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Subject: 61-79-list Digest V2001 #34
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61-79-list Digest Fri, 02 Feb 2001 Volume: 2001  Issue: 034

In This Issue:
Re: right price for 77 f250?
Re: Zip ties
Re: zip ties and hay bales, was:ENGINE WONT START
Ignition Timing
Re: Zip ties
Re: Re Coil Grounding
Re: zip ties and hay bales, was:ENGINE WONT STAR
Re: Zip ties & Blood
Re: zip ties and hay bales, was:ENGINE WONT STAR T
Re: Coil grounding
Re: Ignition Timing
Re: zip ties and hay bales, was:ENGINE WONT START
Re: Engine won't stop (again)
Re: Engine won't start-update
Coil grounding
Oil sending unit
Coil grounding
Coil grounding
Re: Ignition Timing
Re: Re Coil Grounding
Re: grounding
Reluctors
Sie
Re: separation from your truck

----------------------------------------------------------------------

From: FORDTRKNUT aol.com
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 06:13:35 EST
Subject: Re: right price for 77 f250?


That price seems great!!  I live in New Jersey and saw a 1979 F350 2wd
Crewecab on the FTE classifieds about 1-2 years ago.  I called him up and we
stuck a deal.  I flew from NJ to New Orleans Airport where I saw the truck.
Needless to say it was perfect and I drove it 23-3/4 hours home straight
threw without any stops by myself.  I converted it to a 4x4 using factory
parts and added A/C.  I had pictures that some people wanted, but forgot
there address's.  If you guys read this, please send your address to me
offlist.  I'll get a CD out to you when I get a chance.  Thanks & good luck
on the crewcab!!!  Wayne Grabley

------------------------------

From: "GaryBBB" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: Zip ties
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 06:48:54 -0800


We certainly had baling wire first but I think we also had duck tape before
zip ties :-)  I got to tell you though, since I first tried them on a
vehicle I have kept a few bags around and use them in place of virtually
every kind of retainer on the truck now.  I get the colored ones so I can
color code them too :-)

--
Happily Retired (but broke)
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
--

> It was called baleing wire, I believe.
>
> Azie Magnusson
> Ardmore, Al.


------------------------------

From: "GaryBBB" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: zip ties and hay bales, was:ENGINE WONT START
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 06:55:02 -0800


Most farmers who use sqare bales use "Kick Balers" now days and one man can
do it all :-) (untill the field is done then you go back out and pick up the
bales that fell off :-))

--
Happily Retired (but broke)
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
--

> I was a student by working on the small farms around here that
> still do use
> the small bales.  Its hard to find kids to do the work anymore
> and most of the
> farmers are too old or have heart problems, so they pay well for
> a couple fields
> worth of work :)


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 04:54:41 -0800 (PST)
From: "Michael (Cut me and I'll bleed FORD Blue) Whittington" <broncoman85 excite.com>
Subject: Ignition Timing


OK I've got one for ya'll. In my 85 Bronco (Engines out of a 75 F100, to
appease the list), I've installed the Duraspark dizzy out of a '77 F100. I'm
having to run the vacuum advance unplugged because no matter how low I back
the timing down, when I rev it to 3600 rpm the advance kicks the timing up
to about (I say about cause the marks on the balancer do not go that high)
55 or 60 degrees and I get detonation. I'm losing alot of power on top end
(won't rev over about 4200 under load, as in running down the highway)
because of no advance, so do ya'll have any ideas on this? I've had the
vacuum advance hooked up on ported vacuum, the dizzy is a single port
canister and the timing is set to 13 or 14 degrees at 800 rpm idle.
This has been a thorn in my side (or in our language, baling wire under the
fingernail?) since I put the engine in the truck and would appreciate any
ideas.
Whit
77 F250 4X4 20 inchs lift 800 horse 429 44 Boggers
75 F100 460
69 F100 302
76 F250 Dual wheels 390 Tow Truck
85 Bronco 302
83 Bronco 351M (new toy)





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------------------------------

From: "GaryBBB" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: Zip ties
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 07:06:10 -0800


