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Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 20:39:23 -0700 (MST)
From: owner-fordtrucks61-79-digest ListService.net (fordtrucks61-79-digest)
To: fordtrucks61-79-digest ListService.net
Subject: fordtrucks61-79-digest V1 #325
Reply-To: fordtrucks61-79 ListService.net
Sender: owner-fordtrucks61-79-digest ListService.net


fordtrucks61-79-digest Friday, October 31 1997 Volume 01 : Number 325



=======================================================================
Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1961-1979 Trucks Digest
Visit our web site: http://www.ford-trucks.com/
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To unsubscribe, send email to:
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with the word "unsubscribe" in the body of the message. For help, send
email to the same address with the word "help" in the body of the
message.
=======================================================================
In this issue:

Ford 460 Oiling problem [jlringard mysurf.com (Mysurf_Lynn Ringard)]
Is everybody tired of the V8 firing order? ["Daniel H. Jenkins"
Re: changing fluid in 4spd/tcase [sdelanty sonic.net]
[none] [sdelanty sonic.net]
Re: Flywheel Teeth [sdelanty sonic.net]
Re: Header selection for FE... [sdelanty sonic.net]
Re: Payloads [sdelanty sonic.net]
Torque specifications Q. #324 [Alan Mittelstaedt ]
RE: Torque Specifications Question [Sleddog ]
RE: Torque Specifications Question [Sleddog ]
RE: Torque Specifications Question [Sleddog ]
ADMIN: List of people who got stickers [Ken Payne ]
Re: Torque Specifications Question [sdelanty sonic.net]
I'm back and smiling like a fool! ["deconblu" ]
Torque Specs [Bill03bt aol.com]
Re: Torque Specifications Question ["deconblu" ]
66 f100 dash [A66f100 ]
Oxygen Sensor/Meter ["Dale and Donna Carmine" ]
Re: Torque Specs ["deconblu" ]

=======================================================================

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 15:10:16 -0800
From: jlringard mysurf.com (Mysurf_Lynn Ringard)
Subject: Ford 460 Oiling problem

>Date: Wed, 29 Oct 1997 08:46:39 -0800
>To: fordtrucks61-70-request listservice.net
>From: Lynn Ringard
>Subject: Ford 460 Oiling problem
>Cc: help
>Bcc: help
>
>Help!
>
> I have a rebuilt 460 motor in a 78 F250 4X4. When it warms up the
oil pressure drops to 40 psi and will go lower when you put a load on the
motor, ie going up a hill. All rod, main bearing clearances are with in spec
on clearance.(.0015 rod, .002, .003 main) I just changed from crane variable
duration lifters and got a small improvement in pressure. I also put on a
new high volume oil pump along with a new ford pickup . The oil pan is from
a 87 truck as is the pump and pickup( rear sump). This is my second motor in
2 weeks and has the same problem as the first. I swapped over the cam,
lifters, rollor rockers, oil pump and pickup to the new short block. It has
80 psi on start up, then goes to about 60 psi in about 10 minutes. Then when
I get on the road for about 15 to 20 minutes it drops to 40 psi. If I hook
up my trailer it will go as low as 25 psi and I'm afraid the motor won't
last to long. The oil pressure guage is an auto guage 0 to 100psi and has
been calibrated to insure that's not the problem. Oh yea, all the while it
runs great and has good power.
>
>Please help with this problem if you can it's driving me crazy. Thanks Jon
Ringard
>
K
R

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 15:32:34 -0800 (PST)
From: "Daniel H. Jenkins"
Subject: Is everybody tired of the V8 firing order?

Well, I tried Deacon Blue's way of finding where the rotor belongs
for the number one cylinder, and it si right where it is marked on the
cap. Ugh! I've tried everything! I'm going to go check the timing, but
I don't see how it could be off... I didn't move the distributor. All I
know is it's starting to get dark, and I DON'T fancy moving my truck via
people power!! ;) THanks for the help.

- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Daniel H. Jenkins Food for thought: John Milton
djenkins honors.unr.edu wrote _Paradise_Lost_; When his
Honors Program wife died he wrote _Paradise_
University of Nevada, Reno _Regained_...

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 15:38:58 -0800
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: Re: changing fluid in 4spd/tcase

>I'm getting ready to do the coil front suspension thing anybody have any
>tips for me?
>- --
>Don Grossman
>duckdon pacific.net

Yeah Don, have lots of beer on hand and don't forget that pick'n'pull
is having a 1/2 price sale this weekend!

