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61-79-list Digest Sat, 04 Nov 2000 Volume: 2000  Issue: 324

In This Issue:
Furnace line filter in a truck ?
Re: Help!  My truck won't run.....:-(
Re: Help!  My truck won't run.....:-(
steering column bushing for '65 F-100
Re: Colorado driving
Re: Help!  My truck won't run.....:-(
Lights
Re: Help!  My truck won't run.....:-(
Re: Help!  My truck won't run.....:-(
Re: Was move to Colorado, now winter driving.
Re: Was move to Colorado, now winter driving.
Re: Was move to Colorado, now winter driving.
SNOW PLOWING
Re: what cfm?
A sad day at the wrecking yard
Re: Move to Colorado (Ford Truck Recomendations)
Re: Was move to Colorado, now winter driving.
Re: Was move to Colorado, now winter driving.
Re: Move to Colorado (Ford Truck Recomendations)
Re: Move to Colorado (Ford Truck Recomendations)
Re: Winter Traction.... was Move to Colorado
Re: Move to Colorado
Re: Was move to Colorado, now winter driving.
Re: Was move to Colorado, now winter driving.
Re: A sad day at the wrecking yard

----------------------------------------------------------------------

From: "Serian" <serian mailandnews.com>
Subject: Furnace line filter in a truck ?
Date: Sat, 4 Nov 2000 14:37:21 -0500

> Say!.......I wonder if a fuel furnace tank filter would work.....???
> You know like an A-21?  One thing's for sure they sure keep the
> microns down but what about flow??

One of those fist-sized, can-style filters ?
I would guess that it is worth a try ...
Oil fired furnaces tend to run a higher viscosity fuel at relatively
low pressure, so I would guess that it should filter gasoline without
too much of a problem.  I'm not sure what kind of sucking power
a standard furnace has, but the pumps on them aren't all that big.
It would make a great water separator unit too ... if you try it,
share your results with the list !



------------------------------

From: "Gary" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: Help!  My truck won't run.....:-(
Date: Sat, 4 Nov 2000 14:58:53 -0800

Well........it pooped out again.......RATS ##$$%&^&^%$ .  I'm reasonably
sure it's fuel related but not absolutely at this point.  Tank could be so
dirty that the new filters are already plugging up.   Since they're cheap
I'll replace them first then go to an MSD-6 system so it will run even
without gas :-)

Happily Totally Retired,
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary :-)

some rocks out of my Motherinlaw's yard so that will be the test :-)


------------------------------

From: "Andersons" <robertan cfw.com>
Subject: Re: Help!  My truck won't run.....:-(
Date: Sat, 4 Nov 2000 15:37:52 -0500

My experience with frequent fuel filter plugging, on older vehicles, is that
you have to break down and remove the fuel tank, take it to a radiator shop
where they can hot-tank it and then coat the inside with the epoxy stuff.
Yes, real PITA, but costs <$100 and is the only way to really know you're
going to reach your destination.  Once the rust/crud layer on the bottom of
the tank starts breaking up, there's no other way to stop it.

----- Original Message -----
From: Gary <gpeters3 lni.net>
To: <61-79-list ford-trucks.com>
Sent: Saturday, November 04, 2000 5:58 PM
Subject: [61-79-list] Re: Help! My truck won't run.....:-(


> Well........it pooped out again.......RATS ##$$%&^&^%$ .  I'm reasonably
> sure it's fuel related but not absolutely at this point.  Tank could be so
> dirty that the new filters are already plugging up.   Since they're cheap
> I'll replace them first then go to an MSD-6 system so it will run even
> without gas :-)
>
> Happily Totally Retired,
> Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
> 78 Bronco Loving, Gary :-)
>
> some rocks out of my Motherinlaw's yard so that will be the test :-)
>
> =============================================================
> To  unsubscribe:   www.ford-trucks.com/mailinglist.html#item3
> Please remove this footer when replying.
>
>


------------------------------

From: Dlkiehl aol.com
Date: Sat, 4 Nov 2000 15:57:24 EST
Subject: steering column bushing for '65 F-100

My steering wheel shaft flops around side to side inside the steering column.
I'm guessing theres a bushing missing or worn out.  Can anyone tell me what
I need and where to get it?