If you go to school to learn mechanics you will also learn that the wire
"Real" mechanics use is called "Mechanic's" wire :-)  You can buy it in
rolls at the hardware in mild steel or stainless :-)  Baling wire comes in
50# (or larger) spools and is not cost effective for us shade trees :-)  My
grand dad had a baler that used twine and the knotter was always on the
fritz so I used to sit on the twine box and tie two or three by hand, jump
off the baler on to the wagon, stack them, jump back on the baler and tie a
few more and........now that was really fun on a hot day :-)  He also had a
corn "Binder" that never seemed to get the twine tied quite right and I had
to help with that too :-)  We used to use horses to load loose hay in the
barn using 4 big hooks and a bunch of ropes and pulleys with this neat trip
mechanism too.  Those were the good old days.  Ever try jumping into a pile
of hay bales?  Hurts like heck!  Loose hay OTOH was pretty cool :-)

--
Happily Retired (but broke)
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
--

> >It was called baleing wire, I believe.
> >
> >Azie Magnusson
> >Ardmore, Al.
>
>  Oh yeah, I remember that stuff!  For some reason bailing wire
>  and I aren't on very friendly terms.


------------------------------

From: "GaryBBB" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: Re Coil Grounding
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 07:14:08 -0800


Thanks Jim for your concern :-)  Every once in a while (not too often) I
have to be put down to keep the truth flowing freely on the list but I
always learn from the exercise.  Many thanks to all who responded
knowledgeably:-)  I have a good head for mechanics but sometimes get
carried away and make an unfounded presumtion based on experience rather
than principles.  For that I appologize if I have led anyone astray.  (still
confused about the loose coil though :-))

--
Happily Retired (but broke)
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
--

>  No it isn't rocket science. It's one of the simplest (and most
>  necessary) parts of an old Ford truck...
>  And yet judging from some of the strange posts on the subject,
>  there are still some folks who don't understand how the system
>  really works, beyond "the points open and close and if the coil
>  shocks your buddy then all is O.K."
>  I'm not trying to be a smart ass or push a point to far, but I  think
> effective troubleshooting of a system is best accomplished when you
>  know how a system works... and there seems to be some disagreement
>  and confusion about just what is happening to make that spark jump
>  it's little gap.
>
>  Jim Imboden


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 07:26:03 -0600
Subject: Re: Engine won't stop (again)
From: "John LaGrone" <jlagrone ford-trucks.com>


> I guess my first question is, do you believe that the ascii
>  schematic I've drawn is correct?

I surrender. Age is catching up I guess. Yep, I was thinking the capacitor
not he condenser Sorry. I guess I got condensed too dense. Signing off this
topic with the taste of sock in my mouth.

-- John
jlagrone ford-trucks.com     <]:-) <]:-)<]:-)<]:-)<]:-)<]:-)
1979 F150 Custom, Long Wide Bed, Regular Cab, 351M, C6 (Henry)
http://www.ford-trucks.com/jlagrone/henry.home.htm
Dearborn iron rules!!!!


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 07:29:03 -0600
Subject: Re: 460 lost oil pressure-John L.
From: "John LaGrone" <jlagrone ford-trucks.com>


> The motor didn't quit, it didn't make any unusual noise either, I made a
> point to go straight home (not far away) and park it.  It did occour to me
> that the oil may have been diluted with gasoline from a stuck open needle
> valve problem in the past. Oil level was OK, I had just toped it off.

Now that you mention it, I have seen the oil diluted with gasoline once when
the fuel pump diaphragm ruptured.

-- John
jlagrone ford-trucks.com     <]:-) <]:-)<]:-)<]:-)<]:-)<]:-)
1979 F150 Custom, Long Wide Bed, Regular Cab, 351M, C6 (Henry)
http://www.ford-trucks.com/jlagrone/henry.home.htm
Dearborn iron rules!!!!


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 07:30:30 -0600
Subject: Re: Coil grounding
From: "John LaGrone" <jlagrone ford-trucks.com>


> Actually...your statement is not correct either...you only need a difference
> in potential, conductors with ample supply of free electrons and a closed
> loop to cause current to flow...

Agreed.

-- John
jlagrone ford-trucks.com     <]:-) <]:-)<]:-)<]:-)<]:-)<]:-)
1979 F150 Custom, Long Wide Bed, Regular Cab, 351M, C6 (Henry)
http://www.ford-trucks.com/jlagrone/henry.home.htm
Dearborn iron rules!!!!