Happy motoring,

Steve Delanty

Measure it with a micrometer,
mark it with chalk,
cut it with an axe...

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 15:39:01 -0800
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: [none]

>
>OK, here is where I get lost. Lets take an F-250 3/4 ton with a payload of
>1500 lb.. Say you have two real men in the cab that weight 200 lb. each. How
>much does a full camper weight? Add camping eq. and Beer, a full water tank,
>clothes, toiletries and Beer.

Forces one to make some decisions don't it?
If the 2 of You weigh 400lbs, that leaves 1100. Hmmm... If You drink
good beer from long neck bottles (1.352lbs ea) You can only carry
813.6 beers. If You drink cheap beer from Aluminum cans (.841 lbs ea),
You can stock a payload of 1308 beers...
Ooohh, what to do... what to do? (-:

> It just seems to me that 1500 lb. isn't very much. When they say carry
>safely is it just a relative term meaning little as far as max. payload? I'm
>trying to figure out how much I can carry in the F372.

I've had over 1200 lbs in my F100 with the old beat down 4+1 leaf spring
pack. It sat very low (and crooked), but wasn't *that* awful. (wasn't fully
down on the overloads)
Since I put the good 6+1 spring pack in, I've had what I'm sure was more
than 1200lbs in it, and it was fine.
I think these things are pretty conservatively rated. They ain't like
some crummy isuzu 1/2 ton truck, where if You put 1002 lbs in it it'll
squat down on the stops and maybe not come all the way back up again
when the load is removed...
Some of the limiting factor may be stopping distance (can Your brakes
stop an extra ton?) as much as suspension rating... I dunno.

> I keep saying deliveries like it's a secret what it is. I'm carrying...
>no better not tell! Kidding! Their plastic zip loc bags. A 48"X48" pallet 4'
>high can weight 2000 lb..

Seriously? I thought You were joking when I asked last week what You
were hauling and You said "empty ziplock bags"!!

Hope You enjoy Your new toy!

Happy halloween!

Steve Delanty

Measure it with a micrometer,
mark it with chalk,
cut it with an axe...

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 15:39:06 -0800
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: Re: Flywheel Teeth

anyway I went and picked up the used flywheel from the
>yard the other day and got home and started to count the teeth and found
>that there are some that are chipped I looked in some of my catalogs and
>found that new teeth are inexpensive but how do you put them on? I don't
>see any welds is it pressed on? Can I do this job myself or do I need to
>take it somewhere to have it done? Who does this sort of repair? Thanks
>for the help.

I changed the ring gear on my FE390 flywheel. I cut the old one off
the flywheel by cutting through it in one place with the die grinder.
(hacksaw would work) Someone gave me a flywheel with a roasted clutch
surface but good ring gear. I heated up the ring gear with the torch
and knocked it off with a brass hammer. You want to heat the gear fairly
quickly so the flywheel doesn't get too hot or else the flywheel will
expand with the gear and it wont come off. You want only the gear to
expand when heated, NOT the flywheel.
I laid the good flywheel face down on a flat surface, heated the gear to
about 350F, picked it up with my gloves on and dropped it onto the
flywheel. No pressing needed here. It just falls all the way on.
Once everything has cooled (or the ring gear and flywheel are at the
same temp) it's on for good...

Happy Halloween,

Steve Delanty

Measure it with a micrometer,
mark it with chalk,
cut it with an axe...

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 15:39:09 -0800
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: Re: Header selection for FE...

>Hi all,
> I have begun to put on a new exhaust system on my FE 390 and have
>started to look for headers. I'm not looking to break any quarter mile
>records or anything, and durabilty is an issue as well as price and fit.
>Anyone had good results with a certain brand of header for an FE engine?
>I've priced Hooker's super competition at 250.00 bucks(kinda pricey but that
>was the only one offered for the FE) and Hedman's at 116.00 bucks(I wonder
>if I'll have to carve out my truck to get 'em to fit!). Those are the only
>two that would fit my truck that I've been able to locate with a quick
>search so far. One brand of header, I can't remember which, wouldn't fit
>because of a front sway bar. What gives? How could the front sway bar
>influence the header? The collecter is at the rear..right? ;~) The
>chasis is a 2 wheel drive 75 F250 crew cab, p/s, p/b, manual on the floor
>and no a/c. Thanks in advance...Paul

I put a set of hookers on my 2wd '71F100 w/FE390 almost 2 years ago.
They were very tight on the drivers side between the collector flange
and the bell housing flange (T-18) they didn't *quite* touch, but rattled
together when cold, and I had to clearence the bell housing flange just a
smidge with the die grinder. There isn't much clearence between the
headers and starter, but enough. I had to make a longer starter cable
so I could route it away from the header.
I like them fine, haven't had any probs with them yet.
I'm pretty sure I only paid about $180 for them tho...