Thanks,
Darryl Kiehl

------------------------------

From: canzus seanet.com
Date: Sat, 4 Nov 2000 13:27:18 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Colorado driving

At 07:27 AM 04:11:2000 -0800, Gary wrote:

>Do the police still stop traffic after storms in certain areas and require
>chains to continue?  I've run into this on a couple of occasions.

Up here in the Great Northwet, if you're going over Snoqualmie Pass
the SP will stop you *IF* the conditions require it,  They'll also require
high traction tires (studded snows) or chains...

Steve & the Rockette
68 F100, 390cid, FMX
63 F100, 292cid, 3speed
72 Capri 2000, hers
73 Capri 2600, terminal cancer...
73 MGB GT, Our Toy
94 SHO, SWMBO's
98 Contour SVT, Mine, Mine, All Mine....


------------------------------

From: canzus seanet.com
Date: Sat, 4 Nov 2000 13:27:19 -0800 (PST)
Subject: Re: Help!  My truck won't run.....:-(

At 07:39 AM 04:11:2000 -0800, Gary wrote:
>  Say!.......I wonder if a fuel furnace tank filter would work.....???
>You know like an A-21?  One thing's for sure they sure keep the
>microns down but what about flow??

I don't see why not, these are installed before the pump, and could
flow more GPM than the 460 could use, as most oil furnaces can have
up to 1 gpm nozzles installed in them....

The problem may lay in the "sock" in the tank however....

>Happily Totally Retired,

Rub it in a little more why doncha..... ;-)


Steve & the Rockette
68 F100, 390cid, FMX
63 F100, 292cid, 3speed
72 Capri 2000, hers
73 Capri 2600, terminal cancer...
73 MGB GT, Our Toy
94 SHO, SWMBO's
98 Contour SVT, Mine, Mine, All Mine....


------------------------------

From: "Jason and Kathy" <kendrick mddc.com>
Subject: Lights
Date: Sat, 4 Nov 2000 15:50:40 -0600

In my quest to get everything on this truck working properly, I found a
problem with the lights. The driver's side lights work properly, but the
passenger side headlight is dimmer, and the turnsignal operates much slower.
I wondered if it was a bad ground, but I can't seem to be able to figure out
where the front lights ground. I know the rear lights ground on the body
behind the light assemblys. Can anyone help? By the way, the truck is a 1978
F150 Ranger Lariat Supercab.

Jason Kendrick


------------------------------

From: "Gary" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: Help!  My truck won't run.....:-(
Date: Sat, 4 Nov 2000 19:36:10 -0800

No sock.....I don't like socks, they plug up :-)  Unfortunately they are not
replaceable, no one carries even a generic or one size fits all sock that
I've been able to find so you pull it off, replace the end of the pickup
with some brake line so you can get to the bottom of the tank then put a
really good filter in front of the pump.

Happily Totally Retired,
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary :-)

>  The problem may lay in the "sock" in the tank however....



------------------------------

From: "Gary" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: Help!  My truck won't run.....:-(
Date: Sat, 4 Nov 2000 19:44:32 -0800

This one came from a 75 van and now resides in my 78 pickup.  I think the
next step may be to replace it with a JCW Polly tank or metal one.  I
venture to guess that by the time you do all that you will be close to the
cost of a new tank and still will have one that is not reliable no matter
how much epxoy you throw at it.

Happily Totally Retired,
Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary :-)

> Yes, real PITA, but costs <$100 and is the only way to really know you're
> going to reach your destination.  Once the rust/crud layer on the bottom
of
> the tank starts breaking up, there's no other way to stop it.



------------------------------

From: "Ballinger" <ballingr sbmu.net>
Subject: Re: Was move to Colorado, now winter driving.
Date: Sat, 4 Nov 2000 19:38:44 -0600

>As to the invinsable 4x4 drivers, I have pulled enough so many of them
>out of the ditch in the winter.  A buddy of mine just bought a new >D&^%e
>and it was his 1st 4x4.  The first night in the snow, while in 4wd, spun
>it around and put in the ditch on the otherside of the road.  Well, the
>Ford (was running on 7 cyl., with more slop in the front slip yoke than
>I care to remember (dented the exhuast at 1 point)) pulled him out.  It
i>s still a standing joke that the 20 year old truck came to the rescue
>of a truck that had not even had its first payment paid:>)

>You should be fine driving a 2wd as long as good judgment, weight >and a
>little skill is used.

