

------------------------------

From: luminous neteze.com
Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 11:44:08 -0800
Subject: Re: Reluctors



>The reluctor is nothing more than a star shaped piece of steel.
>The # of star "Points" depending on the # of cylinders being fed.
>How does it create anything by just passing by the magnetized coil
>(magnetic pickup)??

Azie,
The "star wheel" is indeed just a piece of soft iron. It is
not a magnet. The pickup coil is just a coil of wire wrapped
around an iron bar in close proximity to a magnet.
(You may have noticed that the pickup coil assembly contains
a magnet and likes to stick to your screwdriver)
The coil is enveloped in this magnetic field, but since the
coil and field are stationary (I.E. not moving with respect to
each other) the magnetism does not induce any current into the
coil of wire.
As the iron tooth of the reluctor wheel passes by the end of
the bar that the coil is wrapped around, it tends to "move"
the magnetic field and focus it in the gap between the reluctor
and the end of the pickup coil.

The idea behind this can be demonstrated by placing a magnet
under a thin piece of cardboard. Some iron filings are sprinkled
onto the cardboard above the magnet and shaken around gently.
The filings line up in an interesting pattern, aligning themselves
with the magnetic lines of force.
Now take a piece of soft iron and move it around near the filings.
The filings move and realign themselves in response to the
prescence of the iron bar, even tho the bar itself is not a magnet.
The magnetic flux has changed or moved because of the proxitmity of
the iron.

So, as a tooth from the reluctor wheel passes the pickup coil
it changes the magnetic flux intensity around the coil which
induces a small voltage into it. This voltage is amplified
and used as a control signal to turn a transistor on and off.

It's basically the same as moving a magnet near a coil of wire
to induce a voltage in it, except the coil AND magnet are stationary
and moving a piece of iron within the magnetic field bends or
"distorts" the field around the pick up coil.



>How about the "Hall effect" distributors in some vehicles being
>priduced today??  How do they work??  I've examined several, but
>the principal of operation is beyond me.

The principle behind hall effect sensors is complicated.
Basically, the sensor is a thin piece of semiconductor material
(Galium Arsenide or Indium Arsenide seem to be mentioned a lot)
A current is passed thru the semiconducter from one end to the
other. 2 leads are also attached to the semiconductor chip,
at locations on the chip perpendicular to the flow of current.
If a magnetic field is placed near the chip, it changes the
way current flows thru the chip and creates a small voltage
across the 2 leads which are perpendicular to the flow of current.

This change is NOT due to induced current from a changing
magnetic field, but is more like a shifting of where
the current flows within the chip, creating a measurable
voltage (usually only a few microVolts).
The effect does NOT rely on a moving magnetic field,
the field can be stationary and still be detected.

The theory is rather complex and altho I've read a lot about it
I still only have a most rudimentery understanding of it.


Here's a website that has the theory and math behind hall effect
devices, but it's not for the faint of heart...

http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.ece.drexel.edu/ECE/ECE-E302/LabIII(ecee302).html


 Cheers,

 Jim Imboden

 luminous neteze.com




------------------------------

From: luminous neteze.com
Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 11:44:10 -0800
Subject: Re: Re Coil Grounding



>You have provided a lot of good information in this thread, but all I really
>need to know is which wires to connect to which terminals, what components
>correctly make up the system, and how to adjust it to spec.

John (and all),
I probably have been guilty of trying to push "too much" information
onto the list. If I've offended or bored anybody, I apologise for
it now.

> Not many
>mechanics can do the math you have been presenting,

I sincerely hope you're wrong about this!

I'm comfortable with "not many mechanics are interested in
doing the math you have been presenting". That's O.K, I can
understand why. Math isn't a very exciting thing to most people.

But, the thought that "not many mechanics *can* do the math" is
a little scary to me.  The tiny bit of math I presented was
no more than the most basic high school algebra. It's only
marginally more dificult than calculating gas mileage...

I didn't intend that anyone would feel obligated to plug
any numbers in it and do the calculations.
I was only trying to get across the idea that the condensor
blocks the DC primary current while providing a suitable
return path for the secondary current, and provided the math
for capacitive reactance as proof that the theory is valid.

I realize that the majority of folks on the list are mostly
interested in keeping their trucks running and usually not
so interested in a lot of theory and math.
Personally, I *enjoy* understanding how things work, and also
find that a good understanding of the principles involved
can make troubleshooting ever so much easier when something
does breakdown.
I didn't expect that everyone would be interested, I'm just
a little surprised that some folks seem a tad offended,
especially considering how many LONG threads there sometimes
are on the list about things that have FAR less to do with
Ford trucks.