Happy halloween,

Steve Delanty

Measure it with a micrometer,
mark it with chalk,
cut it with an axe...

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 15:39:12 -0800
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: Re: Payloads

>Allright, I'll fess up. In addition to the '64 F-100 CrewCab, I own
>Volkswagen busses and am on a VW bus email group.
>
>There was a discussion early this year on payloads.
>All you truck types might be surprised to know that VW busses are
>rated as a ONE ton payload vehicle, always have been.
>Puny vehicle for such a payload, it appears.

Yes, the torsion bar suspension on those things was great.
I had *over* 1000lbs in my 67 bus a couple times, and it was fine.
Getting it stopped from speed was loads of laffs tho...

Sure do prefer the F100 when it comes to hauling fat loads. (-:

Happy halloween,

Steve Delanty

Measure it with a micrometer,
mark it with chalk,
cut it with an axe...

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 06:08:35 -0800
From: Alan Mittelstaedt
Subject: Torque specifications Q. #324

> Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 15:55:56 +0000
> From: "Gary, 78 BBB"
> Subject: Re: Torque Specifications Question
>
> > Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 12:36:40 -0700
> > From: Keith Srb
> > Subject: Re: Torque Specifications Question
>
> > >you don't and RTV for head bolts. If anything, dry threads will be
> > >the most likely to give you an inaccurate torque.


Don't you also imply inconsistent? Perfectly clean threads can be
accurate, but most threads are not perfectly clean (read: light
corrosion, or dirty). Consistent torque readings are particularly
important on heads/manifolds and aluminum pieces, to avoid warpage.
Lightly lubed (not slathered) fasteners are much more repeatable, IMHO.


> > Why would dry threads be the most likely to give inaccurate torque??
>
> Engineers who tested this stuff emperically undoubtedly used oil to
> make them all the same. If one has a little oil in one spot and
> another has more in more spots how can you come up with a standard?
>
> This was probably more likely to have been prompted by the well known
> fact that dry metal to metal, high pressure contact will gall the
> thread surfaces causing all manner of problems so the light coating
> of oil prevents this and since most mechanics will put it together
> with oil on it anyway, why not make it all compatible??


Another couple of fine reasons to lube 'em up!


> What it boils down to is that most of the time you will have enough
> oil on them even if you wipe them off unless you spray or soak them
> in solvent so it works out most of the time eh? Where the extra
> consideration of the anti-seize comes in is that since it doesn't
> affect the torque spec since it is a lubricant like oil but is very
> difficult to wash off with anything it will stay on and prevent
> oxidation (rust0 in iron materials and electrolysis (corrosion) in
> dissimilar materials allowing you to get them back out when you want
> without breaking them off :-)
>
> Broncos really are supposed
> to have brakes aren't they?
>
> - -- Gary --

Gary--

Thank you for the most excellent discourse on the finer points of
lubrication!

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 18:47:50 -0500
From: Sleddog
Subject: RE: Torque Specifications Question

just a for example. ARP sends a lube with its bolts and you must use it, and many engines require a sealant on the head bolts.

sleddog

- ----------
From: Keith Srb[SMTP:herbie netvalue.net]
Sent: Friday, October 31, 1997 1:57 PM
To: fordtrucks61-79 ListService.net
Subject: Torque Specifications Question

I have heard from several people that it is unwise to put anything on the
treads of a bolt when you have to torque it to specification. These people
have told me that putting anything on the treads will give you inaccurate
torque readings. I.E. don't oil the treads in an attempt to make the bold
go in easier. Don't put anti-seize, lock tight, anything on them. Just use
a tap and die on the bolts and the bold holes to clean up and the treads.
>From what these people have told me, buy putting something on the threads,
you not reading the torque as being metal contacting metal. You have a thin
layer of non-metallic material between the bolts that will be "crushed" to
a certain extent? I wish I could remember how one person told it to me, it
would make it a lot easier to explain. Wait a minute, I think he said it
had something to due with Fluid Dynamics?


