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Date: Sat, 09 Sep 2000 18:35:47 -0400 (EDT)
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61-79-list Digest Fri, 08 Sep 2000 Volume: 2000  Issue: 233

In This Issue:
Re: Vacuum types, advances and fuel mixtures
Re: locked up engine????????????
Re: Vacuum types, advances and fuel mixtures
Re: locked up engine?
Pinging/knocking
Re: advance
Re: Well, I own it!
Re: Stuck motor
Re: locked up engine????????????
4 bbl spacer needed
HI PO PARTS
Re: locked up engine????????????
Re: I love (Durham, NC) junkyards.
Re: Vacuum types, advances and fuel mixtures
Bleeding brakes and CB's
Re: Ridges and Reamers
Re: Ridges and Reamers
Re: Bleeding brakes and CB's
Re: Bleeding brakes and CB's
Re: '78 bumper tabs
Junk Yards?????????
'67 Econoline Camper FS + Others Sacramento Area
Low mount swing out western mirror
intermittent wipers in a 66
Re: '78 bumper tabs

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Fri, 08 Sep 2000 14:31:03 -0500
Subject: Re: Advance
From: "John LaGrone" <jlagrone ford-trucks.com>

> It was a while ago but that is how it behaved.  With
> the vacuum hooked up the timing would be at 1 value.  Open the throttle and
> the timing would drop back a little until the engine speed and vacuum came
> up.

Maybe this is one reason the electronic distributors appeared. Does anyone
know if an engine equipped with one has this momentary lapse?

-- John
jlagrone ford-trucks.com     <]:-) <]:-)<]:-)<]:-)<]:-)<]:-)
1979 F150 Custom, Long Wide Bed, Regular Cab, 351M, C6 (Henry)
http://www.ford-trucks.com/jlagrone/henry.home.htm
Dearborn iron rules!!!!


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 08 Sep 2000 14:34:30 -0500
Subject: Re: locked up engine????????????
From: "John LaGrone" <jlagrone ford-trucks.com>

> I don't really understand why the ridge would be bigger on the bottom than on
> the top, but I agree if you've got a reamer and such that would be the way to
> do it.  Especially an old flat-head block, I don't suppose those are getting
> any easier to come by these days ...

The ridge is pretty much the same in diameter (same wear factor) but pistons
typically don't go as near the bottom of the cylinder bore as they do the
top, so the ridge would be longer measured top of cylinder to bottom of
cylinder on the crank end.

-- John
jlagrone ford-trucks.com     <]:-) <]:-)<]:-)<]:-)<]:-)<]:-)
1979 F150 Custom, Long Wide Bed, Regular Cab, 351M, C6 (Henry)
http://www.ford-trucks.com/jlagrone/henry.home.htm
Dearborn iron rules!!!!


------------------------------

From: "wish" <wish ford-trucks.net>
Date: Fri, 8 Sep 2000 18:39:54 GMT
Subject: Re: Vacuum types, advances and fuel mixtures

Gary et. al, here's some interesting things we've been ignoring in these discussions
...

a) when you step on the gas, the fuel mixture isn't instantaneously leaned out,
its actually richened because of the accelerator pump, part of its job is to
prevent the leaning.

b) we've been assuming that elec. ignition and points ignition are using the
same centrifugal advance and vaccuum advance, would be great if that were the
case, but with elec. ignition, even the early ones, sensing speed and deterimining
any additional advance would be no problem so the need for centrifical weights
would decrease, they may've still used them, but they may have changed the way
they were used too.

c) As for which vaccuum to use, I think there's more to be factored in that
"new vs. old" and "stock vs. modified (not in the M series sense :)"  Your ignition
may have quite a bit to do with that as well as the cam, the tuning of the carb,
all of that will eventually come into play ...

From the last post I've read it seems I should be able to lean my truck out
and switch it to ported to get some better mileage, but I have a hunch all that'll
do is create a huge bog off the line ...

