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Subject: 61-79-list-digest V3 #443
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61-79-list-digest Wednesday, December 1 1999 Volume 03 : Number 443



=======================================================================
Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1961-1979 Trucks and Vans
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In this issue:

RE: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump
RE: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump
RE: FTE 61-79 - FE Electric Fuel Pump?
FTE 61-79 - painting the frame
RE: FTE 61-79 - Radiator in a 400
RE: FTE 61-79 - Geniuses....??
RE: FTE 61-79 - Water heated 4v carb spacer
FTE 61-79 - brake problem
RE: FTE 61-79 - Water heated 4v carb spacer
RE: FTE 61-79 - Zero Oil Pressure
RE: FTE 61-79 - painting the frame
FTE 61-79 - gAS IN oIL PAN
FTE 61-79 - Mechanical fuel pumps
FTE 61-79 - mech fuel pump repair
FTE 61-79 - 4bbl intake
RE: FTE 61-79 - Mechanical fuel pumps
FTE 61-79 - Loose steering
FTE 61-79 - Re:LiL Mo' Info
Re: FTE 61-79 - Mo info--FE 352 HELP!
Re: FTE 61-79 - A LIL MO' INFO.........
Re: FTE 61-79 - A LIL MO' INFO.........
Re: FTE 61-79 - A LIL MO' INFO.........
RE: FTE 61-79 - Re:LiL Mo' Info
RE: FTE 61-79 - Loose steering
FTE 61-79 - Missed emails
Re: FTE 61-79 - 66 flasher location
Re: FTE 61-79 - Water heated 4v carb spacer
RE: FTE 61-79 - Loose steering
Re: FTE 61-79 - First firing.....the whole story
Re: FTE 61-79 - RE: Compressors
RE: FTE 61-79 - Water heated 4v carb spacer
RE: FTE 61-79 - Water heated 4v carb spacer
RE: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump
Re: FTE 61-79 - mech fuel pump repair
Re: FTE 61-79 - Loose steering
Re: FTE 61-79 - Missed emails
FTE 61-79 - Re: T18 kits
FTE 61-79 - Re: Cummins Turbo in a Ford
FTE 61-79 - Re: Water heated 4v carb spacer
Re: FTE 61-79 - mech fuel pump repair
FTE 61-79 - Mysterious parts FTE 61-79 -
RE: FTE 61-79 - cab on, no brakes
Re: FTE 61-79 - painting the frame

=======================================================================

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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 06:36:21 -0500
From: "Peters, Gary (G.R.)"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump

The electrics I am familiar with do not have a regulator in them, they have
a solenoid winding which can only generate 7# at it's best so simply can't
produce more than 7# but with a mechanical pulling at the output side it may
well boost the pressure at the carb enough to overpower the needles. This
is just one hypothetical possibility, not proven by experience :-)

Only Steve can answer this.....but I believe the mechancal pumps have a
spring between the arm and the diaphram which limits the pressure they can
generate as well, not a regulator as such so, again, if you have less
resistance on the one side of the pump it is possible to generate more than
the spring would indicate.

If the last mechanism in the line indeed does have a regulator then the
static pressure in the output line would determine the pump output pressure
and you would be absolutely right :-) If all of them are controlled by
spring pressure then they could accumulate since the spring only maintains a
measured difference between the input and output of each device.....:-)
Remember none of these pumps was designed to actually be used in series so
regulation by the spring or windings is typically adequate and the added
expense of a regulator is not required so was not designed into them.