Comments anyone??

Later

Keith Srb herbie netvalue.net
Mesa, AZ
1986 Ford Bronco II, 2.9L (I HATE LITERS) V-6, Mitsubishi 5-Speed.
1980 Harley Davidson, XLH, Rebuilt from the frame up.
1974 Ford F250 Ranger XLT, 390ci 4bbl, Automatic, Long Box, Style Side.
1966 Ford F100, 240 C.I. Straight Six, Warner T-18 4-Speed, Short Box.
My Blood runs "TRUE BLUE FORD on Four Wheels and Pure HARLEY on Two Wheels!"







+-------------- Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1961 thru 1979 --------------+
| Send posts to fordtrucks61-79 listservice.net, |
| Send Unsubscribe requests to fordtrucks61-79-request listservice.net|
+---------- Visit Our Web Site: http://www.ford-trucks.com/ ----------+

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 18:57:13 -0500
From: Sleddog
Subject: RE: Torque Specifications Question

- ----------
From: deconblu[SMTP:deconblu gte.net]
Sent: Friday, October 31, 1997 2:08 PM
To: fordtrucks61-79 ListService.net
Subject: Re: Torque Specifications Question

Put anti-seize on it if you want it to come off again, loctite if you don't
and RTV for head bolts. If anything, dry threads will be the most likely to
give you an inaccurate torque.

>had something to due with Fluid Dynamics?

You must know Engineers! :)

maybe the ones that drive trains!! i'm an engineer, and in fact currently
most of my work is designing hydraulic torque wrenches from 500 to 80,000
lbs.ft. and tensioners from 150,000 lbs to 1,200,000 lbs of stretching
force. one thing is for sure in all applications - as the Deacon said, dry
threads give the most inaccurate readings. from some research done, there
is also a big difference between similiar lubes by different companies.
the only wway to get repeatable results is by using the exact same
lubricant each time. that is why ARP gives you lube with the bolts when
you buy them.

sleddog

Deacon Blues deconblu gte.net
================================================
Visit The Deacon Blues Homepage
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://home1.gte.net/deconblu/
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.dragonfire.net/~site/tbirdknights/

- -----Original Message-----
From: Keith Srb
To: fordtrucks61-79 ListService.net
Date: Friday, October 31, 1997 10:53 AM
Subject: Torque Specifications Question


>I have heard from several people that it is unwise to put anything on the
>treads of a bolt when you have to torque it to specification. These people
>have told me that putting anything on the treads will give you inaccurate
>torque readings. I.E. don't oil the treads in an attempt to make the bold
>go in easier. Don't put anti-seize, lock tight, anything on them. Just
use
>a tap and die on the bolts and the bold holes to clean up and the treads.
>From what these people have told me, buy putting something on the threads,
>you not reading the torque as being metal contacting metal. You have a
thin
>layer of non-metallic material between the bolts that will be "crushed" to
>a certain extent? I wish I could remember how one person told it to me, it
>would make it a lot easier to explain. Wait a minute, I think he said it
>had something to due with Fluid Dynamics?
>
>
>Comments anyone??
>
>Later
>
>Keith Srb herbie netvalue.net
>Mesa, AZ
>1986 Ford Bronco II, 2.9L (I HATE LITERS) V-6, Mitsubishi 5-Speed.
>1980 Harley Davidson, XLH, Rebuilt from the frame up.
>1974 Ford F250 Ranger XLT, 390ci 4bbl, Automatic, Long Box, Style Side.
>1966 Ford F100, 240 C.I. Straight Six, Warner T-18 4-Speed, Short Box.
>My Blood runs "TRUE BLUE FORD on Four Wheels and Pure HARLEY on Two
Wheels!"
>
>
>+-------------- Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1961 thru 1979 --------------+
>| Send posts to fordtrucks61-79 listservice.net, |
>| Send Unsubscribe requests to fordtrucks61-79-request listservice.net|
>+---------- Visit Our Web Site: http://www.ford-trucks.com/ ----------+







+-------------- Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1961 thru 1979 --------------+
| Send posts to fordtrucks61-79 listservice.net, |
| Send Unsubscribe requests to fordtrucks61-79-request listservice.net|
+---------- Visit Our Web Site: http://www.ford-trucks.com/ ----------+