I'll never forget the time a friend of mine bought a new ('77) Ch*vy
Scottsdale 4X4 just in time for a 12 inch snow with a good wind that drifted
it up pretty good.  We were out playing around and you guessed it we got
high centered on a bank.

This little guy comes rolling up in a VW Beetle.  Tobaggan hat, little round
glasses, and a parka you couldn't even buy down here in the south.   He asks
in a Minnesota clip if we needed a pull.  We looked at him like he was nuts,
but said sure knock yourself out.  He pulls out this 4 inch wide rubber band
wiith hooks on it, and says to be ready to get on the brakes as soon as
we're free.   We get in and are laughing, yeah sure this will work.  I look
out the back window and he's gone a ways and  that band is now about an inch
wide, and "oh sh*t!" we like a shot, rocketed backwards, my  buddy is
standing on the brakes, and we barely stopped in time to keep from hitting
the Beetle.  The guy gets out grinnig from ear to ear and said he just loves
doing that.


------------------------------

Date: Sat, 04 Nov 2000 21:06:14 -0800
From: Greg <greg gregster.com>
Subject: Re: Was move to Colorado, now winter driving.




> This little guy comes rolling up in a VW Beetle.  Tobaggan hat, little round
> glasses, and a parka you couldn't even buy down here in the south.   He asks
> in a Minnesota clip if we needed a pull.  We looked at him like he was nuts,
> but said sure knock yourself out.  He pulls out this 4 inch wide rubber band
> wiith hooks on it, and says to be ready to get on the brakes as soon as
> we're free.   We get in and are laughing, yeah sure this will work.  I look
> out the back window and he's gone a ways and  that band is now about an inch
> wide, and "oh sh*t!" we like a shot, rocketed backwards, my  buddy is
> standing on the brakes, and we barely stopped in time to keep from hitting
> the Beetle.  The guy gets out grinnig from ear to ear and said he just loves
> doing that.

A tire between two chains will do the same as will some nylon ropes. Once I was
plowing snow off a small half acre pond for some skaters. When I got to the back
side where the bushes were, both front tires broke thru the ice. My dad came
over with a one inch nylon rope and "snapped" me back up on the ice with only
about five feet of slack in the rope. And his truck (a Ford of course) was on
the ice too.

>
> =============================================================
> To  unsubscribe:   www.ford-trucks.com/mailinglist.html#item3
> Please remove this footer when replying.


------------------------------

Date: Sat, 04 Nov 2000 19:27:07 -0700
From: Dave Oneal <dave davesmonsterpit.com>
Subject: Re: Was move to Colorado, now winter driving.

Keeper makes these, they call them stretch-n-snatch. they are very handy
and work good for pulling out stumps too. you can get them at jcwhitney,
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.jcwhitney.com/product.jhtml?CATID=5151.
At 09:06 PM 11/4/00 -0800, you wrote:



> > This little guy comes rolling up in a VW Beetle.  Tobaggan hat, little
> round
> > glasses, and a parka you couldn't even buy down here in the south.   He
> asks
> > in a Minnesota clip if we needed a pull.  We looked at him like he was
> nuts,
> > but said sure knock yourself out.  He pulls out this 4 inch wide rubber
> band
> > wiith hooks on it, and says to be ready to get on the brakes as soon as
> > we're free.   We get in and are laughing, yeah sure this will work.  I look
> > out the back window and he's gone a ways and  that band is now about an
> inch
> > wide, and "oh sh*t!" we like a shot, rocketed backwards, my  buddy is
> > standing on the brakes, and we barely stopped in time to keep from hitting
> > the Beetle.  The guy gets out grinnig from ear to ear and said he just
> loves
> > doing that.
>
>A tire between two chains will do the same as will some nylon ropes. Once
>I was
>plowing snow off a small half acre pond for some skaters. When I got to
>the back
>side where the bushes were, both front tires broke thru the ice. My dad came
>over with a one inch nylon rope and "snapped" me back up on the ice with only
>about five feet of slack in the rope. And his truck (a Ford of course) was on
>the ice too.
>

Dave
Davesmonsterpit
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.davesmonsterpit.com


------------------------------

From: "Jeffery Hansen" <billybobjoehansen hotmail.com>
Subject: SNOW PLOWING
Date: Sun, 05 Nov 2000 02:45:15 GMT