- --
Michigan, Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.thewowfactor.com/bigbroncos/detail.cfm?detailid=167
- --

> >>Neither pump is supposed to put out more than 7# but
> together they may
> exceed that.
>
> Well, ding dang it, I can't resist. So if one pump puts out
> 7# and two put
> out 14# does 10 make 70#? If output is set by a pressure
> relief valve, it
> doesn't matter if there are 7000 pumps running, you won't exceed 7# or
> whatever the highest relief valve is set to. :-) An alternative to a
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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 08:03:49 -0500
From: "Peters, Gary (G.R.)"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump

These pumps are all very simple devices. They use a check valve and
diaphram to progressively build a vacuum on the inlet side and positive
pressure on the outlet side of the pump. Each stroke pulls air or fluid
from the inlet, past the check valve and then on the opposite stroke forces
this past another check valve in the diaphram itself to the pressure side.
When it does the next stroke it pushes agianst this and also sucks against
the inlet check valve. Since both check valves work in the same direction
you have a clear path to the line in a pressure direction only, that is from
the tank to the carb. There is some resistance in the check valves so some
sucking power is lost to any pump on the pressure side of it due to this but
I doubt if it's very significant. Except for WOT with large engines you
don't need more that a few pounds of fuel pressure most of the time anyway
:-) (I have deliberately simplified this so dont' jump my case :-))

If the mechanical pump diaphram breaks or spings a leak you will get fuel
past it to the crank case and will notice a strong fuel smell when you pull
the dipstick or change the oil. If it becomes serious you will also notice
a drop in fuel economy. Hopefully, by then, you have noticed something and
taken steps.....:-( If you are running both pumps and suspect the
mechanical one has failed you can use the switch setup I described and shut
the electric off and test it.

- --
Michigan, Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.thewowfactor.com/bigbroncos/detail.cfm?detailid=167
- --

> I think this is the part I don't understand....the pumps have
> an internal
> bypass??
> I thought one of the problems with the mechanical was that
> when it broke it
> sometimes pushes gas into the block...wouldn't the electric
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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 08:15:54 -0500
From: "Peters, Gary (G.R.)"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - FE Electric Fuel Pump?

The way I set mine up is with two wires. The pump has one input but the
pressure switch has two inputs and one output. One input is from the start
relay to operate the pump in start mode only, the other is from the battery
and only gets power to the output when there is pressure.

What I did is use the tank selector switch to provide power anytime, no time
or only when pressurized so that I could turn it on and let it run till the
carb was full for starting or priming etc. then turn it to the "Run" mode
which allows the pressure switch to operate normally or I can also turn
power to the pump completely off if I want to.

Be carefull how you set this up though so you don't back feed 12v to the
start relay. That terminal is shunted in the energized position to the
solenoid windings so power to either terminal can maintain the relay in it's
energized state but only one will actually energize it. You don't want
power to be maintained on that line after releasing the key or it will keep
the starter running. A shorted module will do this too.....don't ask :-(

- --
Michigan, Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.thewowfactor.com/bigbroncos/detail.cfm?detailid=167
- --

> I forgot to add that the oil pressure switches have the
> accomodation for a
> wire from the starter solenoid ( trigger voltage ) . That
> when the circuit is
> completed ( no oil pressure ) . You have fuel pressure while
> cranking .
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Date: Wed, 01 Dec 1999 08:02:52 -0500
From: "J. Doss Halsey"
Subject: FTE 61-79 - painting the frame

Jeff wrote:
>My engine's coming out of my 79 Bronco tomorrow and I have the standard
>array of oven cleaner and high-heat paint for degreasing and beautification
>of the engine & parts - but I have been wondering about painting the frame
>as well, as I will be moving to the coast next year...
>
>What paint did you use?
>
Here's how I did it. Degreasing was accomplished using a Castrol product
called "super clean" or "power clean" or something like that. I call it
"purple power." It comes in spray bottles and gallons. You spray this stuff
on, wait a little while, and use a pressure washer to hose it off. Repeat
as necessary. It works like a charm. Degreased an entire old truck in a
couple of hours. The POR 15 guys sell a similar cleaner called "marine
clean." It is much more expensive and works the same as far as I can tell.

