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Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 14:11:40 -0500 (EST)
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61-79-list Digest Tue, 21 Nov 2000 Volume: 2000  Issue: 344

In This Issue:
Re: 352 vs 351w compatability vs 360 or 390
need recipe for a 460
Re: Small Block V8 for my 65F100
clutch replacement
Re: 429/460 genesis
Stroke
Re: D60 brake job followup (long)
Re: clutch replacement
Re: D60 brake job followup (long)
Re: [Fordnatics] 352 vs 351W compatibility
Re: [Re: clutch replacement]
Yet another reason I drive old vehicles...
Re: clutch replacement
Re: clutch replacement]
Re: Yet another reason I drive old vehicles...
Re: [Re: Yet another reason I drive old vehicles...]
Re: Yet another reason I drive old vehicles...
Re: [Re: Yet another reason I drive old vehicles...]

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 18:03:19 -0800
From: CLAUDE JONES <gizmo phonewave.net>
Subject: Re: 352 vs 351w compatability vs 360 or 390

It's been awhile since I posted but I have to comment on this,
 I'm no pro when it comes to what is the best engines or comparisions
of torque and all that, BUT I personally am very happy with my 352
compared with the 360 or 390.  I have over 180,000 miles on it.
Compression is steady at 40 psi when warmed up (65 psi at start up) and
I get 14 mpg on the highway 12 mpg in town.  All this with the NP435
toploader and Dana 60 with 4.10s
It has Plenty of torque!!!  With the right set up its just as good as a
390! period!
 Sooooo don't junk your 352's give them to me, I'll be more than happy
to take them off your hands. LoL  ;o)

C Jones (another CJ lol)
1966 F250 CC/CS
Fallon, Nv


------------------------------

From: Critterwoods aol.com
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 21:43:11 EST
Subject: need recipe for a 460


Friends,
  I have to re-build my 460. Can anyone give me a good recipe for an engine
with decent power, that still gets manageable fuel mileage. It has to run on
cheap gas. I am putting it in my 78 4x4. It has 355 gears and a c-6
transmission. I need to know what kind of pistons and head work. Any info
will help. Thanks.



------------------------------

From: BRussAZ aol.com
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 22:13:46 EST
Subject: Re: Small Block V8 for my 65F100

Greetings All,
Awhile back I indicated the wish to install a 300 in my beloved 65 F100.  I
am thinking now a good replacement for the tired 240 would be a SB V8 with a
4-speed.  I have heard a lot about the 302 but not working with Fords in my
younger years, I am unfamiliar with engine/trans swaps.  My truck is Long Bed
with factory 240/3-speed.  If I got the right motor mounts, would a SB
V8/4-speed fit without drive shaft modifications?
Any recommendations?
thanx in advance.

Bill


------------------------------

Date: 21 Nov 00 22:39:25 PST
From: Ryan Sturz <68classic usa.net>
Subject: clutch replacement

Greetings,

I am new to the list and to Ford trucks and would like to take the opportunity
to ask a question while I'm introducing myself.

My wife and I purchased a 1977 F250 two weeks ago.  According to the emissions
test papers the truck has a 5.8 backed by a manual 4-speed transmission (the
part with the 4 speeds I was able to verify :o))

Anyway, the clutch was slipping badly when I drove the truck home and went
totally out on my way back from the parts store two days later after I had
picked up a CenterforceI pressure plate with the disk and TO bearing.  Now,
I'm new to replacing clutches and even though I do have a rough idea of how to
proceed I would be grateful for any pointers or hints.  For instance, do I
have to drop the tranny all the way or can I just slide it back a little while
I work on the clutch (2-wheel drive)?  Do I have to disconnect the shifter
linkage from inside the cabin or from underneath?  Do I have to drain the
fluid before I pull the trans?  Does the manual trannie have a dipstick?
Where's the hole to refill it?  Can I resurface the flywheel myself or do I
have to take it in?  While I'm under there, what's the difference between the
big block and the small block bellhousing bolt pattern (I'd like to try to
determine if thats an M or a W block)?  I understand I just have to pay
attention to aligning the disc, the rest will automatically drop into place?