Just my $.02
wish

96 Mustang GT 5spd 4.6L
73ish 1/2ton 4x4   6.4L
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.public.iastate.edu/~wish

Ford Truck Enthusiasts
http://www.ford-trucks.com

------------------------------

From: "Gary" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: locked up engine????????????
Date: Fri, 8 Sep 2000 16:11:57 -0700

I don't recall about other engines but on the 460 you couldn't get them out
the bottom without totally crushing them into little pieces due to the main
bearing bosses, they over lap the cylinders.  I suspect that most V-8's
would have this same problem?

I have never seen a block with a ridge at the bottom??  The ridge is caused
by a combination of hot gasses and lack of oil working on the area under the
top compression ring over time.  There is no chemical or physical activity
at the bottom to cause this kind of wear.  On a typical block you will find
the cylinders tapered due to this phenomenon and the bottom should be very
close to stock measurement even if the top has several thousandths worn out
of it.  One of the tests for a sound block is to measure the out of
roundness at the bottom of the cylinder where one would not expect any wear.
If it is found to be more than 0.004" out of round it is considered to be a
poor subject for a rebuild due to shifting of the iron in the block.

Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary :-)

hammer
> them out the bottom, you have to over come a larger ridge that you can't
get
> to to ream out.


------------------------------

From: "Gary" <gpeters3 lni.net>
Subject: Re: Vacuum types, advances and fuel mixtures
Date: Fri, 8 Sep 2000 16:22:27 -0700

As you say, there are more factors here than just mixture.  The cam plays an
important role in determining the exact cylinder pressure at a given rpm and
throttle setting.  It's not as simple as we sometimes try to make it in our
discussions.  Cylinder pressure affects the rate of burn as well as mixture
so......:-)

My answer to all of this is try both and use the one that works :-)

Michigan Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary :-)

> From the last post I've read it seems I should be able to lean my truck
out
> and switch it to ported to get some better mileage, but I have a hunch all
that'll
> do is create a huge bog off the line ...



------------------------------

From: "Bill Beyer" <bbeyer99 home.com>
Subject: Re: locked up engine?
Date: Fri, 8 Sep 2000 16:12:40 -0700

While in theory you might be correct, I've never seen a ridge at the bottom
of a cylinder. Remember that the forces exerted on the piston/rings are
tremendous at the top of the cylinder due to combustion. By the time the
ring/piston combo hits the bottom of the cylinder they have dissipated and
that's why you won't find any ridges down there.

"If you can't dazzle them with brilliance, riddle them with bullets"

----- Original Message -----
From: "John LaGrone" <jlagrone ford-trucks.com>
To: <61-79-list ford-trucks.com>
Sent: Friday, September 08, 2000 12:34 PM
Subject: [61-79-list] Re: locked up engine????????????


>
> The ridge is pretty much the same in diameter (same wear factor) but
pistons
> typically don't go as near the bottom of the cylinder bore as they do the
> top, so the ridge would be longer measured top of cylinder to bottom of
> cylinder on the crank end.




------------------------------

From: "Jeffery Hansen" <billybobjoehansen hotmail.com>
Subject: Pinging/knocking
Date: Sat, 09 Sep 2000 00:09:05 GMT

