From: owner-61-79-list-digest ford-trucks.com (61-79-list-digest)
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Subject: 61-79-list-digest V3 #465
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61-79-list-digest Saturday, December 18 1999 Volume 03 : Number 465



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Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1961-1979 Trucks and Vans
Visit our web site: http://www.ford-trucks.com/
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In this issue:

Re: FTE 61-79 - weird sights
FTE 61-79 - Free shipping on the web site
Re: FTE 61-79 - Boring
Re: FTE 61-79 - plug wires
FTE 61-79 - RE: wierd sights and sounds
Re: FTE 61-79 - Suspention modification
Re: FTE 61-79 - plug wires
Re: FTE 61-79 - plug wires
Re: FTE 61-79 - ENVY'S FIRST "OWWIE"
FTE 61-79 - RE: Plug wires...

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Date: Fri, 17 Dec 1999 15:38:49 -0700
From: "Kiernan, Denny"
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - weird sights

This same thing happened to a cab driver friend of mine. He was on the
freeway when a tire passed him. He thought, "Gee, someone's in trouble,"
before it became apparent from the feel of the cab that it might be him.

Brad Smith wrote:
> Just thought I would add a funny story here... I had a friend helping me do
> brakes on my 78 once, and well, he didn't tighten his side down all the way,
> guess he thought I was gonna come over there with the gun and zip his side
> down too... I didn't... Drove probably 50-60 miles before the left rear came
> off... It was the funniest thing I have ever seen. I was coming to a stop,
> and the sucker jumps off, hits the wheel well in the rear, and takes off at
> about 50 mph... If you've never seen a 33" tire screaming down the street,
> you don't know what you've missed... The thing rolled for a good 1/2 mile...
> NO JOKE!! The road finally took a bend and it went up and embankment and
> stopped. I had to get a ride to go get my tire!! No major damage othre
> than wheel studs...Wasn't quite as funny then, but is hilarious now...
> Brad
>
> == FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html
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Date: Fri, 17 Dec 1999 19:27:13 -0500
From: Ken Payne
Subject: FTE 61-79 - Free shipping on the web site

Hi gang,

As many of you know, we've purchased a new high powered web server
that will be online by Jan 1, 2000. In order to help cover the
expenses, we're introducing a special offer to drive business on
the web store. NOW THROUGH DECEMBER 24TH, ALL SHIPPING IS FREE!
All books, manuals and decals are available immediate shipping.
Most large items are available for immediate drop-shipping.

http://www.ford-trucks.com

Happy holidays!
Ken Payne
Admin, Ford Truck Enthusiasts


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Date: Fri, 17 Dec 1999 20:10:55 EST
From: TBeeee aol.com
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - Boring

In a message dated 12/17/99 5:02:40 PM Eastern Standard Time,
fishinbrad mindspring.com writes:

>
> Just remember that honing does nothing but exand the cylinder that you
> have, if you are out of round now, honing it .005 is just going to give you
> a 5 thousandths larger egg shaped cylinder...

That is true if you use the typical "glaze-breaker" which is passed off
as a cylinder hone. A professional mandrel-type hone will help true up some
of that out-of round.

Stock Man
1967 Galaxie 500 Convertible (HELP!---I need 15 x5 factory rims)
1967 F-250 FE 390 4wd
1966 F-250 I6 240 2wd LWB Flare Side
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.hometown.aol.com/tbeeee

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Date: Fri, 17 Dec 1999 17:57:39 -0800
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - plug wires

Brad wrote:
>Actually if you think about it, the looms (even the cheap factory ones) keep
>the wires at least 1-2 mm apart. As we all know, the spark is going to take
>the path of least resistance, so that means the wire would have to have a
>1-2 mm break internally somewhere... That is a big break!

Welll, it's not *quite* that simple...
The electricity does indeed take the path of least resistance, but
the catch is that the spark plug gap is part of that resistance, and
the breakdown voltage of the plug gap is dependant on the width of the
gap *and* the air pressure in the gap.
It takes MUCH more voltage to fire a spark plug when it's under pressure
at the top of the compression stroke than it does to fire one that's
somewhere else in the cycle and isn't under pressure.

With old, cracked, decrepit plug wires, it's not uncommon to see a
spark jump 1/2" to another wire, even though it *seems* like it would
be much easier for it to just jump the .045" gap on it's own plug,
rather than jump a large distance to another wire and then still have
to jump the plug gap on that wire.