Thanks in advance for all the help anyone could offer and sorry for the
somewhat lengthy post.

Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours, I'll be spending mine under the truck.

Best regards,

Ryan Sturz
'77 F250
'70 Skylark Custom Convertible

____________________________________________________________________
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------------------------------

Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 02:48:34 -0500
From: George Selby <gselby4x4 earthlink.net>
Subject: Re: 429/460 genesis

At 08:35 PM 11/21/00 -0500, you wrote:
I think I erred a little here. The Buick, Olds, and Pontiac V8s were new in
1967, but I think they were only 430 cubes then. I think the 455 versions
and the Chevy 454 showed up in 1971 when compression dropped.


Just a little. The 454 was definitely around in 1970 (I think that was the
1st year,) as that was the year of my personal favorite muscle car (sorry
guys) the 1970 Chevelle 454 SS.

Here's the scoop from my book American Supercar, by Roger Huntington, HP
Books; beginning year is first year I could find a reference to that
engine, displacement upgrades are the first year the engine was put in a
mid-size car (Torino or Chevelle size)

Pontiac: had 326, 389 pre 1965; 400 started in 1967 (extensively reworked
version of 389); 455 in 71.

Olds: 330 (1963-4), 400 (1965), 455 in 70

Buick: old 401 (nailhead) ended 1966, new 400 started 1967; 455 in 70

Chevy: 396 started 1965.5; 427 in 1968; 454 in 70

      Ford: 429 (385 series) started 1968 (in 1969 model full-size cars,
started in 1970 in Torinos)  1970 is first year 460 is listed as an option
for  trucks in my Haynes Techbook on Ford engines.


George Selby
78 F-150 4x4 400 4 spd
86 Nissan 300ZX
gselby4x4 earthlink.net
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.usedcarsandparts.com


------------------------------

From: "Azie L. Magnusson" <maggie11 HiWAAY.net>
Subject: Stroke
Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 16:46:19 -0600


I just sent an E mail to this list agreeing that the stroke of a 351C was 3.35"..

Not Correct..

All Ford 351's have a stroke of 3.5" as well as the 352 FE.

A senior moment there....  Sorry

Azie Magnusson
Ardmore, Al.


------------------------------

Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 07:52:10 -0800 (PST)
From: Eric Finn <ecfinn yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: D60 brake job followup (long)

Wow!  Thanks for all the great responses.  First let me wish everyone a
happy and safe holiday weekend.  Traveling will be nuts out there so take
it easy folks.  I want you all back here on Monday.  (Besides I could use
the help.)  <VBG>

I'll try to summarize what you've said and then you can let me know if I'm
still missing something or I've got it confused etc.  I'll start with the
easier to understand points and move on from there.

- As far as the spring kit, the consensus seems to be to replace it while
I'm in there doing the other things as long as the parts don't still look
new.  If they look ok I'll probably reuse them and return the kit.

- To answer your question Eric W., it appears that a standard socket will
not work.  You'll need a special tool that's made just for this purpose.
Its a rounded corner 2 9/16" socket.  Also note that its a 3/4" drive.
I'm not sure that this socket can be used on all D60 rears however.  I
thought I heard a while back that some of the earlier models used a 2 3/8"
nut.  I could be wrong however.  I would pull one of the outer nuts first
to check it first before buying the tool though.  If you're interested the
tool I bought was an OTC (part # 1928) and I got it at Napa for $17.

- The drum is measured by the inside diameter and should be turned by a
shop who will determine if there is enough metal left to justify turning
them.

- The hub seal has to be replaced in order to replace the bearings since
I'll trash it while taking it out.  No big deal but now I've got to make
sure I get new seals when I get the rest of the parts.

- Its fine to use the adapter for the torque wrench as long as the socket
is still centered in the same location on the wratchet.  Which makes sense
if I'd actually thought about it.  :-)  I was just concerned that the
adapters would allow some slippage in the connections and possibly skew
the readings.