Again, so sorry if I came on too strong or offended anyone,

 Jim Imboden
  1970 F100, 240/6  T-18

 luminous neteze.com




------------------------------

Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 11:57:42 -0800
From: Dennis Pearson <dpearson ctc.edu>
Subject: Re: Site




"Azie L. Magnusson" wrote:

>
> That is a great site..  How in the world did you come across it??
> I bookmarked the home page, so I can try to learn myself and teach
> some others about things that interest us. Illustrations are great
> to use..
>
I agree.  However, I did note that the enigmatic coil, which I believe
started this thread, is still just as enigmatic...Just a round black
cannister with an "in" and an "out" with unanswered questions (until
this extremely intelligent group explained it) regarding what goes on
inside...We need to give thanks to Ken again for affording us this
opportunity...We may not be rocket scientists, but I sometimes try to
remember what life with my Ford Truck was like before I subscribed to
FTE...

--
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://counterculture.ws
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://ctc.edu/~dpearson/popcult.html
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://home.att.net/~dlpearson/lyrics.htm

------------------------------

From: "Azie L. Magnusson" <maggie11 HiWAAY.net>
Subject: Timing too advanced
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 14:26:34 -0600

Michael W. writes(among other things):  >>? I've had the
vacuum advance hooked up on ported vacuum,<<

Try manifold vacuum!!!  Doesn't ported vacuum increase with
increased flow while manifold decreases with increased load???
Just an idea!!

Azie Magnusson
Ardmore, Al.


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 14:28:50 -0600
Subject: Re: Re Coil Grounding
From: "John LaGrone" <jlagrone ford-trucks.com>


> Again, so sorry if I came on too strong or offended anyone,

Just to keep things straight, Jim, You nor anyone else offended me. I'm
pretty thick-skinned. I enjoy the discussions. Sometimes (believe it or not)
I just watch. The knowledge of the people on this list is awesome.

-- John
jlagrone ford-trucks.com     <]:-) <]:-)<]:-)<]:-)<]:-)<]:-)
1979 F150 Custom, Long Wide Bed, Regular Cab, 351M, C6 (Henry)
http://www.ford-trucks.com/jlagrone/henry.home.htm
Dearborn iron rules!!!!



------------------------------

Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 15:44:37 -0500
From: Ken Payne <kpayne ford-trucks.com>
Subject: Re: Site



>>
> I agree.  However, I did note that the enigmatic coil, which I believe
>started this thread, is still just as enigmatic...Just a round black
>cannister with an "in" and an "out" with unanswered questions (until
>this extremely intelligent group explained it) regarding what goes on
>inside...We need to give thanks to Ken again for affording us this
>opportunity...We may not be rocket scientists, but I sometimes try to
>remember what life with my Ford Truck was like before I subscribed to
>FTE...

Don't forget to thank one another.  FTE provides the means
but the users provide the information.

Ken




------------------------------

Date: Sat, 03 Feb 2001 16:54:40 -0500
From: DadsOlds <jhurd usadatanet.net>
Subject: Point Dwell (Was coil grounding, etc.)


> Making the points gap wider decreases the charging time, so it's
better optimized for low RPM use. (slower RPM = longer
charging time)
A smaller gap increases charging time, which is better
suited to
higher RPM.

  Yes, making the point gap wider decreases the dwell, but
it also changes the ignition TIMING! A change of one degree
in point dwell equals two degrees of timing on the
crankshaft. (Distributor runs at half crankshaft speed.) You
won't notice the difference in coil saturation time from a
small change in point dwell, but you will feel the change in
performance from its effect on the ignition timing.

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 03 Feb 2001 17:52:10 -0500
From: DadsOlds <jhurd usadatanet.net>
Subject: Subject: Re: Ignition Timing



>the dizzy is a single port
>canister and the timing is set to 13 or 14 degrees at 800 rpm idle.

  Don't know (remember) what year your canister is, but on
mine I can insert an allen wrench in the port and adjust the
vacuum advance spring pressure to vary the rate of vacuum
advamce to vacuum available. (Clockwise reduces spring
pressure for quicker vacuum advance, CCW slows it down.)