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 19:11:16 -0500
From: Sleddog
Subject: RE: Torque Specifications Question

yes, a bolt is just a really tight spring. the idea is to stretch the bolt
(lke a spring) to a specific point where it provides the most clamping
force.

say, for example a bolt can take 500 lbs of force tension. and it is
holding 2 parts together which try to seperate at a force of 400 lbs. if
the bolt is tightened down enough that it is at the 400 or more lbs of
tension the parts will stay together. if the bolt is tightened to only 350
lbs, then the parts will seperate causing either faliure or the bolt to
back off more until failure occurs.

if OTOH the bolt is tightened to 550 lbs, then it is beyond it's yeild
point and has stetched, deforming the bolt and making it weaker, now only
being able to hold 70% of its rated capacity, causing failure again.

these are just sample numbers, and there is even more to the situation than
this, so i generalized and simplified things ALOT.

does this help any?

oh, also, bolt stetch is the best way to measure bolt load and instead of
twisting a bolt, the best wasy to tighten it is to stretch the bolt, turn
the nut down under low torque, and then relax the bolt. (this is call
tensioning). of course tensioning isn't really possible for us (on our
trucks), only for large steam turbines and such.

sleddog

- ----------
From: Keith Srb[SMTP:herbie netvalue.net]
Sent: Friday, October 31, 1997 2:47 PM
To: fordtrucks61-79 ListService.net
Subject: Re: Torque Specifications Question


Maybe I had better take one or two steps back and ask this question and see
if my thinking is right here or not. I thought that the reasons you
torqued bolts to specification, say on an intake manifold was to provide
even pressure from the manifold down onto the gasket and then down onto the
block, helping to prevent leaks, etc.

True or False? is there more to this that I am forgetting????

At 02:15 PM 10/31/97 +0000, you wrote:
>> Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 11:57:05 -0700
>> From: Keith Srb
>> Subject: Torque Specifications Question
>
>> I have heard from several people that it is unwise to put anything
>> on the treads of a bolt when you have to torque it to specification.
>> These people have told me that putting anything on the treads will
>> give you inaccurate torque readings. I.E. don't oil the treads in an
>
>Mechanics are being taught to use anti-seize on wheel lugs now when
>years ago it was thought that this would allow them to back off.
>Fact is it allows for more accurate torque so the DON'T back off :-)
>All torque specifications I'm aware of require "Lightly oiled
>threads" more is not better in this instance since once the metal is
>coated the extro doesn't do anything to make it more slippery.
>
>> me, it would make it a lot easier to explain. Wait a minute, I think
>> he said it had something to due with Fluid Dynamics?
>
>If, OTOH, you try to soak the threads and put it into a blind hole
>you can indeed have a hydrostatic lock prevening accurate torqueing
>of that bolt when the excess oil fills up the hole before the bolt is
>all the way in so take care not to let that happen, blow all blind
>holes out before you insert the bolt with anti-seize or oil on it and
>you will be right on the money every time :-)
>
>One place I found that anti-seize can be a problem is on sheet metal
>threads. Since there is only one thread and poorly supported the
>lube can allow you to over torque very easily so care must be
>exercised here since they usually aren't torqued but just tightened
>by feel. The lube messes up your feel.
>
>Broncos really are supposed
>to have brakes aren't they?
>
>-- Gary --
>+-------------- Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1961 thru 1979 --------------+
>| Send posts to fordtrucks61-79 listservice.net, |
>| Send Unsubscribe requests to fordtrucks61-79-request listservice.net|
>+---------- Visit Our Web Site: http://www.ford-trucks.com/ ----------+
>
Keith Srb herbie netvalue.net
Mesa, AZ
1986 Ford Bronco II, 2.9L (I HATE LITERS) V-6, Mitsubishi 5-Speed.
1980 Harley Davidson, XLH, Rebuilt from the frame up.
1974 Ford F250 Ranger XLT, 390ci 4bbl, Automatic, Long Box, Style Side.
1966 Ford F100, 240 C.I. Straight Six, Warner T-18 4-Speed, Short Box.
My Blood runs "TRUE BLUE FORD on Four Wheels and Pure HARLEY on Two
Wheels!"