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 07:32:35 -0600
Subject: Re: Engine won't stop (again)
From: "John LaGrone" <jlagrone ford-trucks.com>


> Ok, all this talk about flux and such has got my head hurting.  But here
> is a question.  It has been my experience that a wider points gap will
> give a better idle and low end grunt at the expense of top end, and that
> a narrower gap will give better topend with worse idle and low end
> grunt.  Why is that?  No, seriously.  Have others noted this or am I
> hallucinating?

Basically, the spring doesn't have time to close the points before the next
cam gets there to open them. It is similar to valve float. As you increase
the gap, you retard your timing.

-- John
jlagrone ford-trucks.com     <]:-) <]:-)<]:-)<]:-)<]:-)<]:-)
1979 F150 Custom, Long Wide Bed, Regular Cab, 351M, C6 (Henry)
http://www.ford-trucks.com/jlagrone/henry.home.htm
Dearborn iron rules!!!!


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 07:38:33 -0600
Subject: Re: Re Coil Grounding
From: "John LaGrone" <jlagrone ford-trucks.com>


> Enough of this thread, already.  This ain't rocket science.
>
> Dave Schoenberg

Thank you, Dave. Agreed.

-- John
jlagrone ford-trucks.com     <]:-) <]:-)<]:-)<]:-)<]:-)<]:-)
1979 F150 Custom, Long Wide Bed, Regular Cab, 351M, C6 (Henry)
http://www.ford-trucks.com/jlagrone/henry.home.htm
Dearborn iron rules!!!!


------------------------------

From: "Hogan, Tom (Portland)" <Tom.Hogan kla-tencor.com>
Subject: Re: zip ties and hay bales, was:ENGINE WONT STAR
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 05:52:06 -0800


> >snip<
> >   Come on John, that's rediculous. I think Zip ties have *always*
> >  been around. (-:
> >  How could primitive man ever have evolved into decent mechanics
> >  without zip ties? I'm sure they must have been one of the first
> >  tools ever invented, but they were probably made of stone or bronze
> >  or something. Personally, I can't even imagine life without them!
>
>
> Like Darrell said a couple of days ago: baling wire. You see
> all hay bales
> were rectangular, not round, and tied with wire, not string.
> Believe it or
> not a hay bale could be lifted by a single man and you could
> haul a goodly
> number in the back of your F series truck. I know there are
> some people
> still using the older bale style, but around here almost
> everyone uses the
> giant round bales.
>
> --John LaGrone
> jlagrone ford-trucks.com
> See Henry at: http://www.ford-trucks.com/jlagrone/henry.home.htm
>
And after having hauled my share of bovine bricks in the back of two
different Ford trucks (it is amazing how much they would haul if you stack
them in right) I can hereby attest that round bales are the greatest thing
since sliced bread!! :-)

Tom H.

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 08:00:05 -0600
Subject: Re: Re Coil Grounding
From: "John LaGrone" <jlagrone ford-trucks.com>


>  I'm not trying to be a smart ** or push a point to far, but I  think
> effective troubleshooting of a system is best accomplished when you
>  know how a system works... and there seems to be some disagreement
>  and confusion about just what is happening to make that spark jump
>  it's little gap.

You have provided a lot of good information in this thread, but all I really
need to know is which wires to connect to which terminals, what components
correctly make up the system, and how to adjust it to spec. Not many
mechanics can do the math you have been presenting, but they can read charts
and meters to make a truck run well. Time to go earn a living...

-- John
jlagrone ford-trucks.com     <]:-) <]:-)<]:-)<]:-)<]:-)<]:-)
1979 F150 Custom, Long Wide Bed, Regular Cab, 351M, C6 (Henry)
http://www.ford-trucks.com/jlagrone/henry.home.htm
Dearborn iron rules!!!!

------------------------------

From: "Hogan, Tom (Portland)" <Tom.Hogan kla-tencor.com>
Subject: Re: Zip ties & Blood
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 06:25:08 -0800


>
>

>   In a message dated 2/1/2001 4:25:44 PM Pacific Standard Time,
>   luminous neteze.com writes:
>
>   << I agree it's useful stuff, but somehow I always manage to hurt
>     myself with it.
>     At least it keeps my tetanus shots current...
>     >>
>
>   One thing I swear by, is if I didnt loose blood while
> fixing something, its
>   guarenteed to have to come apart again in 24 hrs.  If I
> loose a large amount
>   of blood (anything more than the common bandaid can hold
> back) Im home free
>   with no more probs.  But this has a bad side.  You must
> stop the bleeding
>   with whats on hand cuz if you stop to get stitches, your
> gonna have to open
<snip>

Stitches?  Try superglue.  Doesn't sting and instantly seals the wound.