Jim in Central NY
'79 F-150 (302! w/204k miles)

------------------------------

From: BRussAZ aol.com
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 20:26:20 EST
Subject: Re: Coil grounding


In a message dated 2/2/01 6:49:03 AM Pacific Standard Time, gpeters3 lni.net
writes:

<< It took me a long time to meditate on 3 phase power to understand how three
wires with 177v could make a system that is rated at 480v!??  It is the
difference in "Potential" as stated that makes it work :-)  Now if I could
just understand how taps on transformers work........or why 240 is called
single phase or......(just kidding :-))

--
Happily Retired (but broke)
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary >>

If you really care about this stuff...contact off line but I think my input
of bypassin all the mis-information and checkin out the website
"howstuffworks.com" is enough on this thread....its actually gettin amusin...

Bill


------------------------------

From: Ben <bluesky6 ix.netcom.com>
Subject: Buying a rebuilt engine
Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 17:30:18 -0800


I'm looking for a rebuilt 300 to replace my leaky and creaky 240.

Here in the SF Bay Area, I found :

a. Economy Engine Sales $1050+$300 core
b. ATK for $1499+$195 core
c. Loyals for $995+$300 core

And in south California, there is United Engine for $595+$150 core.

Has anyone had good/bad experiences with any of them? Any advice I can
follow?

I'm considering United Engine, since they're probably the cheapest
even with freight charges. What do you think?

Thanks.

Ben

------------------------------

From: "GaryBBB" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: Timing too advanced
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 19:32:11 -0800


I believe ported is just delayed and has slightly less over all vacuum but
it acts the same way as manifold.  The difference is that you have to set
the timing and idle mixture differently when switching back and forth so it
will "Tip In" correctly from idle.  If I remember this thread, it sounds
like he's way too advanced and may have some other problems as well.

The timing you see on the timing light at 3k rpm, no load is at very light
throttle but maximum vacuum due to using very little throttle to get that
rpm with no load so the vac is at full advance along with about 13 degrees
of mechanical advance and the 14 initial which is a lot of advance.  Under
WOT load, if the vac is actually working (check this out first) you should
be getting about 28 + degrees with this setup which is way too much IMNSHO.
As already posted, try 6-10 degrees of advance, make sure the vac is working
correctly (grab the pickup and try to rotate the plate against the vac
spring), take a peek at the springs under the pickup plate (but don't touch
them!) and ensure that the rotor is working freely on the shaft.  The rotor
should turn independently from the main shaft about 13 degrees and move
smoothly and easily with spring pressure on it.

If any of these parts are sticking you will get severe spark knock when
stepping on it at low speeds, guaranteed even with proper initial
settings......

--
Happily Retired (but broke)
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
--

> Try manifold vacuum!!!  Doesn't ported vacuum increase with
> increased flow while manifold decreases with increased load???
> Just an idea!!
>
> Azie Magnusson
> Ardmore, Al.


------------------------------

From: "Jason and Kathy" <kendrick mddc.com>
Subject: Re: Buying a rebuilt engine
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 19:53:30 -0600



Ben wrote:
since they're probably the cheapest
> even with freight charges. What do you think?

Just remember Ben, you get what you pay for. I think you'll get a better
lasting engine if you take the time to rebuild it yourself. Plus, you'll get
an education if this is your first rebuild. Find a good machine shop, help
from a friend who's done it before, and you're home free.  Just my
thoughts...

Jason Kendrick


------------------------------

From: "rich" <richth exis.net>
Subject: Coil Grounding (off topic)
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 23:06:13 -0500


Trust me on this Gary, ya dont even want to "go there" on this list  :))
Our Electrical Engineering group almost went to war over this  topic at work
awhile back.  I'm sure some of the double E's on the list cringed and were
biting their tounges when they read your post. :)   Although I believe you
are talking about 2 completly different types of "grounds" here, I aint
touching this one!  ;)

Rich

>if you put two 10' stakes in the ground some distance apart and attach your
> tail light ground to one and the battery ground to the other you will have
a
>complete circuit.

CB antenna use a "Ground Plane"  I suspect this has a similar inferance?
>
> Happily Retired (but broke)
> Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
> 78 Bronco Loving, Gary



------------------------------

From: JJJJJGRANT aol.com
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 23:30:10 EST
Subject:  f250 4x4 chassis


anyone interested in a f250 4x4 chassis, four speed, divorced t case, dana 60
disc brake front end, dana 60 rear,  i guess its a high boy, 6 leaf springs
in front, cross member behind front bumper, has power steering also.  found a
mustang i want and need to move it on to someone else.

jeff

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 03 Feb 2001 06:37:38 -0800
From: dave Prasse <burgess4 gte.net>
Subject: Re: zip ties and hay bales, was:ENGINE WONT START




