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Subject: 61-79-list-digest V3 #446
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61-79-list-digest Friday, December 3 1999 Volume 03 : Number 446



=======================================================================
Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1961-1979 Trucks and Vans
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In this issue:

RE: FTE 61-79 - 4x4 vans
RE: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump
RE: FTE 61-79 - Fuel system Springs was Electric Fuel Pump
RE: FTE 61-79 - Re: Apprenticeship
Re: FTE 61-79 - 390 HEADS for 360 motor/Clutch Surface
RE: FTE 61-79 - /Clutch Surface
RE: FTE 61-79 - Capacities
Re: FTE 61-79 - 390 HEADS for 360 motor
RE: FTE 61-79 - Snake oil and spark plugs (Capacities)
FTE 61-79 - Cummins turbo in a Ford
RE: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump
RE: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump
RE: FTE 61-79 - Brake problem
Re: FTE 61-79 - Zero Oil Pressure
RE: FTE 61-79 - Happy Diesel Owner
FTE 61-79 - Hesitation
FTE 61-79 - 460 timing
FTE 61-79 - Warm Air
RE: FTE 61-79 - 460 timing
Re: FTE 61-79 - mech fuel pump repair
RE: FTE 61-79 - Fuel system Springs was Electric Fuel Pump
RE: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump
Re: FTE 61-79 - Engine Paint
Re: FTE 61-79 - Re: Water heated 4v carb spacer
Re: FTE 61-79 - Clutch Spring Failure
RE: FTE 61-79 - 460 timing
RE: FTE 61-79 - Fuel system Springs was Electric Fuel Pump
FTE 61-79 - engine dieing
RE: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump
RE: FTE 61-79 - engine dieing
FTE 61-79 - Belly up
RE: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump
Re: FTE 61-79 - engine dieing
RE: FTE 61-79 - engine dieing
RE: FTE 61-79 - Fuel system Springs was Electric Fuel Pump
Re: FTE 61-79 - engine dieing

=======================================================================

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 06:20:15 -0500
From: "Peters, Gary (G.R.)"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - 4x4 vans

Jeff, A tear still comes to my eye when I think about mine. I still have
his heart in the barn. All the drive line components are stored away for
another project and the 460 engine is in my pickup now but the memory will
never die of that faithful beast :-( (75 short box E-150) I love my bronco
but it doesn't have the same personality the van had :-( I built it from
scratch with bronco parts and called it my long wheel base bronco :-)

Many people dont' know that a van has a much stronger frame than a pickup of
the same capacity so makes a very durable, sturdy 4x4 :-)

- --
Michigan, Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.thewowfactor.com/bigbroncos/detail.cfm?detailid=167
- --

> For as long as I can remember, I have wanted a 4x4 Ford van.

> current 4x4 which I found on the internet. Scooby was too nice
> to pass up, so I drove him 2000+ miles back home to Houston.
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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 06:26:25 -0500
From: "Peters, Gary (G.R.)"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump

Zzzzzacktly :-)

- --
Michigan, Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.thewowfactor.com/bigbroncos/detail.cfm?detailid=167
- --

> just saying they will generate a pressure difference, and if
> the one side is
> raised the other side MAY follow suit depending on design and
> location of
> various regulators and check valves ?
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Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 06:40:58 -0500
From: "Peters, Gary (G.R.)"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Fuel system Springs was Electric Fuel Pump

Chris, I agree with you when refering to a "regulator" but I was refering to
a pump which is not necessarily refernecing the input pressure in any way
and has no built in regulator mechanism or balance valve etc.. If none of
the pumps operate as simply as I imagined then I agree with you but......:-)

Welding regulators and any sophisticated regulators do not just look at
ambient, it also references the input pressure to balance the system.
Regulators look at some other pressure source to balance the regulator valve
which floats between this and the output pressure it is set at but if you
just use a spring.....assuming ambient will always be nearly 14 psi then you
can make a very cheap pump which cannot produce more than 7 psi under
"normal" conditions but if it is a simple spring pressure pump, that is
compress the spring and let the spring do the work of pumping to the output
side then if you raise the input side above the design parameters (14 psi)
you will also increase the potential "total" force applied to the diaphram.

This may all be hog wash if there are no pumps made like this, I'm just
theorizing :-)

- --
Michigan, Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.thewowfactor.com/bigbroncos/detail.cfm?detailid=167
- --

> Gary,
> I must take issue with the above statement.
> If a spring is used as you described, reaches it's knee point at 7 PSI
> output pressure from the pump, then that is all the more
> pressure that it
> will give period.
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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 06:49:03 -0500
From: "Peters, Gary (G.R.)"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Re: Apprenticeship

I don't know how old you are Pat but.......my projects sometimes reach the
critical stage and I have to give in.....:-( (not very often though :-)) In
my case it's usually the learning curve that makes the decision for me :-)
Instead of setting up my own 10' dish I paid the local dish guy to do it for
me. Took him a couple of hours to do what I'd have spent days researching
and may still have made some mistakes. I've determined that I only have so
much time to devote to learning new tricks so I have to keep them within a
certain scope :-) I don't do front end alignements either :-) (except toe
:-))

BTW, If I have to do another one......I know how to do it now so.....:-)

- --
Michigan, Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.thewowfactor.com/bigbroncos/detail.cfm?detailid=167
- --

> I vowed I'll never be to busy to fix something myself :-)
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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 05:58:18 -0700
From: "Michael White"
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - 390 HEADS for 360 motor/Clutch Surface

> All I want is the heads ($225.00 pr) and
> intake ($100.00). My question is this, Will these 390 heads work ok on my
> 76 360? I know they will bolt on, just not sure of the performance. The
> owner of the machine shop stated he had no idea what year or vehicle this
> motor came out of.
> TIA
> Rich Thomas
>
> PS: I just purchase a Borg Warner clutch and pressure plate for my truck.
> The clutch is copper clad and has several pieces which look like brake
pads
> attatched to it instead of the usual flat material like every other clutch
> Ive seen all my life. The "pads" are supposed to have kevlar impegnated
in
> them. Before I put this in, anyone have any experience with this setup?
> Good or bad.
.................