Tom H

------------------------------

From: Bad4dFilly aol.com
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 09:45:16 EST
Subject: Re: zip ties and hay bales, was:ENGINE WONT STAR T


In a message dated 2/2/01 5:56:16 AM Pacific Standard Time,
Tom.Hogan kla-tencor.com writes:

<< Like Darrell said a couple of days ago: baling wire. You see
> all hay bales
> were rectangular, not round, and tied with wire, not string.
> Believe it or
> not a hay bale could be lifted by a single man and you could
> haul a goodly
> number in the back of your F series truck. I know there are
> some people
> still using the older bale style, but around here almost
> everyone uses the
> giant round bales. >>
I agree, bales aren't normally found nowadays w/ baling wire, at least around
here cuz we have hardly any hay fields, but a sort of twine we call baling
string, that stuff is amazing! You can use it for just about anything, and it
comes in purty colors like black, red, blue and yellow LOL On a side note, I
miss my truck, my dad <not me LOL> is redoing the front and rear brakes,
rebuilding the tranfer case, rebuilding the 4WD driveshaft as well as getting
a new tranny, so needless to say I am suffering from "Envy Seperation" LOL
Just yesterday I went to the feed store to get hay for my horse, and I could
only get 3 bales in the back of our short bed dodge ram b/c we have a tonneau
cover on it, I'm used to loading about 8 bales in my Ford *arrrrrghh
arrrrrghh arrrrgh* but hey, at least in the meantime I get A/C, Heater, good
stereo sysytem, and better gas mileage, LOL If y'all have any advice that
would help my dad please feel free to E-mail me back personally, Thanks guys!

*~*~Lisa and Envy~*~*
*~*~SIlly boys...trucks are for GIRLS!~*~*

------------------------------

From: "GaryBBB" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: Coil grounding
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 08:50:05 -0800


Which is why the term "Ground" is used for virtually everything rather than
where it actually applies, technically.  The litteral ground is the lowest
potential available so power can be sent to ground through a load with
virtually no impedance (other than the wires and load that is :-)).  Many
power distribution systems use this to good advantage.  It's just a loose
way of refering to the low end of the potential in any circuit as far as I
know.  I believe the code says that a true ground system has to have less
than 5 milliohms impedance to the actual ground to comply.

In the ignition circuit the symbols for ground are used to indicate a
common, low potential......Plane perhaps?  A source to which all low
potential terminals are attached and on a vehicle you can attach a ground to
the rear for the tail lights and the battery to the front as the "Actual"
ground for the system and anything attached in between is "Grounded" as if
it were stuck in the ground itself.  I haven't tried it but technically if
you put two 10' stakes in the ground some distance apart and attach your
tail light ground to one and the battery ground to the other you will have a
complete circuit.

CB antenna use a "Ground Plane"  I suspect this has a similar inferance?

It took me a long time to meditate on 3 phase power to understand how three
wires with 177v could make a system that is rated at 480v!??  It is the
difference in "Potential" as stated that makes it work :-)  Now if I could
just understand how taps on transformers work........or why 240 is called
single phase or......(just kidding :-))

--
Happily Retired (but broke)
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
--

> << Electricity always needs a ground to complete the circuit and move.  >>
>
> This is just to you and not the liST...but...
> Actually...your statement is not correct either...you only need a
> difference
> in potential, conductors with ample supply of free electrons and a closed
> loop to cause current to flow..."ground" is one of the most misunderstood
> terms in electrical and electronic circuits....its my area of expertise.
>
>
> Bill


------------------------------

From: "wish" <wish ford-trucks.net>
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 15:52:58 GMT
Subject: Re: Ignition Timing


>the dizzy is a single port
>canister and the timing is set to 13 or 14 degrees at 800 rpm idle.


Have you tried backing the initial timing off to somewhere around 6-10 degrees
?  Just to see if it "solves" the problem.

Also what all have you done to the motor ?

And finally, are you sure its spark that's causing your problems ?  What are
your plugs gapped at, and is the fuel system/pump adequate for those rpm's and
its needs ?