Wow, a story about the Muny Pit that doesn't envolve it broke down.  Well,
it was kinda, in process of being fixed.  I have 33's x 12.5 x 15 and
driving in the snow in North Chicago without 4WD as hairy and scarey.
Whenever the front tires hit just the slightest bit of snow, it was like
dropping anchor with the front end and the back would want to come around.
Had the front drive shaft taken out as this was just after the rear pumpkin
had exploded and I rebuilt the rear with 4:11's and a detroit locker, the
front still had the stock 3:7's.  Pulled into the parking lot at the clinic
one morning and stopped to back into my spot - Man I was there.  No going
forward, no going back.  About a foot of snow - both rear tires just sitting
there spinning, even with 400 lbs of sand in the back.  Talk about a big
laugh by all - monster truck stopped cold in it's tracks on flat level
ground by a little bit of snow.  Took six people pushing with me gasing it
to get it to move.  Dang BFGoodrich AT's ain't worth half what they cost
new.
The next winter - had to use 4WD twice - to get over the curb hump to pull
into the driveway.
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------------------------------

From: GMontgo930 aol.com
Date: Sat, 4 Nov 2000 22:15:36 EST
Subject: Re: what cfm?


Many moons ago, I had a '73 F100 with a 302. I built it with 10:1 pistons,
headers, Holley Street Dominator Intake manifold and a nice RV type camshaft.
It was toped with a Holley 600 w Vac Secondaries (4160 I believe). She ran
real nice though I don't know if I ever really used the whole 600 cfm or not.
From the data I've read in the past, a 500-600 cfm is about right on 302
depending upon what your doing. So for street use, I'd say a 500 is about
right. At least you'll have some decent throttle response out of it!

George M in Fl.

In a message dated 11/02/00 1:57:24 AM Eastern Standard Time, jpb222 psu.edu
writes:


>
> I have a 1976 f-100 with a stock 302 2V with dual exhaust and an
> automatic.  I bought a edelbrock performer 289 4V intake for cheap and
> would like to know what carb to get for it.  Would a 500 cfm 4V
> edelbrock be too big?
>
> thanks,
> John
>
>



George



------------------------------

From: "Jason Derra" <derrar internetcds.com>
Subject: A sad day at the wrecking yard
Date: Sat, 4 Nov 2000 19:32:41 -0800

I was at one of the local wrecking yard scrounging parts for some projects.
They were busy crushing old Chevy station wagons, Dodge Diplomats, and other
useless pieces of automotive treasure (or trash).  In the line of cars they
were picking from sat a '66 3/4 ton 2wd Ford.  It was really straight for
being in there.  It had all of the emblems and exterior trim pieces that
looked to be in good shape.   It had a chrome grille that was in excellent
shape and was not bent up.  The chrome was all in really good shape.
I couldn't watch as they fed it into the crusher.  When it came out of the
other end, they picked it up with a front end loader and set it on the pile
about 20 feet from where I was.  All I could think about as I watched was
how another piece of Ford truck history was being destroyed.  And how in 20
years, someone might be searching for an emblem, or that perfect chrome
grille, and not be able to find one.

Jason
'69 Bronco 5.0 HO EFI, NP435
'96 F250 Ext Cab 4WD Powerstroke
"As fast as necessary, as slow as possible"



------------------------------

From: GMontgo930 aol.com
Date: Sat, 4 Nov 2000 22:26:16 EST
Subject: Re: Move to Colorado (Ford Truck Recomendations)


Thie biggest thing I remember from driving in winter weather (mostly from my
youth) is pickups are light in the rear end. What most people did was to add
some weight. to improve the rear traction (2wd or 4wd). My dad would fill a
few old feed sacks with sand, the idea being if he got stuck, he'd have some
sand to help aid getting unstuck. Well, it worked well till they got wet and
froze to the tailgate! On the plus side, they didnt movee till spring!

My Grandfather was a bit more creative. He had a weight made from some old
railroad railing welded togather. He'd bolt this to the rear frame in place
of the spare. All total, it weight approx 350 lbs. He needed a floor jack to
get it in place.

These arnt the only idea's but are a few I've seen.

George M in Fl.

ps - that's why Im in Fl now - no snow ;-)!