The heads will bolt up without a problem, but I'd be concerned about the
combustion chamber volume as it has a direct effect on the compression
ratio. Perhaps you could obtain the casting number from between the center
spark plugs on each head and reply with the info. Many members of this list
including myself can quickly decipher those numbers for you.
The clutch you purchased sounds alot like the CenterForce dual friction.
Since it has about twice the holding force of a stock clutch it took awhile
to learn how to drive it under normal street use without slipping it or
lurching forwards. If memory serves correctly, not all of the extra holding
force was from increase spring pressure, but that the surface of the clutch
itself provided a little extra as well. Extra holding force above stock
specs works great for towing heavy loads or aggressive street driving while
empty, but I honestly wouldn't recommend it for normal street use.

Danger
danger csolutions.net


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Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 08:16:32 -0500
From: "Peters, Gary (G.R.)"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - /Clutch Surface

Yeah, well I'd take it over what I have now :-( Nearly got creamed pulling
out in front of a semi shortly after I installed it because it would not
hook up in third at WOT. Had to back of to get it hooked up and then it was
too late, he was on my tail and not very happy :-(

You guys with 351m and 400's, don't use the cheap, light duty clutch the
books say will fit. It will bolt to the flywheel but is not adequate for
these engines in a heavy truck. (or car either for that matter ) FYI, I
resurfaced the flywheel, cleaned it before installing the disk and pressure
plate so it was not contamination, it was a darned weak pressure plate,
that's all :-(

There's rebuilt and then there's REBUILT so let the buyer beware! That's a
lot of work to have it come out like that :-( My next one will be an after
market HD unit of some kind FOR SURE!

- --
Michigan, Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.thewowfactor.com/bigbroncos/detail.cfm?detailid=167
- --

> Since it has about twice the holding force of a stock clutch
> it took awhile
> to learn how to drive it under normal street use without
> slipping it or
> lurching forwards.

> specs works great for towing heavy loads or aggressive street
> driving while
> empty, but I honestly wouldn't recommend it for normal street use.
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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 08:27:33 -0500
From: tfreeman murphyfarms.com
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Capacities

I run platinums in everything I own. I don't get any performance gain from it,
but I don't have the plug fouling problem that I have with standard plugs. On
my daily drivers, I don't worry so much, because it runs enough to keep the
plugs cleans, but on my other 3 vehicles that only get started and run once or
twice a month I have the problem.

Anyways....that's why I run platinums.

- -Ted





canzus seanet.com on 12/02/99 11:05:26 PM

Please respond to 61-79-list ford-trucks.com

To: 61-79-list ford-trucks.com
cc: "'61-79-list ford-trucks.com'" (bcc: Ted
Freeman/MURPHY_FAMILY_FARMS)
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Capacities



At 01:51 PM 2:12:99 -0500, Peters, Gary (G.R.) wrote:

>
>Platinum plugs were invented for EFI, lean burn engines which also typically
>have better ignition systems (hotter spark) because of hotter combustion
>temps and drier conditions the plugs don't foul so easily so last longer but
>the electrodes still erode at the same or even faster rate in these engines.

As Rockette's Uncle Bob says;

"platinum plugs won't improve the performance of any stock style ignition,
Period. *BUT* if you're running 12:1 compression or higher, with a super
high output coil and big gaps on racing fuels, you'll see an improvement
with most of the platinum plugs that are available today...."

I tend to believe what Uncle Bob says, He's been wrenching exotics for
35 years.

Steve & the Rockette
68 F100, 390cid, FMX
63 F100, 292cid, 3speed
72 Capri 2000, hers
73 Capri 2600,tube frame going in.....
73 MGB GT, Our Toy
94 SHO, SWMBO's
98 Contour SVT, Mine, Mine, All Mine....

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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 08:40:19 -0500
From: tfreeman murphyfarms.com
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - 390 HEADS for 360 motor

The heads will work. If they are standard 390 heads you shouldn't have any
problems. If they are the 390GT type head, you compression may go up and may
start pinging. I doubt if that will be the case on a '76 motor. I think by
then, the C/R had dropped.

The only other thing to watch for is to make sure of the valve size. If
standard sized 390 vavles were used, there's no problem. But if the 406, 427
and some 428 vavles were used you may have to chamfer the cylinder head to get
proper vavle to cylinder clearance.

Steve Christ book list the cylinder heads by part number, with the CC's and
vavle sizes. I would recommend getting this book. "How to rebuild you Big
Block Ford" By knowing and comparing the part numbers with his book, you can
mix and match with confidence.

- -Ted





"Rich" on 12/02/99 11:18:14 PM

Please respond to 61-79-list ford-trucks.com

To: 61-79-list ford-trucks.com
cc: (bcc: Ted Freeman/MURPHY_FAMILY_FARMS)
Subject: FTE 61-79 - 390 HEADS for 360 motor



Hello friends,
last year I posted a question about replacement steering parts for my 76
F250 HiBoy 4X4. I replaced every component (gear box, cylinder, contol
valve, pump and hoses) and it works fine, well, it works anyway :). Thanks
CJ for the help\advice\source! I'm just finishing up the engine rebuild on
my son's mustang, and while at the machine shop, I asked if they had any
36090 parts laying around for sale. The owner told me he has a complete
390 engine for sale, disassembled, all machine work done, for $1100.00.
This includes all new parts, new headers, and an eldelblock intake still in
the box. He said the customer put up half the money for a rebuild over 2
years ago and never came back. All I want is the heads ($225.00 pr) and
intake ($100.00). My question is this, Will these 390 heads work ok on my
76 360? I know they will bolt on, just not sure of the performance. The
owner of the machine shop stated he had no idea what year or vehicle this
motor came out of. My heads are so worn, I get exhaust gas blowing past the
valve guides. (trust me) I'm going to meet him to look at and possibly
purchase these parts saturday morning, so a quick responce will be
appreciated from one of you FTE GURU'S. I've learned a lot from this list
the past couple of years, but don't remember a question like this being
posted. I'm on digest mode so I'll give my email address for hopefully a
quick responce. richth mindspring.com

TIA
Rich Thomas

PS: I just purchase a Borg Warner clutch and pressure plate for my truck.
The clutch is copper clad and has several pieces which look like brake pads
attatched to it instead of the usual flat material like every other clutch
Ive seen all my life. The "pads" are supposed to have kevlar impegnated in
them. Before I put this in, anyone have any experience with this setup?
Good or bad.