Just my $.02
wish

96 Mustang GT 5spd 4.6L
73ish 1/2ton 4x4   6.4L
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.public.iastate.edu/~wish

Ford Truck Enthusiasts
http://www.ford-trucks.com

------------------------------

From: "wish" <wish ford-trucks.net>
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 15:54:39 GMT
Subject: Re: zip ties and hay bales, was:ENGINE WONT START


>Most farmers who use sqare bales use "Kick Balers" now days and one man can

>do it all :-) (untill the field is done then you go back out and pick up the

>bales that fell off :-))
>

Or broke ... I don't see too many kicker balers around here, too many instances
of broken bales and can't get enough into the wagon ... most of them are going
round, and those that do square, well they usually have kids :)

Just my $.02
wish

96 Mustang GT 5spd 4.6L
73ish 1/2ton 4x4   6.4L
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.public.iastate.edu/~wish

Ford Truck Enthusiasts
http://www.ford-trucks.com

------------------------------

From: "GaryBBB" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: Engine won't stop (again)
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 09:01:00 -0800


I pointed this out before......the gap controls the "Dwell" which controls
the spark "Duration" and "Coil Saturation" time which is critical to the
spark intensity.  I don't recall if more dwell is points closed or open but
the longer the points are closed the more intensity you can get from the
spark which is one reason they went to "Coil on Plug" technology.

Dura spark was a serious inprovement on the points system because it could
open and close the circuits much quicker allowing more time for coil
saturation and could also electronically control the duration of the spark.
The newer after market systems actually control the spark so that it has
several peaks instead of just one which supposedly improves ignition with
poor or lean mixtures etc....

Point chatter or float is another issue and is controlled by the spring
pressure and cam shape, not the gap :-)

--
Happily Retired (but broke)
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
--

> Ok, all this talk about flux and such has got my head hurting.  But here
> is a question.  It has been my experience that a wider points gap will
> give a better idle and low end grunt at the expense of top end, and that
> a narrower gap will give better topend with worse idle and low end
> grunt.  Why is that?  No, seriously.  Have others noted this or am I
> hallucinating?


------------------------------

From: "Serian" <serian mailandnews.com>
Subject: Re: Engine won't start-update
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 10:33:41 -0500

> > return line.  Also, can I either just plug the line, or put a t-fitting
> > just before the fuel pump to connect this to?  Or am I just
> > going to have to run a return line to the tank to use this?
> > Thanks again for all the help.
>
> You should be able to plug the return port with a brass plug
> and use the pump.

While you *can* do this, plugging the return line port of a dual
action fuel pump instead of running a return line back to the
fuel tank may very well result in constant flooding of the engine.
The return line sends excess fuel that the engine does not need
at lesser throttle positions back to the tank.  If you *don't* use
the dual action pump on that large of an engine, there is the
possibility that the fuel pump you use won't supply sufficient
fuel to the engine when you open up all four barrels of the carb.



------------------------------

From: "Azie L. Magnusson" <maggie11 HiWAAY.net>
Subject: Coil grounding
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 09:31:56 -0600

Bill R. writes:  >>..."ground" is one of the most misunderstood
terms in electrical and electronic circuits....its my area of expertise.<<

You are correct in that "Ground" is misused by us.  Usually in electrical
and electronics both when the term "ground" is used it is in reference to
the negative side of any circuit and could in fact be "Positive" in relation
to a real ground.  We're not scientific in most of our analogies, so I'm
sure most of us will continue in our set ways of referencing the negative
side of any circuit as "ground".  I think most of us realize what we mean,
and that most of us know that technically we are incorrect when we use
the term this way.


Azie Magnusson
Ardmore, Al.


------------------------------

From: "Azie L. Magnusson" <maggie11 HiWAAY.net>
Subject: Oil sending unit
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 09:34:44 -0600

Karl S. writes:  >>I haven't done much work on this truck and wondered if someone could tell me
where the sender is located, I allready have a mechanical gauge on a flex
tube that I can use to check it.<<

Right smack in the rear middle of the top of the block behind the intake
manifold..  It sticks straight up and the cowl is awfully close to it. A single
wire on it.


Azie Magnusson
Ardmore, Al.