In a message dated 11/02/00 8:25:27 AM Eastern Standard Time,
prozell yahoo.com writes:


> To the awesome Brain trust of the lists ;),
> A little background before the questions. I currently live in Oklahoma
> which is not known for Snow
> or other cold weather anomalies that much of the northern part of the
> country experiences, and now
> I am moving to Colorado for a new job. My question to the list is this, is
> a 4x4 truck a necessity
> in Colorado?!?!? Would a Dually handle the snow very well?? are there any
> other suggestions that
> anyone on the list could give to help me prepare for the transition between
> a very mild climate to
> one that tends to be a little colder?!?!?!
>
> Any tips and or help is highly appreciated.
>
> Sincerely,
> Paul
> 65 F100 460 C6
> 96 F150 5.0 (not 4 wheel, might sell)
>



George



------------------------------

From: daves8 juno.com
Date: Sat, 4 Nov 2000 21:35:37 -0700
Subject: Re: Was move to Colorado, now winter driving.

I damn near put a cottonwood tree through my back window with a nylon
rope "rubber band" a few years ago.  It hit the ground fifteen feet
behind the truck and dug a foot-deep hole ten feet long.

Be careful with anything you use to pull with.  The nylon straps with
loops on both ends (NOT hooks) work the best.  When the hooks break, they
come at you like a bullet.

Dave Schoenberg
Arvada, Colorado

On Sat, 04 Nov 2000 21:06:14 -0800 Greg <greg gregster.com> writes:
>
> A tire between two chains will do the same as will some nylon ropes.
Once I was
> plowing snow off a small half acre pond for some skaters. When I got to
the back
> side where the bushes were, both front tires broke thru the ice. My dad
came
> over with a one inch nylon rope and "snapped" me back up on the ice
with only
> about five feet of slack in the rope. And his truck (a Ford of course)
was on
> the ice too.

________________________________________________________________
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------------------------------

From: "Jason and Kathy" <kendrick mddc.com>
Subject: Re: Was move to Colorado, now winter driving.
Date: Sat, 4 Nov 2000 22:50:49 -0600

I have seen steel cables do the same thing. I was watching a guy pull
another truck with a 7/16" braided cable. When it snapped, it went through
the back window and shattered the windsheild of the truck pulling the other.
Jason

> Be careful with anything you use to pull with.  The nylon straps with
> loops on both ends (NOT hooks) work the best.  When the hooks break, they
> come at you like a bullet.



------------------------------

From: "Keith" <A2JKEITH GCI.NET>
Subject: Re: Move to Colorado (Ford Truck Recomendations)
Date: Sat, 4 Nov 2000 19:44:12 -0900

My first four trucks were the old Ford Courier/Mazda B2000 trucks, which are
two wheel drive granted they are alot lighter then the bigger Fords, but, a
few of the tricks I did were, #1 the first truck I found a stump that
weighed in at about 600 lbs, took me 2 hours of pushing and manuvering and
lifting to get it in the back of the truck (not an experience I would do
again I needed a few friends the next year). The last courier I had, that I
just sold a month ago when I got my REAL truck 71 F250 4x4 (paid a total of
$1600 for it, great condition) I used a rock that weighed about 400 lbs and
set it on an old tire with no rim so it wouldnt slide around. I had a friend
back in Oregon with a 72 F150 2wd (herman) that had a big piece of plate
steel that he cut with a torch to fit the exact size of his bed, and that
was his weight, it weighed about 500lbs and took 3 guys to put in, but, he
still had all of the space in the bed for hauling stuff so it was a great
idea I thought, the problem with this idea is to find a scrap piece or to
buy a piece this large, its definitly a good investment because it will
outlast the life of the truck easily all ya gotta do is hit it with a fresh
coat of paint every year, or do like he did and use the roll on bed liner
stuff on it, no rust, no worries, works great.
By the way, if anyone has any ideas on how to get the afore mentioned 4-500
lb rock into the back of my 71 (highboy, tail gate sits about 3 feet off the
ground) PLEASE LET ME KNOW! ! ! ! ! I havent had to use 4wd yet this year on
the ice and junk because my truck is really heavy and the studded 235 85 16
studded cooper mud terrains are doing well, but It would be nice to know my
old buddy is riding in the back again where he belongs :o) Thanks alot
Keith
Anch. Ak,
71 F250 4x4 ( #($&(*# Garrison and his power assist!!!!)
My dad would fill a
few old feed sacks with sand, the idea being if he got stuck, he'd have some
sand to help aid getting unstuck. >from some old
railroad railing welded togather. He'd bolt this to the rear frame in place
of the spare. All total, it weight approx 350 lbs.