+-------------- Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1961 thru 1979 --------------+
| Send posts to fordtrucks61-79 listservice.net, |
| Send Unsubscribe requests to fordtrucks61-79-request listservice.net|
+---------- Visit Our Web Site: http://www.ford-trucks.com/ ----------+

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 20:06:59 -0500
From: Ken Payne
Subject: ADMIN: List of people who got stickers

At the bottom of this message is a list of all those who got static
window stickers. This does not include orders which I got out of
the PO box today. Those will get sent out tomorrow or Monday. This
list includes people who ordered stickers or donated in the past to
keep us alive. If I missed anyone or got the amount wrong let me
know. Please be honest about this, the list isn't broke but it does
run on a shoe-string budget. I only sent 1 sticker to donators as
I didn't keep names cross-referenced with amounts unless it was an
order (so I wouldn't play favorites with list members).

Also, I'd like to propose a slight price increase. Envelopes big
enough to mail the stickers without folding them cost us an
additional $26 and we spent over $15 in postage over the week.

This brings the total bill to:
Stickers (plus tax) $149.80
Postage $ 15.00
Envelopes (500, they'll last a while) $ 26.42
---------------------------------------------
$191.22

That comes to $1.91 per sticker not including posting for the
ones which haven't been sent yet.

This figure goes down tremendously with the next batch as the
envelopes are paid for and the screen layout costs are covered.
I'm looking at roughly $1.00 profit per sticker, with all money
made going towards list expenses. Here's the increase I would
like to propose:

1 sticker $ 3.50
2 stickers $ 6.75
3 stickers $10.00
4 or more $ 3.00 each

These prices take into account postage. Let me know what you think.
As always, I like to keep the money matters in the open. I'm due
to post another full accounting of our expenses, donations, sticker
orders and advertiser income (not a large amount).

Ken
Administrator,
Ford Truck Enthusiasts

Here's the list in no particular order:
Clay Hughes 2
Robert Johnson 1
Christian Thompson 2
Tom Nickolson 2
Brian Milbrandt 2
Azie Magnusson 1
Fred Myers 2
Eric Kulig 1
Robert Smallwood 1
Gary Tracyzk 1
Tony Boykin 2
Steve Delanty 3
Thomas Stoner 1
John Niolon 1
Jon Purut 2
John & Dorothy Fleming 1
Woody Friesen 1
Don Lewis 1
Randy Collins 1
DC Beaty 1
Michael Schwall 1
Nathan Iven 1
Joseph Mead 2
George Wheeler 5
Michael Ruth 3
Dale Goodwin 3
Stu Varner 1
J Perkins 1
John Strauss 1
Jim Strigas 1
Lee Hardy 1
Halvar Forsberg 1
Paul Gayda 1
David Reynolds 1

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 15:39:18 -0800
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: Re: Torque Specifications Question

>I have heard from several people that it is unwise to put anything on the
>treads of a bolt when you have to torque it to specification. These people
>have told me that putting anything on the treads will give you inaccurate
>torque readings. I.E. don't oil the treads in an attempt to make the bold
>go in easier. Don't put anti-seize, lock tight, anything on them. Just use
>a tap and die on the bolts and the bold holes to clean up and the treads.
>From what these people have told me, buy putting something on the threads,
>you not reading the torque as being metal contacting metal. You have a thin
>layer of non-metallic material between the bolts that will be "crushed" to
>a certain extent? I wish I could remember how one person told it to me, it
>would make it a lot easier to explain. Wait a minute, I think he said it
>had something to due with Fluid Dynamics?

Bolts that are lubed have less thread friction and will end up
"a little tighter" for a given torque than non-lubed threads.
Unfortunately, many bolts need some thread sealant to keep them
from oozing oil, coolant, whatever.
IMHO it's crazy to put bolts in dry, cuz You may not get them back
out again next year...
I use thread sealant where required, and loctite where applicable.
All else gets a nice coat of never-seize, but I almost never put
a bolt in dry. Especially if You put a steel bolt into an aluminum
casting. Without some never-seize, electrolysis will eventually
"weld" aluminum and steel together and cause no end of grief...
I buy never-seize in 1/2 pint cans and use it religiously.
I've never had problems by "overtorquing" bolts that were coated
with sealant or lubricant, but I've had LOTS of (serious) trouble with
bolts that broke off during removal cuz some shmuck put them in "dry".
During nearly 2 decades of industrial mechanics and/or automotive work
I've been screwed by dry bolts *way* too many times.
My personal opinion is thread seal it, loctite it, or never-seize it,
but *never* do 'em dry...