   WHILE we're all reading and/or discussing issues related to retarding
timing, advancing timing, etc., let me pose this quandry.  It's on The Muny
Pit.  My 79 F-150 4WD with the fresh 429 (about 6000 miles).  After the
breakdown on the interstate (I know - which one) back in Arpil I trashed the
Mallory Unlite (mechicanical advance). Mechanic I had taken it too just the
week before had suggested it then. (First and Only mechanic I have ever
taken anything to - haven just put the new Edelbrock carb (650/electric
choke) on - wanted to get everything set right)  He told me that the 69 429
liked a base of around 6-8 degrees BTDC, and a total of 45 degrees advance.
With the Mechanical advance - I had it set at 6 at idel - but after that it
had 25 - period - no matter accelerating, decelerating, etc.  BUT - I never
had a spark knock under normal driving conditions.  By that I mean, sure, if
I burried the pedal at 30 mph in 4th I'd get a knock - but I just didn't do
that.  Mech said put the vacume advance on and I'd have tons more highway
power - that the mech. advance was for a radical race engine with radical
cam for wide open running.  Kinda thought this all along myself (mallory was
in it when I bought it)
   After the Mallory froze up on me the third time and made it's way into
the circular file - I replaced the distributor with the stock FOMOCO rebuilt
points type from the local Advance Auto.  Never have had the funds to take
it in to get everything "set" as I did before (It's constantly sucking my
wallet dry).  The edelbrock has two ports.  One constant - one ported. I
tried the constant first - engine couldn't be made to idle under 1500, died
with the slightest load letting off the clutch.  Plugged it to the ported.
Runs fine, great even - except for even the slightest load.  Why head up a
moderate hill at 55 to 60 and the engine knocks and pings so loud - I have
to gradually let of the gas until I'm puttering and downshifting to get up
the hill.
  When I rebuilt it, I stepped down to 9:1 verse the stock 11:1.  Got 4:11
gears for the 33"ers.  Use only the most expensive gas I can find (LOL),
i.e. the highest octane stuff.
  I loved the Mallory for one reason - got 15 mpg on the open road.
Haven't checked since changing the distrib - but takes me about a quarter
tank (39 gal tank) to drive to Rich's - probably 15 miles, mostly interstate
until the last mile.  Any suggestions?  Thoughts?
_________________________________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.hotmail.com.

Share information about yourself, create your own public profile at
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://profiles.msn.com.


------------------------------

From: DWeaver232 aol.com
Date: Fri, 8 Sep 2000 20:29:05 EDT
Subject: Re: advance

One thing that has not been brought up is that when you open the throttle at
low rpms and at heavy loads  a carbed car will lean out. You want the advance
to retard (less vacuam advance) to prevent severe knocking.  You also can run
extreme advance under decelleration to completly burn the very lean mixture
present. Now as for dual diaphram distributors, these are all for emissions.
You want to retard the advance at low speeds/part throttle to make the engine
run hotter and burn more efficently. Many cars have sensors/switches that
will not allow the vacuam advance to work below certain speeds/throttle
position or temperature.

Terry Weaver
78 F350 SC srw

------------------------------

From: JUMPINFORD aol.com
Date: Fri, 8 Sep 2000 20:48:06 EDT
Subject: Re: Well, I own it!

In a message dated 9/8/00 6:38:15 AM Pacific Daylight Time,
wish ford-trucks.net writes:

<< >Transmission: The only information provided is Automatic. My guess is C6
>Front Axle: No code selected
>Rear Axle: 2.75 3750lb Ford
>


C6 would probably be a good guess for a 460 power plant ... did they ever put
any other auto (other than the E4OD) behind the 460 ?   >>

Nope, just C-6.  I think the reason its G versus any other C-6 code, is the
460 C-6 I had has external reinforcing ribs on it.  The ones behind 351m/400
dont.  I have no idea whether a 429 C6 had the ribs or not.

Darrell & Tweety

------------------------------

From: DWeaver232 aol.com
Date: Fri, 8 Sep 2000 20:50:37 EDT
Subject: Re: Stuck motor

One place for good info on stuck motors would be a site that deals with old
tractors.
They tend to deal with really old seized stuff. ytmag.com is one site. Kroil
penetrant seems to be the best recommended one,followed by PBlaster. Homemade
tends toward 15% Marvel 15% ATF the rest kerosene. Although on mine I might
get around to using straight Alcohol since it does such a good job of
removing rust from gas tanks and plugging up fuel filters. One idea if you
have the time and it is a manual is too jack up one wheel after appling
penetrant and to give the wheel a good kick every time you go by, may take a
few months but farmers usually have plently of stuff to fix before they get
around to that last tractor they found that's been outside under a tree since
1949. Breaker bars on front crank nut will also work. Beer in one hand
up/down on the bar with the other. If you are in a hurry (shouldn't be, leave
penetrant in at least a week) is to remove valve cover and find a cylinder
with the valves closed. Take a sparkplug hollow it out and attach a grease
fitting to it. Then try pumping that cylinder full of grease with a grease
gun. One more idea is to stuff as much rope soaked in penetrant of choice
into the cylinder then fill with grease. This will help seal the valves if
they are slightly open.