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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 08:43:03 -0500
From: "Peters, Gary (G.R.)"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Snake oil and spark plugs (Capacities)

My only recommendation for the platinums would be for longevity in newer,
electronic and EFI engines, not for performance gains. Guess I didn't
explain myself well enough :-) Basically you don't gain "performance" with
any of them except in very arcane setups with super lean or super high
compression which will then respond to certain treatments such as circular
spark (assuming you have enough power to generate that kind of spark) etc..

High compression will "supresss" the spark by increasing the resistance of
the gap and lean mixtures have molecules further apart so fewer will be in
the vicinity of the spark unless you make the spark "larger" by increasing
the gap or the spark width or adding more spark electrodes etc..

In low efficiency systems like the old points setups, helical wound wires
with non-resistance, copper electrode plugs will undoubtedly help some and
in newer engines, the hotter you can get the spark the leaner you can run it
and the higher the compression you can run but the plug itself has little to
do with it as long as it generates the proper sized and duration spark UNDER
THE CONDITIONS PRESENT IN THE ENGINE which actually has more to do with the
generation portion (coil and module) of the system. (and is in the correct
heat range of course :-)) Platinum plugs in older engines are probably more
likely to cause a loss in performance if any change is noticed at all IMHO.
The platinum plugs actually require more power to operate correctly I've
been told.

- --
Michigan, Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.thewowfactor.com/bigbroncos/detail.cfm?detailid=167
- --

> "platinum plugs won't improve the performance of any stock
> style ignition,
> Period.
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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 03 Dec 1999 07:02:23 -0600
From: "John LaGrone"
Subject: FTE 61-79 - Cummins turbo in a Ford

>>John,
False alert. Ford put Cummins 4BT's in E350 cube vans, A 6BT may be a
stretch, but same engine family. I've looked into the 4BT swap because
nobody makes a diesel 1/2 ton with about a 4 liter turbo diesel. That's
really what I could use, but couldn't cost justify it. A Powerstroke 7.3
is overkill for me.

OK, I surrender. I still personally don't like deisels, but I see their
value to others. Sounds like an interesting project.

- -- John
jlagrone ford-trucks.com
1979 F150 Custom LWB Regular Cab 351M C6 (Henry)
http://www.ford-trucks.com/jlagrone/henry.home.htm
Dearborn iron rules!!!!
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Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 05:51:41 -0800
From: "Hogan, Tom"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump

I don't know how hard it is to draw fuel through an electric pump if it is
not operational. I do know that the way mechanical fuel pumps are designed
they won't last long if the input (suction) side is blocked. They are
designed to run indefinately with the output (pressure) side blocked of (as
in the carb needle and seat assy). I found this out on a previous car I
owned. I replaces one of the rubber fuel lines and put too long a piece in.
It folded over and pinched off and the fuel pump failed within a day or so.

Tom H



In series, just put the electric at the back like you would if it was a
stand alone unit, and put the mechanical at the front like if it was a stand
alone unit (stock) ... use the same line between them, both pumps should be
able to bypass the other if it fails ... so run the mech. til it gets weak,
or use the elec. just for starting/priming purposes ... could run them
simultaneously too I suppose as it would cut down the work that the
mechanical had to do, but if you got the pulses out of sync you could
really hose some stuff I woudl think ... though 7psi isn't very much
pressure for either of them to deal with ...

Just my $.02
wish

96 Mustang GT 5spd 4.6L
73ish 1/2ton 4x4 6.4L

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Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 05:51:43 -0800
From: "Hogan, Tom"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump


I haven't really played with either type of pump other than in the
theoretical realm, but they operate on a neat siphon principal that allows
you to push the fluid through even if the pump isn't active.

Maybe someone who's torn these apart can explain it better ...


The mechanical fuel pump has a rubber diaphram inside it. The diphram is
connected to the fuel pump lever by a rod. As the lever is moved back and
forth by the eccentric on the cam it moves the diapghram up and down. This
movement of the diaphram creates suction on the low pressure side of the
pump. As the diaphram fills up with fuel it acts as a resivoir for the
carb. When it is full the rod connected to it stops moving it. The cam
lever has a slot in it and the rod has a flared end. This causes positive
movement of the rod by the lever during the suction event but allows the rod
to slip in the cam lever when the diaphram is full. This means that the
output pressure is regulated by the elasticity of the rubber diaphram --
approx 6-7 psi. This is why blockage on the input side is so damaging to
the pump.

Tom H.
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Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 05:51:44 -0800
From: "Hogan, Tom"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Brake problem

You will probably need the master cylinder. The boot is for dust control
not to hold in the fluid. If the fluid is getting to the boot then the
seals in the MC are shot and you don't have too long before the MC will
fail. This is from my own experience.

Tom H.

- -----Original Message-----
From: Spike188 aol.com [mailto:Spike188 aol.com]
Sent: Wednesday, December 01, 1999 1:05 AM
To: 61-79-list ford-trucks.com
Subject: FTE 61-79 - Brake problem


Speaking of losing brake fluid, I'm seeing some brake fluid on the front
floorboard, draining down to the area under the gas pedal. I assume this is

coming through the seal at the firewall. Can this boot be replaced separate

or do I need the whole master cylinder?
Thanks for the help.