- The choice on brand of bearings seems to be choose whatever you're
comfortable with.  I think I'll stick with Timken since they were in there
already and I can easily match up the part #'s to ensure I've gotten the
correct bearings.

- First I think I need to confirm that I'm referring to the correct
bearings (inner vs. outer).  When I say inner bearings I'm referring to
the ones closest to the differential and the last ones off the spindle.
The outer bearings are the ones held in with the retaining nut and the
ones that come out before you can remove the drum.  Is that correct?
Assuming this is correct I'll use these terms below.

- The spindle (apparently I had the correct term in the first place... who
knew?)  has some surface markings on it.  They mainly seem to be beneath
where the bearings ride.  The surface up next to the brake backing plate
seems to be ok.  I'm assuming that's where the seal rides correct?  From
Azie's comments since its not bent or rusted through I should be ok as
long as the race doesn't spin right?  I think I might have found one of my
problems however.  Should there be a race mounted on the spindle itself or
is the race attached to the inside of the inner bearings?  Is it possible
the race came out with the drum?  So in terms of location going from the
brake backing plate (where the pads are mounted the order should be seal,
race, then inner bearing correct?

- Now onto the confusing part, the bearings themselves.  The set of outer
bearings that I looked at did not look discolored or pitted in any way.
From your descriptions then I'll probably reuse them if all else checks
out ok.  That's good news.  Maybe this won't cost me a ton of $$$.  I need
to lightly pack the bearings in grease so they don't burn before they get
coated in diff lube.  Does it matter what type of grease I use for this?

- What type of gear oil goes in the rear since it seems I need to check
the level?  I know this has been asked before but I never paid attention
since I only had a 9" rear in my Bronco.  How do I tell if its a limited
slip?  If it is LS then I need different gear oil correct?

- Apparently I can remove the inner bearing from the drum by tapping it
out gently, which will push out the rear seal and the bearing.

- Neither side leaked out any gear oil when I removed the axle.  Of course
I was only working on one side at a time so it was higher than the
opposite side when I pulled it.  Shouldn't there at least be some residue
or something?  I guess you just check the level with the truck sitting on
a level surface and pull the plug on the diff cover correct?  How high
should the level be?  Up to the bottom of the plug?

- When I removed the axle shafts themselves they had some surface rust on
them about midway between the ends.  Is that a problem or just further
indication that the diff is low on fluid?  Also there seemed to be some
'gunk' on the splines of the axle shaft after I removed them.  Could that
just be from the surfaces inside the axle tube or should I pull the diff
cover and look at the gears?

- Can I reuse the axle shaft gasket that mounts behind the 8 bolts to the
brake drum or should I purchase new ones to use once I'm finished?

- I just want to confirm how the whole system works on these brakes.  The
gear oil runs out from the diff through the axle tube and inside the inner
portion of the brake drum.  Both sets of bearings ride on the spindle in
the diff oil.  There are seals at the front and back of the brake drum
that keep the diff oil from leaking out the front or back of the drum.

- I think based upon all the questions I've had I'll try to do a decent
writeup and get it posted somewhere for ya'll to review.  I've taken
enough of your time so far that I have to think it would be useful to
someone else who's new to the full-floating axles like myself.  Besides
it'll cut down on these types of question in the future.  :-)  I think I'm
decidedly in the negative with this group so far so I'd like to give
something back instead of always taking.

- Scott, I think the torque specs would be really helpful at this point.
I may or may not have the correct ones in my various manuals.  It would be
helpful to compare them nonetheless seeing as how we've had disagreement
lately on torque specs for the main bearings in the 351M.  See I do pay
attention ;-)

- BTW, Scott, why do I need to replace the locking washer between the
bearing nuts?  Can't I just rebend the tabs around the nuts after
re-installing them?

Wow I can't believe how long this post turned out to be.  Sorry about
that.  If you're still reading at this point I greatly appreciate it!