I am moving to Colorado for a new job. My question to the list is this, is
a 4x4 truck a necessity in Colorado?!?!? Would a Dually handle the snow very
well?? are there any
other suggestions that
anyone on the list could give to help me prepare for the transition between
a very mild climate to
one that tends to be a little colder?!?!?!

Sincerely,
Paul
65 F100 460 C6
96 F150 5.0 (not 4 wheel, might sell)

>
>
>George
>
>
>=============================================================
>To  unsubscribe:   www.ford-trucks.com/mailinglist.html#item3
>Please remove this footer when replying.
>


------------------------------

From: "Jason and Kathy" <kendrick mddc.com>
Subject: Re: Move to Colorado (Ford Truck Recomendations)
Date: Sat, 4 Nov 2000 23:12:12 -0600

The only problem I have with ballast in the back of trucks in the winter is
this. If you're involved in an accident while you're moving and your ballast
is not secured, it will keep it moving in the same direction you were just
before your sudden stop. Ever wonder why so many old trucks have caved-in
box fronts? The best thing you can do would be to secure your ballast.
Jason Kendrick

> By the way, if anyone has any ideas on how to get the afore mentioned
4-500
> lb rock into the back of my 71 (highboy, tail gate sits about 3 feet off
the
> ground) PLEASE LET ME KNOW! ! ! ! ! I havent had to use 4wd yet this year
on
> the ice and junk because my truck is really heavy and the studded 235 85
16
> studded cooper mud terrains are doing well, but It would be nice to know
my
> old buddy is riding in the back again where he belongs :o) Thanks alot
> Keith


------------------------------

From: daves8 juno.com
Date: Sat, 4 Nov 2000 22:55:18 -0700
Subject: Re: Winter Traction.... was Move to Colorado

Christmas Eve of '82 we had a huge blizzard in Denver.  Christmas Day we
had about 3 or so feet of snow with 4 or 5 foot drifts in the roads in a
lot of places.  I had a little 2wd Toyota truck that was a year old and
the oem tires were bald.  I took the snowblower and put about 1000 pounds
of nice, wet snow in the box after a friend of mine laughed and said I'd
never go anywhere without getting stuck.

OK.. here's the Ford content........

I drove anywhere I wanted to the next few days..... passed all the stuck
American 4x4's (including Fords, sorry) right and left. (But I still wish
had my '69 HighBoy back again now.)

You should have seen the looks I got plowing through 4-foot drifts with
that truck...... 2-wheel-drive, bald tires, no chains......never missed a
beat!  :-)

Two weeks later, it took hot water and a fire axe to get that huge chunk
of ice out of the back of that little truck -- but it never shifted at
all while I had it in there, unlike most other kinds of ballast.

Just a testimonial for putting a little weight on the tires...

Dave Schoenberg
Arvada, Colorado



On Sat, 4 Nov 2000 23:12:12 -0600 "Jason and Kathy" <kendrick mddc.com>
writes:
> The only problem I have with ballast in the back of trucks in the
winter is
> this. If you're involved in an accident while you're moving and your
ballast
> is not secured, it will keep it moving in the same direction you were
just
> before your sudden stop. Ever wonder why so many old trucks have
caved-in
> box fronts? The best thing you can do would be to secure your ballast.
> Jason Kendrick

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------------------------------

From: "Dawn Chere" <dawnchere ados.com>
Subject: Re: Move to Colorado
Date: Sun, 5 Nov 2000 00:14:33 -0800

My 2 cents. (I'm starting on the bottom and working to the most recent so If
anyone else said this bear with me). I learned to drive in Colorado
admittedly on the western slope (Grand Junction)  But I agree with Tom.  I
couldn't afford a truck on my after school job so I had a gasp Vega but

I saw a lot of 4x4s in the ditches. . . they were so proud of them. . . they
could do anything. . . But stop on snow especially that Invisible Black Ice.

I remember riding with a friend cause her side step was "safer" as a truck
than my car and doing a 540 degree turn (360 and a half) on the highway when
we had to try to stop suddenly because some fool pulled out in front of us
and it was either hit the drunk or slow down fast. . .

***Make sure you have lots of room, you never know what those other
"drivers" will do, watch the side streets for those idiots, put some weight
over the back tires, and remember its four wheel drive not four wheel stop.