"Hogan, Tom (Portland)" wrote:
>I can hereby attest that round bales are the greatest thing
> since sliced bread!! :-)

But , they do not fit in an old barn very well , and they are hard to
feed
to milk cows in a stanchion barn ... guess that is why we still stack
around 3,000 small square bales/yr ...and nothing beats the exhilaration
of stacking the last load under the rafters when it is 130 degrees under
the tin roof w/100% humidity and no breeze ...I MISS SUMMER ....
When is global warming gonna kick in ?
we roll 100 of the big round bales/yr.

dave "round bales are for wimps :-)" Prasse
Freeport , IL

>
> Tom H.
> =============================================================
> To  unsubscribe:   www.ford-trucks.com/mailinglist.html#item3
> Please remove this footer when replying.

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 03 Feb 2001 06:45:42 -0800
From: dave Prasse <burgess4 gte.net>
Subject: Re: zip ties and hay bales, was:ENGINE WONT STAR T




Bad4dFilly aol.com wrote:
>but a sort of twine we call baling
> string, that stuff is amazing! You can use it for just about anything, and it
>
Yes , baling wire , baling twine and duct tape keeps a modern farm
going...
I carry 6 square bales in my Colony Park wagon

dP

------------------------------

From: "GaryBBB" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: High tech discussions....
Date: Sat, 3 Feb 2001 07:28:30 -0800


I enjoy these discussions because I am very curious about physics and
related mechanical things.  Unfortunately most people who are now going to
school to become mechanics have no understanding of such things and struggle
through to get their certification.  These are the ones who wind up at
dealers and struggle to make a living, not really having what most people
would call talent but I call a built in "Thing" that makes them curious
about mechanical things and thereby able to "soak" up knowledge on the
subject.  I've worked for Ford for 36 years and have seen very few skilled
tradesmen who were really worthy of the name due to this lack and the
classes I took at a local college gave me a view of our prospective, next
generation of, mechanics and I must say it really WAS scary.....:-(

This is not, by any means, to slight the professional mechanics we have on
this list but to simply say that there are many people out there making
their living working on vehicles and other mechanical things who are not
qualified to be mechanics.

Call me lazy or boring but I believe in only doing things I'm good at, it's
a lot more fun to go through life that way I think :-)  I get frustrated too
easily to try things that I'm not interested in or no good at (Sports and
Music come to mind :-)).  There are simply too many things I AM interested
in that I will never be able to master to even waste my time on the other
:-)  Keep the high tech stuff coming :-)

BTW there are exceptions to every rule and the one exception to my rule is,
now that I'm retired, I am going to plant a garden which I'm no good at but
all retirees have to have a garden (and a mustache but my wife made me shave
it off :-)) :-))  My wife and I both have "Black" thumbs :-)

--
Happily Retired (but broke)
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
--

>  But, the thought that "not many mechanics *can* do the math" is
>  a little scary to me.  The tiny bit of math I presented was
>  no more than the most basic high school algebra. It's only
>  marginally more dificult than calculating gas mileage...


------------------------------

From: "GaryBBB" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: grounding
Date: Sat, 3 Feb 2001 07:32:44 -0800


I mean just pull the ground from the rear and attach it to the stake and
remove the battery ground from the chassis or engine and attach it to the
other stake and you should still get lights :-)

--
Happily Retired (but broke)
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
--

>  You do mean with the positive connected to the positive lead of the
> light, correct?


------------------------------

From: "GaryBBB" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: Coil Grounding (off topic)
Date: Sat, 3 Feb 2001 07:38:05 -0800


I knew I would get at least one bite on this one, that's why I threw it out
there:-)  I don't really have a clue in it so thought at least one gear
head might make a stab at it, just for kicks :-)  Besides, I can't get the
BigBronco list due to the ORBS list thing and I'm bored :-)

--
Happily Retired (but broke)
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
--

> Trust me on this Gary, ya dont even want to "go there" on this list  :))
> Our Electrical Engineering group almost went to war over this
> topic at work
> awhile back.  I'm sure some of the double E's on the list cringed and were
> biting their tounges when they read your post. :)   Although I believe you
> are talking about 2 completly different types of "grounds" here, I aint
> touching this one!  ;)
>
> Rich


------------------------------

From: "GaryBBB" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: f250 4x4 chassis
Date: Sat, 3 Feb 2001 07:46:52 -0800


Yes!   But I have no money and don't live in Colorado :-(  I'm also
interested in.....and.....and.......