Spike188 aol.com
1967 F100 swb
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------------------------------

Date: Fri, 03 Dec 1999 06:23:53 -0800
From: Don79XLT
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - Zero Oil Pressure

With my first 78f250 4x4 w/400 I learned the first thing to do with the
engine was to put in a MECHANICAL gauge, i will never run another engine
relying on the elctrical gauge...

At 09:18 PM 11/30/99 -0800, you wrote:
>Can anyone give me an idea why a seemingly healthy motor would suddenly
>lose oil pressure? When it first happened I took off the pressure sensor

Don
'79 Bronco Ranger XLT, 400,4.11's open diff,LT235x16",np205,and C6
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Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 07:17:19 -0800
From: "Hogan, Tom"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Happy Diesel Owner

I hope your diesel serves you well while you own it. How long do you =
plan
to own it? They do have advantages and disadvantages. The major
disadvantage is in cost of repair. For the cost of a fuel pump and
injectors I can maintain and keep my gas burner running for the life of =
the
truck. Unless you have specialized tools and are familiar with working =
on
diesels you really shouldn't wrench on them yourself. Don't think =
you'll
need a new pump? All it takes is one load of fuel with water in it and =
it
will mean a multi repair bill. Me, I'll dump in some fuel dry and =
buzz
on down the road. This is one example of a difference between the two. =
If
the diesel suits you better more power to you. Most of the =
disadvantages of
diesel simply require fore-knowledge and some thought to avoid them.

Tom H.

- -----Original Message-----
From: frenz.6 osu.edu [mailto:frenz.6 osu.edu]
Sent: Thursday, December 02, 1999 11:18 AM
To: 61-79-list ford-trucks.com
Subject: FTE 61-79 - Happy Diesel Owner


Man-O-Man...... that one guy is totally down on diesels. =
....and he
says his younger, diesel owning brother is the screwy one. I especially
liked the "Ford Optioned Engine" part. Um......in my estimation, if =
FORD
likes Powerstrokes well enough to put them in their trucks, then I =
guess
that makes them a FORD OPTIONED ENGINE. What? You think all those =
ashtrays
and seatbelts are made right there on the Ford Proving Grounds? No. =
Many
lessons in manufacturing and subcontracting to be learned here. I guess
I'll go out and warm up my "worthless land yacht" right now. I might =
even
go haul around some groceries. Maybe I'll just go hook to a 20,000lbs
Gooseneck=81 trailer and speed by you gas-powered boys pulling your =
aluminum
bass boats, wheezin' up the hills. (I might even stick my tongue out =
for
fun.)

- -Dale
2000 F-250SD SC Powerstroked Badass 4x4
"Ruby" 1979 F-150 SC 4x4 (Who is gas-powered and dearly loved)


=3D=3D FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info =
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Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 09:51:00 -0500
From: am14 daimlerchrysler.com
Subject: FTE 61-79 - Hesitation

Red W. writes: >>
OK, I got the fast idle cam set, readjusted the curb idle. Now when I
mash
the gas pedal quickly it dies out. If I steadily give the gas it revs up
fine. Just for reference, Holley 600 CFM, manual choke, vacuum secondaries.
Any help always appreciated.

Accelerator pump!!!

Azie
Ardmore, Al.

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Date: Fri, 03 Dec 1999 09:48:11 -0600
From: David.R.John deluxe.com
Subject: FTE 61-79 - 460 timing

This may seem stupid to all of you and I know you talk about timing
vehicles nearly everyday but I need you to dumb it down a little for me.
First off where should I start with my timing, 10 degrees advanced with the
vacuum advance plugged (Is this in the shop manuals and where, or is it
something they leave for the sticker on the valve cover that is long gone)?
Please bear in mind that all I have is a timing light that plugs into the
spark plug and a tach at my disposal. I can't make out the markings on the
balancer very good, but if I am looking at the engine from the front is
advance moving the pointer clockwise on the balancer or counter clockwise?
I have heard advance till it is pinging under load and then back it off,
also make sure that your starter can pull it at startup. Sounds pretty
trial and error and subjective, any way to do it better/faster with the
resources I have? What should my idle be with the auto? Set this after
hooking up the vac right?

Thanks for all your help again!!! BTW is it possible to have your
distributor off by a gear and still have the vehicle start up and run
reasonably well and having the distrib. sitting in it's normal looking
position (the vac thingy pointing basically straight out)?

Man my posts are always so long sorry!!!

David John
78 F250 4x4 Supercab 460 auto

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Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 07:44:07 -0800 (PST)
From: Bill Ballinger
Subject: FTE 61-79 - Warm Air

>Smokey pretty much proved that for part throttle
>operation, warmer is
>"ALWAYS" better for street engines :-)

Warm Air, Cold Fuel. It's like mixing up a tornado.
When you have water in a mass of cold air, hitting hot
air it rolls and spins and becomes a force much more
powerful than it's elements, a force more powerful
than any weather phemenon knwn, like... like... an
FE!!!!

I'm going to have to cut back on the pain meds!
__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Thousands of Stores. Millions of Products. All in one place.
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Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 10:09:31 -0600
From: "William S. Hart"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - 460 timing

> This may seem stupid to all of you and I know you talk about timing
> vehicles nearly everyday but I need you to dumb it down a little for me.
> First off where should I start with my timing, 10 degrees
> advanced with the
> vacuum advance plugged (Is this in the shop manuals and where, or is it
> something they leave for the sticker on the valve cover that is
> long gone)?


Well it depends on the year, but its not stupid ... maybe try this link :

http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.public.iastate.edu/~wish/Tech/Tuneup/tune.html

lemme know if that helps or hurts or what ...