Terry Weaver
78 F350 SC srw
37 AC B

------------------------------

From: SHill48337 aol.com
Date: Fri, 8 Sep 2000 21:29:36 EDT
Subject: Re: locked up engine????????????

In a message dated 9/8/00 1:15:23 PM Pacific Daylight Time, gpeters3 lni.net
writes:

<<  have never seen a block with a ridge at the bottom??  The ridge is caused
by a combination of hot gasses and lack of oil working on the area under the
top compression ring over time.  There is no chemical or physical activity
at the bottom to cause this kind of wear.  On a typical block you will find
the cylinders tapered due to this phenomenon and the bottom should be very
close to stock measurement even if the top has several thousandths worn out
of it.  >>

Exactly, not to mention there is pressure at the top of the compression
stroke which forces the rings outward and essentially no pressure at the
bottom of the power stroke because the exhaust valve opens before the piston
gets to the bottom.  This combined with the things Gary mentioned make the
ridge form on the top and not on the bottom.  Of course in some cases of
extreme cylinder wear you may notice a small ridge at the bottom.
Burt Hill Kennewick WA 1972 F-250 4x4 460

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 08 Sep 2000 21:57:44 -0400
From: Joe <shoman p3.net>
Subject: 4 bbl spacer needed

Anybody
have a  4 bbl spacer with an pcv port in the back for my 390???Holley
carb..
Joe


------------------------------

From: "G & J Boling" <flash1 alltel.net>
Subject: HI PO PARTS
Date: Fri, 8 Sep 2000 21:49:32 -0400

Heres a link to a bunch of places that sell HI PO Parts i just found if
anyone is interested
gordon

http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://hpautoproducts.com/Warehouses.html


------------------------------

From: GMontgo930 aol.com
Date: Fri, 8 Sep 2000 23:09:50 EDT
Subject: Re: locked up engine????????????

In a message dated 9/8/2000 3:37:34 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
jlagrone ford-trucks.com writes:

<< > I don't really understand why the ridge would be bigger on the bottom
than on
> the top, but I agree if you've got a reamer and such that would be the way
to
> do it.  Especially an old flat-head block, I don't suppose those are
getting
> any easier to come by these days ...

The ridge is pretty much the same in diameter (same wear factor) but pistons
typically don't go as near the bottom of the cylinder bore as they do the
top, so the ridge would be longer measured top of cylinder to bottom of
cylinder on the crank end.
 >>

Also, there's not near the side loading effect on the walls from the mixture
burning. From everything ive read, this occurs at or near the top of the
stroke due to the combustion pressure and the angle of the rod to the
centerline of the cylinder.

George M in Fl.

------------------------------

From: Seventy4SCab aol.com
Date: Fri, 8 Sep 2000 23:12:33 EDT
Subject: Re: I love (Durham, NC) junkyards.

FTEers,

I have seen a webpage showing a junkyard in the Durham, NC area. The website
is www.oftc.com then a click to their virtual junkyard. I have seen a pic of
a 57 F100 in this yard with a chrome grill that I would greatly desire to
have.

Are there any list members here from this area?