It takes several times more voltage to jump a .045" gap at 200PSI
than it does to jump the same gap at atmospheric pressure.
That's one of the nasty, insidious things about crossfiring... it's
very easy for it to occur, because you're always trying to fire a
cylinder that's got high pressure in it (near TDC) and that's
always THE hardest plug gap to jump. All the other plugs have less
pressure around their gaps, so they're MUCH easier to fire.

Somewhere on the web there's a site that describes the physics
of electric discharge, and some of the math for determining the
minimum breakdown voltage of a spark gap and how it relates to
pressure.
I don't seem to have it bookmarked, but consider (to see how much
difference pressure makes) that if you take a long piece of glass
tubing and seal some electrodes into each end and then reduce the
atmospheric air pressure in the tube down to about 10 millimeters
of mercury (1 atmosphere = aprox 14.7psi, or 760 mm.Hg.), a mere
5000 volts is sufficient to reliably cause an electric discharge
through a tube over 10 feet long!
At atmosheric pressure, that same 5000 volts isn't nearly enough to
jump an inch, and at the 150-200 psi likely to be encountered in a
cylinder at TDC on compression stroke that 5000 volts probably wont
even jump a .035" gap!

Never underestimate the ability of a spark to find the "easy way"
to ground, and quite often the easy way is NOT buy jumping the spark
plug you would like it to.. )-:

Then there's the matter of induced currents...
Even with plug wires that are *perfect insulators*, it's STILL
possible to fire a plug with energy not intended to go to it.

When a plug is fired and current is flowing thru a wire, a magnetic
field builds up around the wire. When the current stops flowing,
this magnetic field collapses. This changing magnetic field actually
causes a voltage to be built up in wires near it. This phenomenon is
what makes generators and alternators possible...
If a plug wire is in very close proximity to another one that has
current flowing thru it, enough voltage can be induced into it to
jump the plug gap on the plug connected to that wire. Not only have
you just fired the plug you intended to, but you fired a second plug
at the same time... no extra charge! (-:
The second spark may be weak, but if it's enough to get the fire lit
even weakly in a cylinder you didn't intend... well, you lose, try
again next cycle.

The effects from magnetic induction drop off as the square of the
distance betwen the wires, so doubling the distance decreases
your probability for trouble by 4.
Note that that's the distnce between the actual conductors, not
the distance between the insulated wires.
If you have two 8mm wires, with a conductor diameter of 1mm.
(a 1mm conductor with 3.5mm of insulation all the way around it for
a total diameter of 8mm) If the wires are touching, there is 7mm. of
space between the conductors. If you now space the wires so there
is a mere 7mm of space between them, you now have 14 mm of space
between the conductors and you've doubled the effective distance.
You've just cut your potential for induced crossfire by a factor
of 4. Double the space between conductors again to 28mm and you've
reduced the possibility of induced trouble by 16.

With old style points-type ignition systems, you can often get
away with murder, but with more modern electronic ignitions the
curents involved increase, and the speed with which the magnetic
field around a plug wire changes is also increased and the possibilty
for trouble from induced currents can be a serious problem.

A lot of modern OEM motors are getting around some of these problems
by going to "coil on plug" systems that eliminate the distributor
and plug wires completely. One ignition coil for each spark plug,
mounted as close to the plug as possible...

I've seen enough motors that just weren't "quite right", motors that
had a certain subtle roughness or stumble under certain conditions,
and were totally cured by rerouting wires and spacing them correctly,
that I'm a firm believer in intelligent plug wire routing and good
wire looms...

> Looms not only look good, but perform an important function....
>Brad

Brad speaks good words of wisdom here!


Steve
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.sonic.net/~sdelanty

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Date: Fri, 17 Dec 1999 21:17:51 -0500
From: "George W. Selby, III"
Subject: FTE 61-79 - RE: wierd sights and sounds

Leaving the snap ring off the axle can result in the hub completely
fragmenting, which in turn ruins the stub axle. I have had this happen to
me in a Jeep Cherokee (Dana 44 front.) You may need a thinner snap ring to
facilitate installation, in my Warn Premium Rebuild Kit, I seem to remember
there being two thicknesses of snap rings included.