Later,
Eric Finn (getting more long-winded everyday it seems...)
'78 Bronco "The Beast" (Project still in progress)
'79 F-350 4x4 "Fred"

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------------------------------

From: "Garrett Nelson" <garrettnelson writeme.com>
Subject: Re: clutch replacement
Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 11:22:12 -0600


Well when I replaced the clutch behind my 390 I pulled the engine. I would think that to replace the clutch with the engine installed, you will have to completely remove the tranny. There should be some kind of metal plate over the shifter. Removing that should give you access to the shift linkage. I would probably remove the shifter to get it out of the way.

Be sure you get an alignment tool for the clutch disk. There are 2 styles, a universal metal one with lots of parts, and a one piece plastic one made just for your clutch. Either one will work, the plastic one will probably be cheaper but may be harder to find. I got the universal set, that way you can use it on other vehicles as well.

Replacement is pretty straight-forward. Just follow the directions that are included. A shop manual with torque specs for the bolts is a good idea as well. You may wish to invest in some new pressure plate bolts, they are not that expensive and are good insurance. Get some good ARP or similar ones that are meant for pressure plate use.

Manual trannies do not have dipsticks, there is usually a plug you remove to add fluid and check the level. You should not have to drain the fluid from the tranny for this, but now would be a good time to check it.

Have a machine shop surface the flywheel. Oh, and try bolting the clutch to the flywheel to see how the disc fits before you have the flywheel machined. Some flywheels need to me machined for extra clearance in the center for the Centerforce disc to fit properly. This should be covered in the instructions that came with the clutch.

Wise choice on the Centerforce by the way, I have one in my truck too.

Good luck, and welcome to the list!



Garrett www.1966ford.com







 ----- Original Message -----
 From: Ryan Sturz
 To: 61-79-list ford-trucks.com
 Sent: Wednesday, November 22, 2000 12:39 AM
 Subject: [61-79-list] clutch replacement


 Greetings,

 I am new to the list and to Ford trucks and would like to take the opportunity
 to ask a question while I'm introducing myself.

 My wife and I purchased a 1977 F250 two weeks ago.  According to the emissions
 test papers the truck has a 5.8 backed by a manual 4-speed transmission (the
 part with the 4 speeds I was able to verify :o))

 Anyway, the clutch was slipping badly when I drove the truck home and went
 totally out on my way back from the parts store two days later after I had
 picked up a CenterforceI pressure plate with the disk and TO bearing.  Now,
 I'm new to replacing clutches and even though I do have a rough idea of how to
 proceed I would be grateful for any pointers or hints.  For instance, do I
 have to drop the tranny all the way or can I just slide it back a little while
 I work on the clutch (2-wheel drive)?  Do I have to disconnect the shifter
 linkage from inside the cabin or from underneath?  Do I have to drain the
 fluid before I pull the trans?  Does the manual trannie have a dipstick?
 Where's the hole to refill it?  Can I resurface the flywheel myself or do I
 have to take it in?  While I'm under there, what's the difference between the
 big block and the small block bellhousing bolt pattern (I'd like to try to
 determine if thats an M or a W block)?  I understand I just have to pay
 attention to aligning the disc, the rest will automatically drop into place?

 Thanks in advance for all the help anyone could offer and sorry for the
 somewhat lengthy post.

 Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours, I'll be spending mine under the truck.

 Best regards,

 Ryan Sturz
 '77 F250
 '70 Skylark Custom Convertible




------------------------------

From: "Bob" <xavetarx home.com>
Subject: Re: D60 brake job followup (long)
Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 12:25:54 -0500

Eric,

I reused the axle shaft gasket that mounts behind the 8 bolt, many times and
have no leaks yet *fingers crossed*  same with the lock washer.  As long as
there are tabs still in the proper location, you're good to go.

-bob-




------------------------------

Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 13:08:42 -0600
From: barron <mustangalley adiis.net>
Subject: Re: [Fordnatics] 352 vs 351W compatibility

The small block engines (289, 302, 351W and 351C) use a bell housing
that is about 3/4 deeper than the FE bell housing.  The transmission
bolt pattern is the same on both bell housings.  As long as the FE
transmission has the standard small diameter, 10 spline input shaft
(should be the case as the big diameter input shaft was used only on the
427 and 428 CJ engines as far as I know), you can use the transmission
behind a small block if you use the special long pilot bearing Ford had
designed just for this reason.  I believe that this bearing was designed
for use in trucks that required a special shorter case transmission so
that only one transmission would be needed on the production line.  A
Ford Dealer or a good part store should be able to find a listing for
this bearing.  If you do not use this bearing, there is a chance that
the end of the input shaft may not fit into the pilot bearing.