------------------------------

From: "Azie L. Magnusson" <maggie11 HiWAAY.net>
Subject: Coil grounding
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 09:51:53 -0600

Dave S. writes:  >>the point is that the coil
secondary does NOT ground to the case or the block.  <<

On a points equipped vehicle:  When the points are closed the ohm
meter shows NO resistance between the negative side of the coil
and the neg battery terminal or the block..  When I disconnect the
coil and measure from the neg post to the hivoltage(coil wire) port,
I read around 16,000-18,000 ohms..  It isn't grounded all the time,
but to operate(create a spark) there has to be a complete circle
(circuit).  The coil would operate the same if it had the neg post
going to the points(as it currently is) and had another post for the
secondary to be grounded(there is that term again) all the time
(permanently). A solid ground for the secondary and an intermittent
ground for the primary side.  Is this not true??  Have I really
forgotten that much since I attended trade school back in the
mid 50's??  I realize that was AC and line transformers I was
studying, but the points opening and closing effectively creates
an AC voltage - just a varying frequency..  Right??

Azie Magnusson
Ardmore, Al.


------------------------------

From: "Azie L. Magnusson" <maggie11 HiWAAY.net>
Subject: Coil grounding
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 09:58:25 -0600

Dave S. writes:  >>This electrical charge is then conducted from the bar, <<

Naw...  The secondary has two wire ends, and one of those wire ends
is connected to the hivoltage port(coil wire). The core(bar) just sits
there and has no electrical connections to it.

>>Enough of this thread, already.  This ain't rocket science.<<

Naw..  I'm trying to learn something here, and I could care less about
those rockets. I'm working on old Ford Trucks.

Azie Magnusson
Ardmore, Al.


------------------------------

From: SevnD2 aol.com
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 11:06:29 EST
Subject: Re: Ignition Timing


In a message dated 02/02/2001 7:55:09 AM Eastern Standard Time,
broncoman85 excite.com writes:

<<  I'm
having to run the vacuum advance unplugged because no matter how low I back
the timing down, when I rev it to 3600 rpm the advance kicks the timing up
to about (I say about cause the marks on the balancer do not go that high)
55 or 60 degrees and I get detonation. >>

There is supposed to be an internal limiter under the advance plate inside
the distributor. The limiter uses a piece of rubber on a small finger that
points up and will limit how far the centrifugal weights can advance at
higher rpms. This is something to check out. It is possible this limiter is
broken off or not lined up properly. If so, there is no telling how far the
centrifugal advance can go. Add the vacuum advance with the unlimited
centrifugal advance and the results are easy to spot with a timing light.

If the centrifugal advance looks as though it does have a limiter in place
and working, check to see if the rubber piece is there. You can install a
piece on it to limit its movement some. The amount of spring pressure has an
effect on what rpm range this advance comes into play. This is not something
to mess with or just guess at. Leave it alone if the springs are there and
attached properly.

Rollie



------------------------------

Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 08:24:48 -0800
From: Dennis Pearson <dpearson ctc.edu>
Subject: Re: Re Coil Grounding




John LaGrone wrote:
>

>
> > Enough of this thread, already.  This ain't rocket science.
> >
> > Dave Schoenberg
>
> Thank you, Dave. Agreed.
>
Why?  Because you are not interested and/or already understand it?  I
wade through/cruise by tons of postings that don't interest me.  Over
the last six months, with all the postings on political issues, etc., I
was wondering what was going on here...?  At least this thread is
directly relevant to working on my Ford truck...That's why God invented
the delete button...and, by the way, the remote control...


--
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://counterculture.ws
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://ctc.edu/~dpearson/popcult.html
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://home.att.net/~dlpearson/lyrics.htm

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 08:31:30 -0800
From: Dennis Pearson <dpearson ctc.edu>
Subject: Re: grounding




GaryBBB wrote:
 I haven't tried it but technically if
> you put two 10' stakes in the ground some distance apart and attach your
> tail light ground to one and the battery ground to the other you will have a
> complete circuit.
>
You do mean with the positive connected to the positive lead of the
light, correct?