> Please bear in mind that all I have is a timing light that plugs into the
> spark plug and a tach at my disposal. I can't make out the
> markings on the
> balancer very good, but if I am looking at the engine from the front is
> advance moving the pointer clockwise on the balancer or counter clockwise?

I'm not sure on that one ... usually you can tell 'cause BTDC has more marks
on it that ATC ...

> I have heard advance till it is pinging under load and then back it off,
> also make sure that your starter can pull it at startup. Sounds pretty
> trial and error and subjective, any way to do it better/faster with the
> resources I have?

There's all kinds of methods for it ... there's the "ear" method, adjust til
it smooths the idle, then take it on a drive and see how much ping you have,
then back the timing off til it stops pinging ...

The "cherry coke" test ... put a glass of cherry coke on the air cleaner,
when the vibes in it smooth out you're where you need to be, drive and see
how much ping, etc.

Then there's the trial and error approach of setting it at 10 or whatever
and adding a couple degrees til it pings then backing off again ...

Most of these methods will require a couple trial and error to really get it
"right"

On a stock motor with 89 octane I've seen 12 be about the highest you can go
without pinging ... but with 93 supposedly you can get to about 14deg ... of
course this is all dependent on the compression ratio and heads and cam and
all that stuff, but generally 10-14 is a good range to shoot for ..


> What should my idle be with the auto? Set this after
> hooking up the vac right?
>

Yup, after hooking up vac ... dunno though, what year motor and such?
usually I try and keep it below 1000, but even 900 seems high to me, some
people like a higher idle than others ...

> Thanks for all your help again!!! BTW is it possible to have your
> distributor off by a gear and still have the vehicle start up and run
> reasonably well and having the distrib. sitting in it's normal looking
> position (the vac thingy pointing basically straight out)?
>

Yup, it wouldn't run great, but its possible it'll run ... idle for sure ...

Just my $.02
wish

96 Mustang GT 5spd 4.6L
73ish 1/2ton 4x4 6.4L
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Date: Fri, 03 Dec 1999 08:27:42 -0800
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - mech fuel pump repair

I wrote:
>> When I put my FE together about 3 years ago I bought a new fuel pump
>> for it. It's one of the ones with the big fuel filter built right
>> in to the bottom of it. No rivets, just a bunch of screws hold it
>> together. It comes apart in about 2 minutes with a screwdriver.

Stu replied:
>Exactly as mine is.....I bought a new Carter (not rebuilt) when I assembled
>my engine
>this summer. I paid maybe 25 bucks for it at the local parts house. 12.00
>for rebuilt ones here....they are junk!!!
>I went through three of them in 1500 miles of driving.

Yes, mine is a Carter also. When I went pump shopping the first pump
the guy showed me was a cheap looking thing that didn't have the
integral fuel filter and it was all crimped and riveted together.
It gave me the creeps just to look at it...
I asked the guy, "Uhhh, what else have you got?" "I want the one
with the big fuel filter on it". He dug around the computer a bit
and found it for a different year. "It's more expensive", he says.
"Got one?" I ask him.
"Yeah." (disappears into the back, returns a minute later and hands
me a box that sez "Carter" on it..)
I open the box, and lo and behold, a pump with the filter on it AND
it's held together with screws instead of rivets and crap.
"How much?" I ask.
I don't remember the price, but I think it was about $27.
It was about $12 more than the junk he showed me the first time.
"Sold" sez I.

I've got about 57K miles on it now and it's never caused me any
grief. If it does, it gives me a warm fuzzy feeling to know I
can open it up for a quick look at it before I start walking...

>another new one [fuel pump and hemastats for the fuel line - no comments
>Deacon!! 8^) ]

Yup, hemostats can be mighty usefull in an emergency... I never leave
home without 'em. Deacon knows...


Steve
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Date: Fri, 03 Dec 1999 08:27:47 -0800
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Fuel system Springs was Electric Fuel Pump

Gary wrote:
>Chris, I agree with you when refering to a "regulator" but I was refering to
>a pump which is not necessarily refernecing the input pressure in any way
>and has no built in regulator mechanism or balance valve etc..

Thank you. You just said it... there is no reference to input pressure
and inlet pressure has no effect on the force on the spring side of the
diaghram. The spring force on the diaghram is what determines outlet
pressure and the inlet pressure does nothing to change that.

>
>Welding regulators and any sophisticated regulators do not just look at
>ambient, it also references the input pressure to balance the system.

NO! No no no no no...
Welding regulators do not generally reference the inlet pressure
in amy way. Outlet pressure is essentially independent of outlet
pressure. It's controlled only by spring pressure (and atmospheric)
on the back of the diaghram.
I spent a lot of my years repairing a wide variety of
welding equipment and I've had dozens of regulators apart.
If I can find some of my service manuals with exploded diagrams
of regulators I'll send you a copy to examine.

>This may all be hog wash if there are no pumps made like this, I'm just
>theorizing :-)

Uhhh, anyone need their swine cleansed? Gary's giving out free
hog wash today... (-:

Steve
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Date: Fri, 03 Dec 1999 08:27:45 -0800
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump

Gary wrote:
>Ok, my theory relies on the fact that the actual pressure is generated by
>the spring, not the mechanical leverage.

Yes, that's correct.

> If the lever pushes against a
>spring and the spring actually produces the pressure in the output line, not
>the lever, then the pump will output a pressure which is the inlet pressure
>plus the spring pressure, mitigated by the current output pressure which is
>pushing back and some ratio between the two controling the check valve.

No, once the inlet pressure is great enough to exceed the spring
presure the diaghram is pushed all the way up against spring pressure
and doesn't move. It creates no additional pressure.
Consider the well pump analogy. You have a pump that feeds a tank.
The tank contains a diaghram that seperates the water from a trapped
air space in the top of the tank. As water is pumped into the tank,
the diaghram moves upward against air pressure. If the pump puts
out a max of 50PSI, the diaghram moves upwards until the compressed
air space above it reaches 50PSI. At this point the system pressure
is balanced with the water pressure in the tank equal to the air
pressure above it. What is the water pressure at the outlet of the
tank? It's the pump pressure of the pump... 50PSI. It's not the
sum of the pump pressure plus the air pressure on the back of the
diaghram (100PSI) is it..?