--
Happily Retired (but broke)
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
--

> anyone interested in a f250 4x4 chassis, four speed, divorced t
> case, dana 60


------------------------------

From: "GaryBBB" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: Coil grounding
Date: Sat, 3 Feb 2001 07:52:01 -0800


I guess that's why I kept insisting it was grounded to the can Azie :-)  Any
inductance that happens in between the spark events is wasted and no power
can be "Stored" in the secondary coil for the spark until the field
collapses anyway so I don't see why it wouldn't work.

--
Happily Retired (but broke)
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
--

> The coil would operate the same if it had the neg post
> going to the points(as it currently is) and had another post for the
> secondary to be grounded(there is that term again) all the time
> (permanently). A solid ground for the secondary and an intermittent
> ground for the primary side.  Is this not true??


------------------------------

From: "GaryBBB" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: Buying a rebuilt engine
Date: Sat, 3 Feb 2001 08:02:58 -0800


The main problem with Re-Manufactured engines it that they use every part
over even if they are marginal and you get things like cranks ground with
different size bearings on each throw and sometimes even cylinder bores that
are not all the same etc....

In my experience you are just as likely to get a poor mechanic/machine shop
to help you rebuild one yourself as you are to get a bad one from a Re-Man
company so choose what you feel best suits your ability and time and
finances.  A re-man will almost always be cheaper for a full rebuild than
doing it yourself if you don't have equipment to make it easy such as engine
stands, engine hoist and at least one helper (free helper that is).  If you
already have all this equipment and have the urge to learn about it and time
to spare (it's not your primary vehicle) then build one yourself :-)

--
Happily Retired (but broke)
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
--

> I'm considering United Engine, since they're probably the cheapest
> even with freight charges. What do you think?
>
> Thanks.
>
> Ben


------------------------------

From: "GaryBBB" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: Ignition Timing
Date: Sat, 3 Feb 2001 08:25:16 -0800


Alrighty Then!  Here's what happens.....the vac is there for "Driveability"
and "Economy" and nothing else.  It ensures that you can run the leanest
mixtures at idle and cruise for best economy and still have optimum timing
for WOT operation.  At idle you have the initial timing and full vac if you
use manifold which gives you about 40 degrees at idle or just initial with
ported vac.  As soon as you begin to open the throttle the ported kicks in
and at some point just above idle you have full vac or almost full vac but
it works the same as manifold so with some throttle opening you have very
little vacuum and also very little vacuum advance but once you hit cruise
and let off the gas you get nearly full vacuum again plus the engine is
running faster so there is actually more vacuum potential which typically
puts you at about 40-50 degrees advance again in cruise mode.

When you run the engine in neutral with the timing light on it what you see
is full manifold vacuum with either ported or manifold ports used because it
takes very little throttle opening to rev the engine way more than you even
want so vacuum stays high.  You have to pull the vac line from the dizzy to
test the mechanical and initial timing and you should see about 13 degrees
shift when you rev it with this disconnected but with it connected and the
vac working properly you "Should" see about 50 degrees or so......this is
normal:-)

Racing engines use about 28-36 degrees of timing and it's all in at about
3000 rpm because they run at WOT all the time, they don't need the vac to be
efficient for what they do but cruise engines need the vac for good
operation and to prevent spark knock.  A 335 series engine knocks easily so
you have to retard them most of the time unless you want to waste money on
premium gas.  As mentioned already 6-10 degrees is a good place to start for
the initial timing then make sure the mechanical advance is working which
you can test with the light and watch for the advance to show on the
flywheel etc...

As I posted already, make sure the vac works properly then with the above
settings you should not be experiencing spark knock even on cheap gas except
under very low rpm, WOT, high load conditions which is something most of us
just live with since that's the nature of the animal :-)  By reducing the
accelleration a little you can eliminate the knock alltogether.

Again, as mentioned by someone already, there is an adjustment in the vac
port which uses a 1/8" allen wrench (as I recall) which you can use to Fine
tune it but that's after you get all the other stuff working properly :-)

--
Happily Retired (but broke)
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
--

> the timing down, when I rev it to 3600 rpm the advance kicks the timing up
> to about (I say about cause the marks on the balancer do not go that high)
> 55 or 60 degrees and I get detonation. I'm losing alot of power on top end
> (won't rev over about 4200 under load, as in running down the highway)
> because of no advance


------------------------------

From: "Jerry Summerall" <k7yvz qsl.net>
Subject: Re: zip ties and hay bales, was:ENGINE WONT START
Date: Sat, 3 Feb 2001 07:54:19 -0700


Interesting. You couldn't find a Dairy farmer around here that will even
look at a small bail. I Bale all 1-ton bales. Couple thousand/year.
Someone also mentioned waist on the big or round bales? News to me. Not only
are the bigger bales easier to handle in volume but the quality is far
superior on a per weight bases.
Back to FORD trucks. Pulled my 79 F250 4x4 supercab resto project out of
the shop yesterday. Hope to get some photos before and after on my web page
soon.