Glenn in TN

------------------------------

From: GMontgo930 aol.com
Date: Fri, 8 Sep 2000 23:22:57 EDT
Subject: Re: Vacuum types, advances and fuel mixtures

In a message dated 9/8/2000 3:38:55 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
wish ford-trucks.net writes:

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
Gary et. al, here's some interesting things we've been ignoring in these
discussions
...

a) when you step on the gas, the fuel mixture isn't instantaneously leaned
out,
its actually richened because of the accelerator pump, part of its job is to
prevent the leaning.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

Partly true from my understanding. However, air travel faster than fuel in
the manifolds. When the throttle is stabed open, the air which has less mass
and weight will change velosity quicker than the fuel, leaving some fuel
behind. Thus the leaning effect untill the fuel catches up. Even with an
accelerator pump. In practical use, the leaning probibly has negligable
effects on the performance since the extra fuel is dumped in at the same time
as the throttles are opened (effectivle shortening, but not eliminating the
delay)

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
b) we've been assuming that elec. ignition and points ignition are using the
same centrifugal advance and vaccuum advance, would be great if that were the
case, but with elec. ignition, even the early ones, sensing speed and
deterimining
any additional advance would be no problem so the need for centrifical
weights
would decrease, they may've still used them, but they may have changed the
way
they were used too.

c) As for which vaccuum to use, I think there's more to be factored in that
"new vs. old" and "stock vs. modified (not in the M series sense :)"  Your
ignition
may have quite a bit to do with that as well as the cam, the tuning of the
carb,
all of that will eventually come into play ...

From the last post I've read it seems I should be able to lean my truck out
and switch it to ported to get some better mileage, but I have a hunch all
that'll
do is create a huge bog off the line ...

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

Not to be sarcastic, but are you sure the accelerator pump and mixtures are
reset right for the new vacume source. Everything Ive seen and read says if
you have a bog off the line, your going lean and need more enrichment. It
could be the manifold vac setup is just covering up the bog by not responding
with the "same timing curve".

My thoughts - right or wrong.

George M in Fl.



------------------------------

From: "Jason and Kathy" <kendrick mddc.com>
Subject: Bleeding brakes and CB's
Date: Fri, 8 Sep 2000 22:54:32 -0500


I'm bleeding the brakes on my newly acquired '78 F150 Ranger Lariat, and it's got an electric brake controller mounted under the dash. It's actuated by brake fluid pressure via a brake line that is T'd off the front brake port on the master cylinder. Anyone have any ideas on how to bleed this?
Also, further investigation has revealed that this truck has a CB mounted on the left (drivers) side of the rear seat(supercab). It's mounted immediately to the left of the seat. It has a Ford logo stamped into the outer cover.  On top of the unit is a Ford part number. D8LF-19A195-5FD880 6. The wiring is run under the carpeting, and comes to an end at a plug mounted under the ashtray. The plug has 23 pins. Does anyone know where I might find a replacement controller/microphone for this CB?
 Thanks-more questions later,
Jason


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 08 Sep 2000 21:22:48 -0700
From: Marv & Marge <ae722 lafn.org>
Subject: Re: Ridges and Reamers

John LaGrone <jlagrone ford-trucks.com> wrote, in part:
> If you hammer them out the bottom, you have to over come a larger ridge
> that you can't get to to ream out. You also risk breaking a ring and severely
> scratching the bore by hammering out through the bottom.

I dunno', John.  I suppose there SHOULD be a ridge at the bottom of the bore for
the same reasons there is one at the top (except that's not where the maximum
cylinder pressures occur), but after being into dozens of engines over the last
thirty-five or so years, I've never seen a ridge at the bottom of a cylinder.
As a matter of fact, that's where I've found the best place to "mike" them, as
that's where they are the least worn.

The reason I don't take them out the bottom is that usually there is something
small and insignificant like a main webbing in the way.  Once in a while you run
across a design that might allow bottom removal, but I can't think of any at the
moment.  Just the same, I wouldn't think to do it that way.

ANYBODY that's going to consider going through a motor should get (at least rent)
a ridge reamer and learn how to use it properly.  You can dork up a perfectly
bore-able block with one of these if you're not careful.

-M-

Marv Miller  mailto:ae722 lafn.org
"Striving to be the person
that my dog thinks I am".