If you put an electric pump in front of a diaghram pump, you have
a similar situation. Consider for a moment that the mechanical
pump is broken. The lever is broken and no longer moves the diaghram.
The only pressure you get is from the electric pump ahead of the
broken mechanical pump.
As the inlet pressure is increased, the mechanical diaghram moves up
against spring pressure. Once you exceed a certain pressure, the spring
is fully compressed and the diaghram can no longer move. What is the
pressure at the outlet of the mechanical pump? Is it the pressure
of the electric pump, or the pressure of the electric plus the pressure
exerted by the spring loaded diaghram in the mechanical pump?
Simple, it's the pressure from the electric pump only...
In this case the electric pump has supplied all the pressure and
the mechanical pump has simply become a hydraulic accumulator, storing
a volume of fuel in a trapped space against the pressure exerted by the
diaghram. This is the same as the water storage tank, except the
pressure on the back of the diaghram comes from spring pressure instead
of trapped air pressure... It contains a volume of pressurized fuel
that can be released later even if the first (electric) pump stops,
but it does nothing to increase the pressure itself.

The same thing applies even if the mechanical pump is working
just fine.. Once the inlet pressure is high enough the diaghram is
moved up against spring pressure until it can move no further.
The mechanical arm is doing nothing. It's just giving excercise
to the cam lobe that moves it. The pump has just become a storage
tank with fuel pressure stored against spring energy. The pump
arm is *not* moving the diaghram, *not* contributing any energy.
The outlet pressure is the same as the inlet pressure...

If the mechanical (2nd) pump is rated at 7PSI static head pressure,
and the electric (1st) pump has a variable output pressure, then
as the electric pump pressure is increased from 0psi, the mechanical
pump will boost it to the mechanicals 7PSI rating. Once the electric
pump pressure exceeds 7PSI, the mechanical pump diaghram will have moved
upward enough that it can no longer be actuated by it's lever and then
can contribute mothing. It has simply become a hydraulic accumultator
and the outlet pressure will be the same as the inlet pressure.

Wow, that was a lot of typing and I'm still not sure I've conveyed
my meaning... Did any of that make sense? Hope so...

> The check valve will allow the inlet pressure to bleed through
>the diaphram "IF" the output side is lower but it it is higher the check
>valve will be closed and the full pressure on the inlet side will affect the
>total force exerted by the diaphram against the output side.

Why does the inlet pressure affect the force exerted on the diaghram?
The force on the diaghram comes from spring pressure plus atmospheric
air pressure. The inlet pressure appears on the same side of the
diaghram as the outlet pressure. More inlet pressure looks the
same to the pump as more outlet pressure. Once it reaches a maximum
outlet pressure it ceases to pump...

> Again I'm only theorizing here since I have not actually
>taken either one apart but guessing at the actual operation based on
>experience with other similar devices.

Me thinks you need to take one apart and stare into it for a bit...

>It would be a very easy thing to test with both already hooked up and a
>switch to the electric. Simply run the mechanical with a gauge hooked up
>for a base line then, with no other changes, turn on the electric and see if
>there is a change. I will let you all know in a few months when I get one
>set up that way :-)

That sounds like a good idea. Let us know your findings...

Steve
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.sonic.net/~sdelanty

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Date: Fri, 03 Dec 1999 08:27:44 -0800
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - Engine Paint

>There is no paint at all on my block and heads, and
>unless I find a CJ iron intake I will need to paint my
>aluminum Performer black. Is there a primer needed to
>go under this stuff? Will it do aluminum(the timing
>cover too)?

I've never used the POR-15 (heard good things though...) so I
don't know what it wants for primer on aluminum. Maybe nothing?
I dunno...

When I painted my edelbrock, I first cleaned it good with very
hot soapy water, blew it dry with air, let it bake in the sun
for a few hours to make sure it was dry, then I primed it
with "single stage self etching primer" from "Mar-Hyde".
It's a spray can and i got it from a local auto parts store
that deals a lot of auto paint products. The guy there recommended
it for priming aluminum. After the primer I shot it with a few
coats of Krylon. /it's been a couple years now and it's holding
up pretty good axcept for a place that spilled fuel puddled up
in a low spot and ate the paint off the manifold...

> What kind of surface prep do I need?

On cast aluminum, the only prep work is "CLEAN".

>How
>does it do on the oil pan and valve covers?

Errr, dunno...

> I'd
>consider brush painting the pan, but I need
>bronze-gold for the valve covers so I plan to spray
>them. Do they make a brushable header paint too?

I've never seen *any* header paints (other than ceramic coatings)
that were worth anything.
I think on headers the term "Hi-Temp" stands for "Highly Temporary"...

Steve
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Date: Fri, 03 Dec 1999 08:27:40 -0800
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - Re: Water heated 4v carb spacer

Brett wrote:
>Folks,
>Thanks to all of you for responding on the heated carb spacer. It sounds
>like they were used on alot of FE's in the 60's. The reason I need one
>is that this is for a 300/6 Offie intake w/390 holley paired with a set
>of '87 EFI split exhaust manifolds. This combination does not allow you
>to use the standard heat riser for fuel vaporization, so I'm looking for
>another way to achieve this to improve mileage.

How do you like the 300 with the Offie/Holley? I've always liked
big sixes and some day I'd like to build up a nice one.
It warms my heart to see so many people on this list doing
performance mods to the 300...

> I find it hard to
>believe Ford would have gone through the expense of adding this plate if
>it was not effective in some way.
>Back to the junkyards....