As far as the paint goes, I used POR 15 semigloss black from Restomotive
Labs for the frame and inner fenders. I love the stuff. There is a metal
prep step first which is another spray bottle full of blue liquid called
"metal prep". I believe it is phosphoric acid, but I am not sure. Let that
soak in and rinse off. Let dry. The paint (POR 15) is a one-part
moisture-curing urethane which you paint right over rust. Hence the name
POR, for Paint Over Rust. It goes on very smoothly and all brush marks flow
right out. It looks great and is easy to apply. Wear rubber gloves, because
once it cures, only time will remove it from your skin. I still have spots
of it on my glasses.

Several other companies make similar stuff. You can get another brand of it
from Eastwood, for example. POR 15 makes it easy, though. Their catalog
tells you each step and everything you will need.

For the engine, I used a high temperature engine paint from the same
company (Restomotive Labs). This stuff is high gloss, brushable, rich in
color, and flows so well that you can't tell it from a spray job. It is
beautiful.

I also used their ultra-high temp paint on the manifolds. Factory cast iron
gray. It is a little bit silvery for my taste, but still it looks great.
After 500 miles, I can't even tell that the heat has had any effect on it
at all (on the manifolds that is, around the exhaust ports on the heads the
engine paint has already burned off).

See what I mean when I say I'm the new poster child for POR 15? I am giving
POR-15 starter kits to my friends for Christmas (seriously).

Doss Halsey
'68 F250, shiny 390, good lookin frame
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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 08:37:38 -0500
From: "Peters, Gary (G.R.)"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Radiator in a 400

The 351 usually has the super cool as an option but the 400 typically comes
with it stock. The difference between the stock 3 tube and super cool 4
tube could easily be 2 qts :-)

- --
Michigan, Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.thewowfactor.com/bigbroncos/detail.cfm?detailid=167
- --

> Just read that radiator capacity for the 351M is 20 quarts
> while the 400
> takes 22 quarts.
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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 08:49:20 -0500
From: "Peters, Gary (G.R.)"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Geniuses....??

I'm goin to have to get Steve to design a belt for my head if this keeps up.
Just because I've read a lot and have a built it ability to put mechanical
two and two's together doesn't make me a genius.....PHD material maybe but
certainly not a genius :-) Many of us grizzled old f**ts have just stumbled
on to some many things in our lives that it appears that we know it all but
those of us who are honest admit that we are still learning and even learn
from the younger ones sometimes I'm happy to say. I sure taught my dad a
thing or two......He would have taught me a thing or two as well.....if I
had only listened :-)

BTW, everyone knows if you want to make an impression you just keep talking
and sooner or later you will say something smart.....:-) I've been told I
really must have taken that to heart :-)

- --
Michigan, Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.thewowfactor.com/bigbroncos/detail.cfm?detailid=167
- --

> Whoops! I know it's supposed to be genius---call me Einstien!

> deal(Gary, you're
> a
> > genious). >
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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 09:00:25 -0500
From: "Peters, Gary (G.R.)"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Water heated 4v carb spacer

Well.....as usual I was getting into the thory of it :-) I tend to agree
with you Steve but I do know that hotter inlet air runs much more
efficiently at low rpms and low loads such as idle and cruise which is where
most of your economy comes from so this unit may help in that area, not
really sure. My guess is that the coolant temp will remain stable enough
that the carb should never boil unless you have a hot soak problem which
elevates the coolant temps to boiling when you shut it off. This is one
place an electric water pump and cooling fan set up actually makes sense :-)

Of course the boiling point of gasoline is much lower than water so.....???

- --
Michigan, Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.thewowfactor.com/bigbroncos/detail.cfm?detailid=167
- --

> floor of the intake manifold. I'm unconvinced of the value
> of a heated
> spacer under the carb. I usually spend some effort to try
> and keep that
> area cool...
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Date: Wed, 01 Dec 1999 08:23:41 -0600
From: "John LaGrone"
Subject: FTE 61-79 - brake problem

>>Speaking of losing brake fluid, I'm seeing some brake fluid on the front
floorboard, draining down to the area under the gas pedal. I assume this is
coming through the seal at the firewall. Can this boot be replaced separate
or do I need the whole master cylinder?
Thanks for the help.