------------------------------

From: "rich" <richth exis.net>
Subject: Re: Ridges and Reamers
Date: Sat, 9 Sep 2000 01:19:40 -0400


> ANYBODY that's going to consider going through a motor should get (at
least rent)
> a ridge reamer and learn how to use it properly.  You can dork up a
perfectly
> bore-able block with one of these if you're not careful.

AMEN... Marve.  (dont ask)  FWIW, I have a good one now! :)

Rich


------------------------------

From: "G & J Boling" <flash1 alltel.net>
Subject: Re: Bleeding brakes and CB's
Date: Sat, 9 Sep 2000 01:28:30 -0400

Does anyone know where I might find a replacement controller/microphone for
this CB?
>   Thanks-more questions later,
> Jason
>
> =============================================================
best bet is to go to radio shack buy one of their noise cancelling mikes
they have they are one of the best made besides ASATIC find a C/B shop and
have the old connection pin installed to the new mike then usually runs
about 10.00 bucks or so
gordon


------------------------------

From: "Garrett Nelson" <garrettnelson writeme.com>
Subject: Re: Bleeding brakes and CB's
Date: Sat, 9 Sep 2000 00:30:24 -0500


That would work if all you needed was the mic. I think with that type of setup there are electronics such as the channel switch also located in the microphone. Sorry, I don't know where to find one. You might want to try contacting a Ford dealer.

---Garrett www.1966ford.com


 ----- Original Message -----
 From: G & J Boling
 To: 61-79-list ford-trucks.com
 Sent: Saturday, September 09, 2000 12:28 AM
 Subject: [61-79-list] Re: Bleeding brakes and CB's


 Does anyone know where I might find a replacement controller/microphone for
 this CB?
 >   Thanks-more questions later,
 > Jason
 >
 > =============================================================
 best bet is to go to radio shack buy one of their noise cancelling mikes
 they have they are one of the best made besides ASATIC find a C/B shop and
 have the old connection pin installed to the new mike then usually runs
 about 10.00 bucks or so
 gordon




------------------------------

Date: Fri, 8 Sep 2000 19:58:26 -0400
From: David Wadson <wadsond air.on.ca>
Subject: Re: '78 bumper tabs

>>  Hey Thom, aren't those for the bumper jack ??
>
>Pickups shouldn't have bumper jacks. My 79 has a screw jack that sits under
>the I Beam or the axle housing. Bumper jacks should be thrown as far as you
>can as quickly as you can. Replace it with a good set of tires, a nice
>hydraulic bottle jack, and a four way lug wrench. Any thing less with a
>truck is risky at best.

Well I agree that the bumper jacks can be quite dangerous (though very
handy in some instances) a bottle jack is not always the best. I found out
in the middle of a cold winter, that you can't get a bottle jack under an
i-beam when you have a seriously flat tire. I had to use the scissor jack
out of my mother's H*nda to jack up my truck. Bottle jacks are very hand
but you definitely need to have a rolling floor jack as well!


David Wadson - wadsond air.on.ca
"PS1" - 79 F100 ...ground into a million pieces.
"PS2" - 78 F100 ...currently alive and kicking.
"PS3" - 79 F150 4x4 ...now what have I gotten myself into...
Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada



------------------------------

From: "Jeffery Hansen" <billybobjoehansen hotmail.com>
Subject: Junk Yards?????????
Date: Sat, 09 Sep 2000 16:22:42 GMT

Junk Yards?????  One mans junk is another mans treasure.  I prefer to think
of them as "treasure yards".  When I bought my 3rd 86 Turbo T-bird, she was
one Plane Jane of a beauty.  After a year of visiting beloved Treasure Yards
- she had every single option offered that year - minus the sunroof.
Smartest thing our Father Henry ever came up with - one single wiring
harness for each model - that the options just plugged into.  Unlike GM.
Traded my 2nd T-bird (after having the trunk caved in by a semi, passenger
side whell base shortened 4 inchs, to a buddy who owns a body shop and
wanted the "perfect car" for his 16 year old to learn to drive) for a
freshly painted 84 Camero.  Kept that car a whole 200 miles - just the
distance from Jacksonville, NC to Norfolk, VA.  (I really bleed blue) Before
I sold it - I wanted to fix the melted radio wiring harness. Went to a GM
only junk yard in Suffolk, VA - looked in maybe 30 Camero's from around 80
through whatever - every single one had different underdash wiring
harnesses.
 Side note:  The Muny Pit didn't break down this week!  Course - haven't
driven it since coming back from Rich's and putting the booster on - been
out playing in the big pond this week.