Well, I didn't say it was ineffective, I just think there's better
choices. All the heated spacer plates I've seen are from 60's engines.
I've never seen one stock on a 70's Ford. Why is that? Is it just a
coincidence that exhaust heat stoves started to appear in the 70's?
The exhaust manifold heats up very quickly after starting, and using
it to heat the incoming air gets good atomization going much sooner
than a water heated spacer ever could.
A lot of Fords I've driven have a problem with "heat soak", when you
shut them off on a hot day, the heat from the manifold rises up into
the carb and percolates all the fuel from the bowl down into the
manifold. Makes 'em real hard to restart on a hot day. I had this
problem on my FE also. One of the traditional (and effective) cures
is to put a thick insulting spacer between the manifold and the carb
to slow down the heat transfer. This worked like a charm on mine,
and I've seen it work on others also.
Using a water heated aluminum spacer seems like it's definately the
wrong thing to do if you have heat soak problems in the summer.

I had problems with good mixture (and occasional carb icing) on
mine. The "heat stove" that came with my headers was patheticaly
ineffective so I opted to not use it. After having winter problems
I finally broke down and built a sheet metal stove that wrapped
around a good chunk of two header tubes and put a different air
snorkel on that had the vacuum operated flap to suck the warm air
from the stove. Egads, what a difference! All my cold temp carb
problems disappeared and I was able to turn the idle mix screw
much leaner and still have a smooth, drivable motor from seconds
after startup.

I'm not trying to say that a heated spacer is useless, only that
if I was having problems and *didn't* have a functional heat stove
that my first priority would be to get a working stove.
I think the stove does the job more effeciently and without the
possibility of aggravating heat soak problems during the summer.
If I still had problems after I had a good heat stove *then* I might
consider a heated spacer also...
But then I'm a California boy and what the hell do *I* know about
cold weather? (-:

Steve
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Date: Fri, 03 Dec 1999 08:27:43 -0800
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - Clutch Spring Failure

>Pat Brown
>Sebastopol, California wrote:
>
>Anyone ever seen all the springs fall out of a disc & lock up the
>clutch?

Yup, but never on a Ford yet...

Steve
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Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 11:44:07 -0500
From: "Peters, Gary (G.R.)"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - 460 timing

Use some sand paper and clean the rust and grease off the damper then find
the mark that represents 10 degrees Before TDC and mark it with some white
chalk so the line stands out very clearly.

Now take the cap off the dizzy and note the location of the plug wire which
goes to the first cylinder on your left, that's number one cylinder. Then
rotate the engine until the rotor in the dizzy lines up roughly with that
location and fine position the crank so the mark lines up with the pointer
on the block (or timing cover in this case). This should put the crank at
10 DBTDC and the dizzy lined up with number one plug wire on the compression
stroke (assuming the engine ran before this). You should make your last
crank adjustment in a counter clockwise direction to take up any slack in
the timing chain.

Now loosen the dizzy clamp bolt and rotate the dizzy until the center
rectangle in the pickup coil lines up exactly with the nearest lobe on the
rotor (8 armed star thingy) so they exactly cover each other.

This is called "Static timing" and is sufficient for all duraspark
applications and will put it exactly on 10 degrees when idling with vac
plugged but you can double check it with your light if you like :-) I never
bother with the light because this method is accurate and very simple to do
once you figure it out :-)

While you have the cap off though, grab the plastic rotor and try to rotate
it in either direction. It should move under spring pressure in one
direction only and come back to a positive stop and should do this reliably
time after time, smoothly and with no binding or hanging up when you release
it.

Check the vac the same way by rotating the pickup plate. It should all work
smoothly. If not you need to get some grease in there and loosen up the
parts but don't use an excessive amount and it should be a thin Lubriplate
type grease or white grease.

This is called your base line timing for any further adjustments. Now you
can road test it and see if it responds well. At this point you can
continue to increase the advance 2 degrees at a time untill you notice spark
knock at low rpm, high load and back it out untill you are comfortable with
the performance. I prefer to leave a tiny bit of spark knock under those
conditions because I generally don't get into that condition too often and
this gives me the maximum advance and therefore allows for the leanest
possible tune.

Keep in mind that even if you have the value on the sticker available it may
not be optimum for your application so you may still want to play with this
a little. Also remember that dampers are not 100% reliable as to where the
marks are relative to the crank's actual position and older ones deteriorate
and can move as well.

As I've stressed in the past you need a good vac to have decent city manners
in any engine so make sure this is working properly before you quit :-)

- --
Michigan, Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.thewowfactor.com/bigbroncos/detail.cfm?detailid=167
- --

> First off where should I start with my timing, 10 degrees
> advanced with the
> vacuum advance plugged (Is this in the shop manuals and
> where, or is it
> something they leave for the sticker on the valve cover that
> is long gone)?
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Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 10:49:33 -0600
From: "William S. Hart"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Fuel system Springs was Electric Fuel Pump

> Welding regulators do not generally reference the inlet pressure
> in amy way. Outlet pressure is essentially independent of outlet
> pressure. It's controlled only by spring pressure (and atmospheric)
> on the back of the diaghram.

Uhm ... I think you meant Outlet is independent of inlet (it can't really be
independent of itself can it ? not without getting to the whole brain vs.
mind thing ... :)

I see what you're saying though I still think there's a small chance that it
will go slightly over the anticipated pressure as your volumetric efficiency
may increase by having less force required to draw in a charge ... also
sounds like a good way to break a mech. pump if its very old ... and I don't
think it will ever be additive, more like a 1 or 2 psi increase over what
was expected, may or may not cause problems depending on the carb ...

> >This may all be hog wash if there are no pumps made like this, I'm just
> >theorizing :-)
>
> Uhhh, anyone need their swine cleansed? Gary's giving out free
> hog wash today... (-:
>

And its even raining today ... so the hogs are getting washed if they're
outside ...