I know that this set up works as I ran a 390 top loader behind a 289 in
a 65 Mustang for a number of years.

Regards

Kim Barron

------------------------------

Date: 22 Nov 00 10:03:34 PST
From: Ryan Sturz <68classic usa.net>
Subject: Re: [Re: clutch replacement]

Garrett,

Thanks for the hints, they already make me feel more comfortable about
crawling under that thing tomorrow.  My Centerforce didn't come with
incredibly comprehensive instructions, only some cautions regarding certain
Chevy applications...

Thanks again,

Ryan in SoCal

>
> Well when I replaced the clutch behind my 390 I pulled the engine. I would
think that to replace the clutch with the engine installed, you will have to
completely remove the tranny. There should be some kind of metal plate over
the shifter. Removing that should give you access to the shift linkage. I
would probably remove the shifter to get it out of the way.
>
> Be sure you get an alignment tool for the clutch disk. There are 2 styles, a
universal metal one with lots of parts, and a one piece plastic one made just
for your clutch. Either one will work, the plastic one will probably be
cheaper but may be harder to find. I got the universal set, that way you can
use it on other vehicles as well.
>
> Replacement is pretty straight-forward. Just follow the directions that are
included. A shop manual with torque specs for the bolts is a good idea as
well. You may wish to invest in some new pressure plate bolts, they are not
that expensive and are good insurance. Get some good ARP or similar ones that
are meant for pressure plate use.
>
> Manual trannies do not have dipsticks, there is usually a plug you remove to
add fluid and check the level. You should not have to drain the fluid from the
tranny for this, but now would be a good time to check it.
>
> Have a machine shop surface the flywheel. Oh, and try bolting the clutch to
the flywheel to see how the disc fits before you have the flywheel machined.
Some flywheels need to me machined for extra clearance in the center for the
Centerforce disc to fit properly. This should be covered in the instructions
that came with the clutch.
>
> Wise choice on the Centerforce by the way, I have one in my truck too.
>
> Good luck, and welcome to the list!
>
>
>
> Garrett www.1966ford.com


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------------------------------

From: "Southerland, Rich" <rsouther alldata.com>
Subject: Yet another reason I drive old vehicles...
Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 10:15:40 -0800

Goin' to Grandmas house for the holiday.  She has a '99 Jeep Grand Cherokee.
Uses it for business and lives in the hills, so at 35K, it's time for
brakes.  Just got back from a visit with my smiling Daimler/Chrysler
counterperson and after plunking down $254.29, I walked (limped, really)
away with TWO sets of brake pads.  That's it.  $250 just for pads.  Glad
it's not me paying for it!

FTE content: Drove my '77 E150 (which I could replace practically every
brake component on the truck for that $250) to pick up the parts


------------------------------

From: "Randy Cannon" <rcannon ussynthetic.com>
Subject: Re: clutch replacement
Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 11:15:02 -0700

I have replaced clutches both by removing the engine, and by removing the
trans.

The nice thing about removing the engine is you get to spend more time on
your feet, as opposed to on your back under the truck. (personal preference)

However, it is a generally simpler process to remove the trans., in terms of
getting everything disconnected and out of the way.  The newer the truck,
the truer this becomes, as you find more and more stuff on the engine to
disconnect and get out of the way.

As for alignment tools:  Although, I generally adhere to the "use the right
tool for the right job" philosophy, I have never used an actual "alignment
tool", I just use a screwdriver handle.  Just tighten the pressure plate
bolts tight enough to hold the disc in place, put the screwdriver handle
through the disc center to the crankshaft center, and use the leverage at
the tip of the screwdriver to move the disc until it's lined up.  I just
eyeball the alignment and tighten up the pressure plate bolts.  Hope that
made some sense.  In any case, if you like buying tools, then get the
alignment tool, but if your looking to save a buck, this has been a
trouble-free procedure for me.