Spike, you need the whole master cylinder. It is probably working below
capacity now and will shortly quit altogether. Don't wait very long.

- -- John
jlagrone ford-trucks.com
1979 F150 Custom LWB Regular Cab 351M C6 (Henry)
http://www.ford-trucks.com/jlagrone/henry.home.htm
Dearborn iron rules!!!!
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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 08:26:13 -0600
From: "William S. Hart"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Water heated 4v carb spacer

Gary wrote:

>I tend to agree
> with you Steve but I do know that hotter inlet air runs much more
> efficiently at low rpms and low loads such as idle and cruise

Steve wrote :

> > I'm unconvinced of the value
> > of a heated
> > spacer under the carb. I usually spend some effort to try
> > and keep that
> > area cool...


Okay Steve, lets move you North a few hundred miles, and inland another
couple hundred ... suddenly you're going from July temps peaking 100+ to
winter temps bottoming out -30 or so ... to have any hope of maintaining a
comparable mixture between winter and summer you've got to do something to
stabilize the carb temp when its warmed up ... at -30 that engine
compartment is big enough to chill even the exhaust manifold somewhat it
seems... and over 100 it is small enough to keep enough heat to cook an egg
on the hood (just guessing, don't really want that on my paint!) ...
granted these are extremes, but eariler this year we were getting an easy
30deg swing in temps just between day and night ... scarey, but almost
impossible to tune for ...

Anyway that's my argument for a water heated carb plate ... granted there is
still some movement through the seasons, at least the truck is driveable
this way ...

Just my $.02
wish

96 Mustang GT 5spd 4.6L
73ish 1/2ton 4x4 6.4L
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.public.iastate.edu/~wish

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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 09:35:09 -0500
From: "Peters, Gary (G.R.)"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Zero Oil Pressure

Go out and start it and see if you have pressure when cold. If so then you
have a typical "worn bearing" syndrome. The fact that it was sudden may
indicate a damaged bearing or crack in one of the heads or blown head gasket
which holds pressure untill the oil thins out.

A blown gallery plug would allow enough pressure loss that you probably
would not have pressure cold either but a rust hole in a press in gallery
plug could cause these symptoms too.

- --
Michigan, Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.thewowfactor.com/bigbroncos/detail.cfm?detailid=167
- --

> Can anyone give me an idea why a seemingly healthy motor
> would suddenly
> lose oil pressure?
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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 10:32:17 -0500
From: "Peters, Gary (G.R.)"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - painting the frame

Many on the bronco list used por-15 and had nothing but praise for it :-)
Wonder if it will fill in large, fist sized holes in fenders..........

- --
Michigan, Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.thewowfactor.com/bigbroncos/detail.cfm?detailid=167
- --

> As far as the paint goes, I used POR 15 semigloss black from
> Restomotive
> Labs for the frame and inner fenders. I love the stuff. There
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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 12:26:03 -0500
From: am14 daimlerchrysler.com
Subject: FTE 61-79 - gAS IN oIL PAN

Ted writes: >>I thought one of the problems with the mechanical was that
when it broke it
sometimes pushes gas into the block...wouldn't the electric compound the
problem??


You're right Ted. I like Elect pumps for some things, but they have a
distinct disadvantage, IF, you put them in series with the mechinical pump,
and you just named it. Oil pan fill of raw gas, and we all know how well
gas lubricates - right???

Azie
Ardmore, Al.

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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 12:32:24 -0500
From: am14 daimlerchrysler.com
Subject: FTE 61-79 - Mechanical fuel pumps

William B. writes: >>Nope ... what happens there is the siphon valve quits
and allows the fluid
to back flow towards the tank ... the way these pumps work they will allow
fluid to pass through them even though they aren't pumping as much as is
being pulled through ... for instance when a fuel pump goes out
(mechanical)
do you notice right away? Dad drove clear home one time when one went out
... it can siphon the gas from the tank to the carb even though the
mechanical is dead ... this is also true if the mechanical is alive ...