--
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://counterculture.ws
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://ctc.edu/~dpearson/popcult.html
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://home.att.net/~dlpearson/lyrics.htm

------------------------------

From: "Azie L. Magnusson" <maggie11 HiWAAY.net>
Subject: Reluctors
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 10:37:42 -0600

Rich writes:  >>"In operation the PMG sends alternating current to
the module, with the current changing from positive to negative each
time one of the gear teeth on the armature passes the permanent
magnet in the coil. <<

The reluctor is nothing more than a star shaped piece of steel.
The # of star "Points" depending on the # of cylinders being fed.
How does it create anything by just passing by the magnetized coil
(magnetic pickup)??  I realize that the reluctor is grounded thru the
shaft in the dist and that the coil(magnetic pickup) is energized
(electrically charged), but that doesn't explain anything to me..  I went
to electronics school while in the Military and studied Electronic
Countrermeasures(ECM) equipment, but that was during the latter
days of vacuum tubes and semiconductore are a mystery to me.
The principals of the magnetic field creating electricity, however,
should remain the same, and I'm in the dark on this one.  (Some on
this list think I'm on the dark altogether, I think.)

How about the "Hall effect" distributors in some vehicles being
priduced today??  How do they work??  I've examined several, but
the principal of operation is beyond me.


Azie Magnusson
Ardmore, Al.


------------------------------

From: "Azie L. Magnusson" <maggie11 HiWAAY.net>
Subject: Sie
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 11:17:13 -0600

Bill R. gives us this site:  >>http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.howstuffworks.com/ignition-system.htm<<

That is a great site..  How in the world did you come across it??
I bookmarked the home page, so I can try to learn myself and teach
some others about things that interest us. Illustrations are great
to use..


Azie Magnusson
Ardmore, Al.


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 11:48:33 -0600
Subject: Re: separation from your truck
From: "John LaGrone" <jlagrone ford-trucks.com>


> so needless to say I am suffering from "Envy Seperation" LOL

I feel for you, Lisa. I am banned from driving at the moment (eye surgery).
I at least get to sit in the driveway and run Henry's engine every couple of
days.

-- John
jlagrone ford-trucks.com     <]:-) <]:-)<]:-)<]:-)<]:-)<]:-)
1979 F150 Custom, Long Wide Bed, Regular Cab, 351M, C6 (Henry)
http://www.ford-trucks.com/jlagrone/henry.home.htm
Dearborn iron rules!!!!

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 02 Feb 2001 11:53:00 -0600
Subject: Re: Re Coil Grounding
From: "John LaGrone" <jlagrone ford-trucks.com>


>> > Enough of this thread, already.  This ain't rocket science.
>> >
>> > Dave Schoenberg
>>
>> Thank you, Dave. Agreed.
>>
>  Why?  Because you are not interested and/or already understand it?  I
> wade through/cruise by tons of postings that don't interest me.  Over
> the last six months, with all the postings on political issues, etc., I
> was wondering what was going on here...?  At least this thread is
> directly relevant to working on my Ford truck...That's why God invented
> the delete button...and, by the way, the remote control...

Some tempers were getting too hot to handle IMHO.

-- John
jlagrone ford-trucks.com     <]:-) <]:-)<]:-)<]:-)<]:-)<]:-)
1979 F150 Custom, Long Wide Bed, Regular Cab, 351M, C6 (Henry)
http://www.ford-trucks.com/jlagrone/henry.home.htm
Dearborn iron rules!!!!


------------------------------

From: JUMPINFORD aol.com
Date: Fri, 2 Feb 2001 13:14:17 EST
Subject: Re: separation from your truck


In a message dated 2/2/2001 9:58:14 AM Pacific Standard Time,
jlagrone ford-trucks.com writes:

<< so needless to say I am suffering from "Envy Seperation" LOL

I feel for you, Lisa. I am banned from driving at the moment (eye surgery).
I at least get to sit in the driveway and run Henry's engine every couple of
days.

-- John >>

Thats not to bad.  Park your baby and then listen to at least 2 people a day
ask how its comin and when is it gonna be wheelin again.  After 3 months you
go numb, but at 6 months, with everything paid for, but countless other
projects in your way, the feelings come back, mixed with a high amount of
anxiety, and then you get the unquentiable thirst for a lil off road action,
that you know your Mustang cant handle so you find yourself instagating a
chase seen in the parking lot of the local casino searchin for that rush that
you get when your flyin in the desert, hit a jump and know ya got air cuz the
ride just got smoother than grandmas cadilac but it doesnt work and you still
got the urge and you try to calm them by watchin old video of the truck in ....


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