Jeffery A. Hansen, HMC(SW/AW/FMF)
Independent Duty Hospital Corpsman
USS ARLEIGH BURKE(DDG-51)
Embody COURAGE to Honor
your COMMITMENTS

_________________________________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.hotmail.com.

Share information about yourself, create your own public profile at
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------------------------------

From: "Carver" <carver ncwebsurfer.com>
Subject: '67 Econoline Camper FS + Others Sacramento Area
Date: Sat, 9 Sep 2000 09:27:41 -0700

Found in the Grass Valley paper (30 miles East of Sacramento)

'67 Econoline Pop Up Camper Van $1200 obo 530-265-2944

'75 3/4 ton 460 eng, PS, PB, AT, good cond $2500 obo 530-268-1372

'76 F250 Ranger 460 eng, PS, PT, AC, dual fuel tanks,
looks and runs great, $2500 530-265-5466

'78 F250 HD Pickup AC, Custom wheels/tires, Bed liner, great truck
$2850 obo  530-477-5237

and to haul one of them (or your clunker with one of the above)

HD Car trailer, tandem axle, Needs little work,  $1050  530-272-1690

Looks like 460's are popular up here!

Jeff  '64 F100 CrewCab

------------------------------

From: "MARTY COLMAN" <colman76 hotmail.com>
Subject: Low mount swing out western mirror
Date: Sat, 09 Sep 2000 17:32:32 GMT

John wrote:

>BTW, the outside door mirrors we were discussing a couple of
>weeks back are
>referred to as "LO-MOUNT SWING OUT WESTERN MIRROR" on page 43.


Thanks John, I've been wondering what Ford called them.  It's hard to
describe a peticular mirror without a name or picture.

Still can't find a good set of factory ones.  I've scoured the local yards
with no luck, but I haven't given up yet.  I suppose one of these days I'll
stumble across a set when I least expect it.

Appreciate it.

Marty
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------------------------------

From: "Garrett Nelson" <garrettnelson writeme.com>
Subject: intermittent wipers in a 66
Date: Sat, 9 Sep 2000 14:14:43 -0500


What do I need to do to get intermittent wipers in my 66 F100? Right now the wipers don't work very good... lots of slop in the mechanism and the wipers don't stop at the bottom when you turn off the switch... they also come down too far and slap into the window seal with an annoying noise.

I thought since they need work anyways I might as well modernize them... What is involved in converting to delay style wipers? New switch? New motor?



---Garrett www.1966ford.com



------------------------------

Date: Sat, 09 Sep 2000 19:21:02 -0700
From: Greg <greg gregster.com>
Subject: Re: '78 bumper tabs




>
>
> Well I agree that the bumper jacks can be quite dangerous (though very
> handy in some instances) a bottle jack is not always the best. I found out
> in the middle of a cold winter, that you can't get a bottle jack under an
> i-beam when you have a seriously flat tire. I had to use the scissor jack
> out of my mother's H*nda to jack up my truck. Bottle jacks are very hand
> but you definitely need to have a rolling floor jack as well!
>
> David Wadson - wadsond air.on.ca
> "PS1" - 79 F100 ...ground into a million pieces.
> "PS2" - 78 F100 ...currently alive and kicking.
> "PS3" - 79 F150 4x4 ...now what have I gotten myself into...
> Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada

NAPA has a 12 ton shorty bottle jack about 7-8" tall. Works for me.
....


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