-Randy
'79 F250 Supercab, 460

-----Original Message-----
Garrett Nelson

Well when I replaced the clutch behind my 390 I pulled the engine. I would
think that to replace the clutch with the engine installed, you will have to
completely remove the tranny.
Be sure you get an alignment tool for the clutch disk.

----- Original Message -----
Ryan Sturz

 Greetings,

 I am new to the list and to Ford trucks and would like to take the
opportunity
 to ask a question while I'm introducing myself.

 My wife and I purchased a 1977 F250 two weeks ago.  According to the
emissions
 test papers the truck has a 5.8 backed by a manual 4-speed transmission
(the
 part with the 4 speeds I was able to verify :o))

 Anyway, the clutch was slipping badly when I drove the truck home and went
 totally out on my way back from the parts store two days later after I had
 picked up a CenterforceI pressure plate with the disk and TO bearing.
Now,
 I'm new to replacing clutches and even though I do have a rough idea of
how to
 proceed I would be grateful for any pointers or hints.  For instance, do I
 have to drop the tranny all the way or can I just slide it back a little
while
 I work on the clutch (2-wheel drive)?  Do I have to disconnect the shifter
 linkage from inside the cabin or from underneath?  Do I have to drain the
 fluid before I pull the trans?  Does the manual trannie have a dipstick?
 Where's the hole to refill it?  Can I resurface the flywheel myself or do
I
 have to take it in?  While I'm under there, what's the difference between
the
 big block and the small block bellhousing bolt pattern (I'd like to try to
 determine if thats an M or a W block)?  I understand I just have to pay
 attention to aligning the disc, the rest will automatically drop into
place?

 Thanks in advance for all the help anyone could offer and sorry for the
 somewhat lengthy post.

 Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours, I'll be spending mine under the
truck.

 Best regards,

 Ryan Sturz
 '77 F250
 '70 Skylark Custom Convertible



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------------------------------

Date: 22 Nov 00 10:40:33 PST
From: Ryan Sturz <68classic usa.net>
Subject: Re: clutch replacement]

Randy,

I think I know what you mean, I'm sure it'll be totally clear when I look at
it tomorrow.  I agree on the standing up part, lying face down in a dirty
parking lot has over time lost its charms to me as well but the engine seems
to be doing fine at this point so no need to pull it.

Saving a buck sounds good, I'm not hoping to re-use a clutch alignment tool
again anytime soon (although I've been told it's only two bucks or so), I'll
see how it works out and if I feel confident enough to "eyeball" the disc
alignment properly.

By the way, does anybody by chance have the torque specs for the pressure
plate/ bellhousing handy?

Thanks,

Ryan in SoCal

> I have replaced clutches both by removing the engine, and by removing the
> trans.
>
> The nice thing about removing the engine is you get to spend more time on
> your feet, as opposed to on your back under the truck. (personal
preference)
>
> However, it is a generally simpler process to remove the trans., in terms
of
> getting everything disconnected and out of the way.  The newer the truck,
> the truer this becomes, as you find more and more stuff on the engine to
> disconnect and get out of the way.
>
> As for alignment tools:  Although, I generally adhere to the "use the right
> tool for the right job" philosophy, I have never used an actual "alignment
> tool", I just use a screwdriver handle.  Just tighten the pressure plate
> bolts tight enough to hold the disc in place, put the screwdriver handle
> through the disc center to the crankshaft center, and use the leverage at
> the tip of the screwdriver to move the disc until it's lined up.  I just
> eyeball the alignment and tighten up the pressure plate bolts.  Hope that
> made some sense.  In any case, if you like buying tools, then get the
> alignment tool, but if your looking to save a buck, this has been a
> trouble-free procedure for me.
>
> -Randy
>  '79 F250 Supercab, 460


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------------------------------

From: "Don Thurlow" <don.thurlow greenbaynet.com>
Subject: Re: Yet another reason I drive old vehicles...
Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 12:51:02 -0600

Ouch.  I think i paid that for my rotors pads and drums..
and even the bad caliper i dropped from my garage roof hehe

-Don and then some lunch and beer
----- Original Message -----
From: "Southerland, Rich" <rsouther alldata.com>
To: "'ford list'" <61-79-list ford-trucks.com>
Sent: Wednesday, November 22, 2000 12:15 PM
Subject: [61-79-list] Yet another reason I drive old vehicles...