73/Jerry K7YVZ
www.qsl.net/k7yvz
----- Original Message -----
From: dave Prasse <burgess4 gte.net>
To: <61-79-list ford-trucks.com>
Sent: Saturday, February 03, 2001 7:37 AM
Subject: [61-79-list] Re: zip ties and hay bales, was:ENGINE WONT START


> ----------------------------------------------------------
> Support FTE - Check out our store:
> http://www.motorhaven.com/
> ----------------------------------------------------------
>
>
>
> "Hogan, Tom (Portland)" wrote:
> >I can hereby attest that round bales are the greatest thing
> > since sliced bread!! :-)
>
> But , they do not fit in an old barn very well , and they are hard to
> feed
> to milk cows in a stanchion barn ... guess that is why we still stack
> around 3,000 small square bales/yr ...and nothing beats the exhilaration
> of stacking the last load under the rafters when it is 130 degrees under
> the tin roof w/100% humidity and no breeze ...I MISS SUMMER ....
> When is global warming gonna kick in ?
>  we roll 100 of the big round bales/yr.
>
> dave "round bales are for wimps :-)" Prasse
> Freeport , IL
>
> >
> > Tom H.
> > =============================================================
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------------------------------

From: "Bob" <xavetarx home.com>
Subject: Re: f250 4x4 chassis
Date: Sat, 3 Feb 2001 11:08:29 -0500


I'm interested in the Dana 60 front.  Which gears are in it, what condition
and where are you located?

thanks,

-bob-
79 Bronco 460 44's T18
79 Bronco 400 40's C6

anyone interested in a f250 4x4 chassis, four speed, divorced t case, dana
60
disc brake front end,



------------------------------

From: "Scott Jensen" <sjensensr worldnet.att.net>
Subject: Re: Coil Grounding
Date: Sat, 3 Feb 2001 08:09:26 -0800

<CB antenna use a "Ground Plane"  I suspect this has a similar inferance?>

Sure Gary, throw some RF in there to really confuse things..:)

Here's how I've always seen it.

Chassis ground, like we have on our trucks, computers, stereos, etc, are the difference in potential type of ground that Bill is talking about.

Earth ground is literally the ground under our feet. This is the, "ground is ground the world around," type of ground. Two ground rods stuck in the dirt to complete a circuit is using the ground as a conductor

Sometimes it's a good idea to connect chassis ground to earth ground for protection against shock and to provide a good reference.

Now the ground plane on your CB antenna is a bit different than either of the above "grounds." The type of antenna on your truck in most cases is based on the dipole. A dipole is, real basic here, two wires of the same length. One is positive and hooks to the center pin of your connector and the other is "negative," and connects to the chassis ground of your CB. Think of this as like rabbit ears on a TV, or you might have seen a ham radio guy with a wire strung between two trees and a coax cable hooked in the middle.

Now, the CB antenna you put on your truck is only half the antenna. It's the positive side. The truck is used as the negative side. Not chassis ground or earth ground, but ground plane. Because it's "close" to the length of the positive side of your antenna. This will work fine for RF in most cases. Same thing with a hand held CB radio. The little floppy antenna is the positive side, your body is used as the negative "ground plane" side.

Say you have an extra CB antenna and feel the urge to put in a base station at the house. Screw the ant. to the eaves of your house and you don't hear much, so you ground the ant. with a piece of wire to earth ground, (a very good idea anyway). It comes in better but not great. You need a better ground plane. Either buy a base station ant. or find something that can be used as a ground plane. Like the parts rig or metal garden shed, even a screen door will work.

It's already been said that ground really confuses people. You look on schematics and even the engineers get confused. For the record, earth ground is a capital E laid on its side and chassis ground is the horizontal parallel lines.

Just my 2 cents...:)

Scott
76 F100 4X4


------------------------------

Date: Sat, 03 Feb 2001 13:22:51 -0500
From: Ken Payne <kpayne ford-trucks.com>
Subject: ADMIN: Important FTE list survey


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