Just my $.02
wish

96 Mustang GT 5spd 4.6L
73ish 1/2ton 4x4 6.4L
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Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 03:36:18 -0500
From: chris koran
Subject: FTE 61-79 - engine dieing

hey all,
i've got a problem that i hope someone out there has seen before and can
help me with. my truck has been having a problem with a dieing
problem. i am running a 300 with a 4 speed tranny. it usually happens
at higher rpm (2500 and on up) and will cause the engine to completely
shut off. when it does, it will start right back up as if nothing has
happened. i've had my ignition bench checked, i replaced my coil (had
the new one bench checked too), and the timing seems to be pretty
close. i haven't been able to get the timing perfect though, 'cause my
manual doesn't list it anywhere. it says to refer to the sticker under
my hood which hasn't been there for years. the entire wire harness
under the hood was first shook down, then, out of exasperation, totally
rewired. it idles smoothly, runs smoothly down the road, but just dies
off about every 4 to 5 minutes. i don't know if this is something
simple or an unheard of problem. i really need help on this one.
anything anyone can think would be great. thanks

chris koran
'79 F250 4X4

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Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 11:48:57 -0500
From: "Peters, Gary (G.R.)"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump

Made sense but not with the way I am visualizing the pump. Guess I'll have
to tear one down and see what makes it tick, tick, tick, tock......:-) Just
happens that I have a few lying around...:-) (who would've guessed :-))

- --
Michigan, Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.thewowfactor.com/bigbroncos/detail.cfm?detailid=167
- --

> Wow, that was a lot of typing and I'm still not sure I've conveyed
> my meaning... Did any of that make sense? Hope so...
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Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 11:23:38 -0600
From: "William S. Hart"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - engine dieing

> it idles smoothly, runs smoothly down the road, but just dies
> off about every 4 to 5 minutes. i don't know if this is something
> simple or an unheard of problem. i really need help on this one.
> anything anyone can think would be great. thanks
>

Have you checked your fuel pump and carb ? Sounds like the bowl might be
running dry or not quite refilling right ... but that's ust a guess of
course.


Just my $.02
wish

96 Mustang GT 5spd 4.6L
73ish 1/2ton 4x4 6.4L
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.public.iastate.edu/~wish

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Date: Fri, 03 Dec 1999 11:23:24 -0600
From: Larry Schmiedekamp
Subject: FTE 61-79 - Belly up

Chris wrote

it idles smoothly, runs smoothly down the road, but just dies
off about every 4 to 5 minutes. i don't know

.... you might check your gas tank. Something may be getting sucked onto
the pickup and stopping the fuel and when it dies the vacumn quits and lets it
float off letting you restart and then repeats itself again.

Or maybe check the fuel filter.

Oh yes. a quick check is when it dies get out and hand pump the carb and
see if
you have a stream of gas shooting out. If so maybe not a fuel problem.

Have fun..

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Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 11:28:24 -0600
From: "William S. Hart"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump

> I'll have
> to tear one down and see what makes it tick, tick, tick,
> tock......:-)


I'm always scared of things in fuel systems that tick ... just seems wrong
...


remember when you're on the bomb squad you only get one "oops"

Just my $.02
wish

96 Mustang GT 5spd 4.6L
73ish 1/2ton 4x4 6.4L
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.public.iastate.edu/~wish

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Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 09:56:06 -0800
From: "Walt T."
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - engine dieing

This may sound alittle far out but about a year ago my 72 ford truck would
die on me at different times usally on the freeway. This went on for about a
year, rebuild the carb, replaced the fuel filter, coil anything I could
think of. I finally pulled the fuel tank got a flashlight and looked in it
and there it was, The little gasket off a Gas additive bottle just floating
around down where the fuel exits toward the engine. Got that out and that
was the end of my problem, very much a big headache for a year.
Something to concider.
Walt
- ----- Original Message -----
From: chris koran
To:
Sent: November 30, 1999 0:36
Subject: FTE 61-79 - engine dieing


> hey all,
> i've got a problem that i hope someone out there has seen before and can
> help me with. my truck has been having a problem with a dieing
> problem. i am running a 300 with a 4 speed tranny. it usually happens
> at higher rpm (2500 and on up) and will cause the engine to completely
> shut off. when it does, it will start right back up as if nothing has
> happened. i've had my ignition bench checked, i replaced my coil (had
> the new one bench checked too), and the timing seems to be pretty
> close. i haven't been able to get the timing perfect though, 'cause my
> manual doesn't list it anywhere. it says to refer to the sticker under
> my hood which hasn't been there for years. the entire wire harness
> under the hood was first shook down, then, out of exasperation, totally
> rewired. it idles smoothly, runs smoothly down the road, but just dies
> off about every 4 to 5 minutes. i don't know if this is something
> simple or an unheard of problem. i really need help on this one.
> anything anyone can think would be great. thanks
>
> chris koran
> '79 F250 4X4
>
> == FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html
>

== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 3 Dec 1999 13:19:32 -0500
From: "Peters, Gary (G.R.)"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - engine dieing

Pickup tube sock. If you don't know how to get to it let us know :-) I
take this off and replace it with a length of brake line using a standard
brake line coupling and double flare although a single flare is sufficient
here :-) This means you will have to make sure you have a good filter in
your line to protect the carb and fuel pump of course :-)

- --
Michigan, Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.thewowfactor.com/bigbroncos/detail.cfm?detailid=167
- --

> at higher rpm (2500 and on up) and will cause the engine to completely
> shut off. when it does, it will start right back up as if nothing has
> happened.

> off about every 4 to 5 minutes. i don't know if this is something
== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 03 Dec 1999 10:46:23 -0800
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Fuel system Springs was Electric Fuel Pump

I wrote:
>
>> Welding regulators do not generally reference the inlet pressure
>> in amy way. Outlet pressure is essentially independent of outlet
>> pressure. It's controlled only by spring pressure (and atmospheric)....


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