My little car was light but I never had chains are her and the only time I
got stuck was when I forgot to turn off the lights and ran down the
batteries or the one time I ran out of gas on my way to work.  <G>

Dawn Chere
St. Helens, OR Soon to be Colorado Springs, CO
78 Ford F250 XLT 460
78 Ford F100 Straight 6 ($500 OBO)
90 Plym Voyager SE V6 ($1000 OBO)
91 Dodge Shadow ES Convertible
86 Shelby Charger Turbo
79 Porsche 931
Reach me by ICQ.  My ICQ # is 36500512 or, send me E-mail Express directly
to my computer screen 36500512 pager.icq.com
-----Original Message-----
From: 61-79-list-bounce ford-trucks.com
[mailto:61-79-list-bounce ford-trucks.com]On Behalf Of Hogan, Tom
(Portland)
Sent: Thursday, November 02, 2000 9:05 AM
To: 61-79-list ford-trucks.com
Subject: [61-79-list] Re: Move to Colorado (Ford Truck Recomendations)

and now
> I am moving to Colorado for a new job. My question to the
>
> Any tips and or help is highly appreciated.
>
> Sincerely,
> Paul
>


[snip]

In my experience on the streets a 2wd with chains and sensible driving
habits can be more suitable on a snow covered road than a 4X4 and an
'invincible' driver.  Put a tube of sand in the bed and you have dual
advantages of extra weight over the wheels and a traction aid you can
scatter in front of the wheels to get you going.  Find a small snow shovel
to keep in the truck in case you get plowed into a parking place while at
work (don't ask).

On the street I wouldn't drive a 4X4 any different than a 2wd.  The 4x4 can
get you started a little easier sometimes but you still need to maintain
control and be able to stop.  Usually when I'm in a snow storm I don't go
much over 25 mph.  In most places after the first day the storm is over the
streets are clear anyway.

Tom H.
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------------------------------

Date: Sun, 05 Nov 2000 07:17:50 -0800
From: Greg <greg gregster.com>
Subject: Re: Was move to Colorado, now winter driving.



Jason and Kathy wrote:

> I have seen steel cables do the same thing. I was watching a guy pull
> another truck with a 7/16" braided cable. When it snapped, it went through
> the back window and shattered the windsheild of the truck pulling the other.
> Jason

Anyone worried about chains,cables or whatever breaking should invest in 3/8"
logging chains and hooks. They're heavier and more cumbersome but I guarantee
you won't break them by pulling vehicles out of snow, mud or whatever. (They're
great with the tire between two of them)  I've had these chains hooked to
hardwood trees that scored up over 1000 bd/ft of logs plus pulp ... about 10K
lbs. They cost about $4/foot and hooks are about $10 each. BTW ... I don't pull
these trees with my Fords! :-)

Greg
'77 F250 Explorer 4x4
'77 F100 Shortbox 4x4

>
>


------------------------------

From: "Jason and Kathy" <kendrick mddc.com>
Subject: Re: Was move to Colorado, now winter driving.
Date: Sun, 5 Nov 2000 09:24:41 -0600


Greg wrote;
> Anyone worried about chains,cables or whatever breaking should invest in
3/8"
> logging chains and hooks. They're heavier and more cumbersome but I
guarantee
> you won't break them by pulling vehicles out of snow, mud or whatever.

Greg, I agree completely! My chain is either 1/2" or 5/8" and is about 20'
long. It has a standard hook on one end that will fit the chain, and the
hook on the other end will grab anything 2" thick or less. Way overkill, but
nice to have when it's needed.
Jason


------------------------------

Date: Sun, 05 Nov 2000 12:22:19 -0500
From: Ted Wnorowski <theodore ford-trucks.com>
Subject: Re: A sad day at the wrecking yard

        This is when you get out the padlocks & chains and refuse to move
until they promise to save it !!!!!!!!!!!!!!! : )


At 07:32 PM 11/4/00 -0800, you wrote:

>I couldn't watch as they fed it into the crusher.  When it came out of the
>other end, they picked it up with a front end loader and set it on the pile
>about 20 feet from where I was.  All I could think about as I watched was
>how another piece of Ford truck history was being destroyed.  And how in 20
>years, someone might be searching for an emblem, or that perfect chrome
>grille, and not be able to find one. ....


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