> Goin' to Grandmas house for the holiday.  She has a '99 Jeep Grand
Cherokee.
> Uses it for business and lives in the hills, so at 35K, it's time for
> brakes.  Just got back from a visit with my smiling Daimler/Chrysler
> counterperson and after plunking down $254.29, I walked (limped, really)
> away with TWO sets of brake pads.  That's it.  $250 just for pads.  Glad
> it's not me paying for it!
>
> FTE content: Drove my '77 E150 (which I could replace practically every
> brake component on the truck for that $250) to pick up the parts
>
> =============================================================
> To  unsubscribe:   www.ford-trucks.com/mailinglist.html#item3
> Please remove this footer when replying.
>


------------------------------

Date: 22 Nov 00 11:03:00 PST
From: Ryan Sturz <68classic usa.net>
Subject: Re: [Re: Yet another reason I drive old vehicles...]

Don,

What were you doing with a brake caliper on your garage roof? :o)))

Just curious...

Ryan in CoCal

> Ouch.  I think i paid that for my rotors pads and drums..
> and even the bad caliper i dropped from my garage roof hehe


____________________________________________________________________
Get free email and a permanent address at http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.amexmail.com/?A=1

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 14:05:16 -0500
From: "William D. Poudrier" <vze259s7 verizon.net>
Subject: Re: Yet another reason I drive old vehicles...

How do I politely say you got shafted!  Brake pads front/rear on
www.wrenchhead.com are about $35.  per set.

I buy lots-o-parts on line and think that I get a relatively good deal
Example:  Oxy sensors for my 1987 Lincoln under $30.00
Ignition switch $12 +,  Timing set $25 and so on.

A full set of gaskets for my 79 F150 351M is $ 59  (Felpro)

Bill



At 10:15 AM 11/22/00 -0800, you wrote:
>Goin' to Grandmas house for the holiday.  She has a '99 Jeep Grand Cherokee.
>Uses it for business and lives in the hills, so at 35K, it's time for
>brakes.  Just got back from a visit with my smiling Daimler/Chrysler
>counterperson and after plunking down $254.29, I walked (limped, really)
>away with TWO sets of brake pads.  That's it.  $250 just for pads.  Glad
>it's not me paying for it!
>
>FTE content: Drove my '77 E150 (which I could replace practically every
>brake component on the truck for that $250) to pick up the parts
>
>=============================================================
>To  unsubscribe:   www.ford-trucks.com/mailinglist.html#item3
>Please remove this footer when replying.



------------------------------

From: "Don Thurlow" <don.thurlow greenbaynet.com>
Subject: Re: [Re: Yet another reason I drive old vehicles...]
Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2000 13:06:39 -0600

I was mad because it wouldn't work. so I though you know maybe it needed a
nice throw.  But while i was up there i dropped my beer too :( so i dunno if
it was worth it.  Brakes work good though now.. even though i get a messed
up cab :(

-Don
----- Original Message -----
From: "Ryan Sturz" <68classic usa.net>
To: <61-79-list ford-trucks.com>
Sent: Wednesday, November 22, 2000 1:03 PM
Subject: [61-79-list] Re: [Re: Yet another reason I drive old vehicles...]


> Don,
>
> What were you doing with a brake caliper on your garage roof? :o)))
>
> Just curious...
>
> Ryan in CoCal
>
> > Ouch.  I think i paid that for my rotors pads and drums..
> > and even the bad caliper i dropped from my garage roof hehe
>
>
> ____________________________________________________________________
> Get free email and a permanent address at http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.amexmail.com/?A=1 ....


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