George Selby
78 F-150 400M, 4 on floor, 4x4
86 Nissan 300ZX
82 Jeep Cherokee
85 Dodge W-100
digiman ibox.net









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Date: Fri, 17 Dec 1999 18:58:48 -0800 (PST)
From: canzus seanet.com
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - Suspention modification

At 11:45 PM 14:12:99 EST, JJJJJGRANT aol.com wrote:
>how low do you want to go? a friend of mine did a axle over spring swap, it
>required welding on new spring perches and he ordered dropped I beams for the
>front, it was sitting in the dirt.

Part numbers, do you have part numbers??

I'm considering dropping my '68.....

Steve & the Rockette
68 F100, 390cid, FMX
63 F100, 292cid, 3speed
72 Capri 2000, hers
73 Capri 2600,tube frame going in.....
73 MGB GT, Our Toy
94 SHO, SWMBO's
98 Contour SVT, Mine, Mine, All Mine....

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Date: Fri, 17 Dec 1999 18:59:27 -0800 (PST)
From: canzus seanet.com
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - plug wires

At 09:41 AM 17:12:99 -0800, Bill Beyer wrote:
>Actually zip ties can make very good wire looms if used correctly.

Yeah, *BUT* dont forget to clip the tails of the zip ties, looks
silly if you dont.....


>"If you can't dazzle them with brilliance, riddle them with bullets"

Or: "Vote from the rooftops..."



Steve & the Rockette
68 F100, 390cid, FMX
63 F100, 292cid, 3speed
72 Capri 2000, hers
73 Capri 2600,tube frame going in.....
73 MGB GT, Our Toy
94 SHO, SWMBO's
98 Contour SVT, Mine, Mine, All Mine....

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Date: Fri, 17 Dec 1999 19:04:32 -0800
From: "Bill Beyer"
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - plug wires

Yeah I guess I assumed that most folks on this list would do that!

"If you can't dazzle them with brilliance, riddle them with bullets"


- ----- Original Message -----
From:
To:
Cc:
Sent: Friday, December 17, 1999 6:59 PM
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - plug wires


> At 09:41 AM 17:12:99 -0800, Bill Beyer wrote:
> >Actually zip ties can make very good wire looms if used correctly.
>
> Yeah, *BUT* dont forget to clip the tails of the zip ties, looks
> silly if you dont.....
>
>
> >"If you can't dazzle them with brilliance, riddle them with bullets"
>
> Or: "Vote from the rooftops..."



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Date: Sat, 18 Dec 1999 01:12:58 EST
From: SevnD2 aol.com
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - ENVY'S FIRST "OWWIE"

In a message dated 12/17/1999 6:36:40 PM Eastern Standard Time,
Bad4dFilly aol.com writes:


*whew*> but the lady pretty much "Taco-ed" the back end of her van
went under my bumper> Just goes to show ya "Ford-Tuff!" >>

Ok , I know I am going to ask a stupid question but . What does Taco-ed mean?
:-) I am sorry about your accident . :-( I hope your truck ... I mean you
are ok ! ;-)

Rollie .
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Date: Fri, 17 Dec 1999 23:05:26 -0800
From: Tim Neasham
Subject: FTE 61-79 - RE: Plug wires...

Hiya everyone. Most of you won't remember, or don't care, but I'm back on
the list. Had to take a leave of absence due to a lack of a truck. My
faithful '74 F-250 has moved to the big parking lot in the sky. I was
driving home from work late one night and heard a loud *BANG*. Kinda like
the sound you here when you run over something. Well, that something just
happened to be a foot long chunk of angle iron that punch a hole in the gas
tank. As I was braking to pull over, the truck backfired (which if often
did) and all of a sudden, I was a flaming Ford. Let me tell you how scary
it is to look in the mirror and see LARGE FLAMES following you down the
road. The truck was a total loss and I've since been Ford-less. Well that
just changed. I picked up a '69 F-250 off a friend in Seattle, so I'm
baaaaaaack. :)

Now, onto the real subject of plug wires and looms. I see everyone is
complaining about not being able to find 9mm looms. A cheap and easy fix
for ya'll. Go to the local parts house and pick up two sets of the Accel
wire looms. They're available in Black, Blue, Red, and Yellow (I
think.) Now go find a LARGE Phillips head screwdriver (about 9mm
diameter.) Take a propane torch, oxy-acetylene torch or other suitable
heat source and heat the end of the screwdriver. If you're careful, you
can slide the now hot screwdriver into the hole, thus enlarging the
"factory" 8mm hole to 9mm After the loom cools off, take a razor blade and
scrape all the built up goo off the looms and voila, a 9mm loom. If you....


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