Happy halloween,

Steve Delanty

Measure it with a micrometer,
mark it with chalk,
cut it with an axe...

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 18:29:18 -0800
From: "deconblu"
Subject: I'm back and smiling like a fool!

Hi Gang!
I just got home with the F372. When it first started, it smoked but once
it was on the road it stopped smoking and ran great. The ride wasn't what I
had expected. I thought it was going to be a kidney buster but it was firm
and comfortable. There are no rattles. I was expecting there would be some
with all the doors on the utility bed . The trans code is G so I was wrong
saying it was a C6 it's a C4 with a 360, 137" wheelbase and 8050 GVW. I'll
take some Polaroid's of it tomorrow and I am hoping to have a Webpage for it
by Sunday. The ammeter doesn't work. Does anyone know how to fix it? :) All
the other gauges work. I need to rob some stuff off the F100 then more than
likely sell it.
Well I got to say I'm happy with this truck. One of the first times I've
bought a vehicle and not wonder if I paid to much for it. Looking through
the truck trader I can't find anything like this truck for what I paid for
it. $1200 don't get you much and I got a great truck for it!
Happy Halloween!


Deacon Blues deconblu gte.net
================================================
Visit The Deacon Blues Homepage
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://home1.gte.net/deconblu/
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.dragonfire.net/~site/tbirdknights/

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 21:35:28 -0500 (EST)
From: Bill03bt aol.com
Subject: Torque Specs

I've been reading this discussion with interest.
Torque standards are defined using threads lubricated with "a light coating "
of 10w oil. There are exceptions to this in certain special applications, so
read the manual for your specific circumstances.
I have always just used motor oil on the bolts and have had no problems, like
a lot of you I'm sure.
I do, however use Never-Seize on exhaust manifold bolts/studs/nuts. This is
primarily for the hi-temp protection. One word of advice however, a little
goes a long way and more is not better. If you really slather the stuff on,
it WILL allow the fasteners to loosen up as it is much thicker than oil and
will not flow out of the threads easily.
Enough of that, but I would like to toss out a new related topic.
What types of torque wrenches do/have you used? Any preferences, etc. I did a
lot of research into this several years ago at work so feel free to email me
privately with specific questions. This might be a topic of interest to the
group though.

Bil03bt aol.com
96 Ranger Supercab 3.0

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 19:00:16 -0800
From: "deconblu"
Subject: Re: Torque Specifications Question

>>had something to due with Fluid Dynamics?
>
>You must know Engineers! :)
>
>maybe the ones that drive trains!! i'm an engineer,

I meant a Mechanic would have said it will torque but when the oil
squishes out the bolt will be loose. An Engineer would say Fluid Dynamics.
Sorry Sleddog I didn't mean to imply anything negative about Engineers! :)
Hey, I think I could be a politician! :)

Deacon Blues deconblu gte.net
================================================
Visit The Deacon Blues Homepage
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://home1.gte.net/deconblu/
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.dragonfire.net/~site/tbirdknights/

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 22:08:53 EST
From: A66f100
Subject: 66 f100 dash

Hello everyone, My truck had a padded dash that was in really bad shape. I
pulled it off and to my surprise the metal dash underneath looked like brand
new. I wondered if the padded dash was a factory item or aftermarket for the
time as the paint on the dash matched the way the rest of my truck looked at
one time. Either way is there someone who still makes replacement padded dash
covers? Thanks, Mike B.

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 21:13:33 -0600
From: "Dale and Donna Carmine"
Subject: Oxygen Sensor/Meter

List,
I'm interested in trying one of the retrofit oxygen sensor systems that
light a series of LEDs depending on the exhaust oxygen content. Seems like
everyone (Cyberdyne, Holley, Edelbrock, etc.) is making one. The unit
comes with a bung that must be welded into the exhaust pipe in order to
mount the oxygen sensor and a small display unit that can be mounted
anywhere on/under the dash. My objective is to be able to dial in the
carburetor much more accurately throughout the range of driving conditions
for better driveabilty and economy. Has anyone out there tried one of
these things?

.........and my related question........my '79 F-150, 351M, has air
injection. Seems to me that the air injected into the exhaust manifold....


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