I haven't really played with either type of pump other than in the
theoretical realm, but they operate on a neat siphon principal that allows
you to push the fluid through even if the pump isn't active.

Not always. Sometimes when mechanical fuel pumps go bad they rupture on
the inside and fuel will get into the oil pan. This is when it is a very
undesireable thing to have an electric pump back behind it pushing raw gas
into the oil pan. If the mechanical pump doesn't rupture on the inside
diaphram, then it is not a problem, but I've had several do this and "IT
AIN'T GOOD".

Azie
Ardmore, Al.


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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 12:41:32 -0500
From: am14 daimlerchrysler.com
Subject: FTE 61-79 - mech fuel pump repair

Steve DeL. writes: >>I also like the fact that if a mechanical pump dies
out in the middle
of nowhere it's possible to disassemble and possibly repair it on the
spot.

Don't all the Mechanicals built in the last 15 years or so have rivits
instead of bolts holding it together??? The ones I have are rivited - All
of them. removing them out in the boondocks would be a task.

I, too, prefer the mechanical pumps, but I'm not so sure I'd want to
disassemble one out in the boondocks and repair it, B U T, if it was that,
or walk a hundred or so miles, you can bet I'd be driving out those rivits.

Azie
Ardmore, Al.

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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 12:51:10 -0500
From: am14 daimlerchrysler.com
Subject: FTE 61-79 - 4bbl intake

Bill Deacon writes: >>I have a '66 F-250 with 82,000 actual miles(spent a
lot of time in a
driveway with a camper sitting on it). The engine--352, 2 barrel, runs
great
and burns no oil. I've installed a Pertronix ignition, which I am very
happy
with by the way, and plan on installing headers this week-end. While at my
parents house at Lake Havasu this past week-end I picked up a stock 4
barrel
intake at a garage sale for $15. So now I plan on installing that also. I
am
thinking about putting a new Edelbrock 600 cfm carb on it. Is this a good
choice? Also, since I will have the intake off, is it a good idea to
replace
the timing chain, cam and lifters.

If I had a '66 with just 82K miles on it I would not change a thing except
the valve seals while you are in there. The timing chain/gear probably
needs it, but you obviously don't drive it very much, and I've gotten in
the neighborhood of 130K on most of my FE's that were only street
driven(not raced except on occasion). Most are going to tell you to change
it, but it all depends on your personal wants. I can't remember if the '66
had a fiber gear or not, but that is about the time FOMOCO went to Fiber,
so it probably is, and that might change my opinion.

Not a great deal of help, was I.

Oh well.

Azie
Ardmore, Al.

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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 11:52:28 -0600
From: "William S. Hart"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Mechanical fuel pumps

> Not always. Sometimes when mechanical fuel pumps go bad they rupture on
> the inside and fuel will get into the oil pan.

I've heard of this, but never seen it yet ... oil comin out from the fuel
pump was a pretty cool one though (82 GT did that) ... I understand the
problems with it for sure though, but this will also affect your oil
pressure quite a bit and could cause your electric to start cutting out as
the fuel pressure bounced ... at any rate it would likely get you signs
using the oil pressure switch ...

I'm almost thinkin the oil pressure and inertia switches in combo would be
the safest bet all around ...

Just my $.02
wish

96 Mustang GT 5spd 4.6L
73ish 1/2ton 4x4 6.4L
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.public.iastate.edu/~wish

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Date: Wed, 01 Dec 1999 13:26:44 -0600
From: David.R.John deluxe.com
Subject: FTE 61-79 - Loose steering

Fellow Ford Folks,

Is there anything that I can do to tighten the steering on my 78 4x4 F250?
The ball joints and other connections all seem tight, the looseness seems
to be in the box and has just come up recently. Does this mean the box is
bad or can you adjust it up some? I know there is an adjustment nut on the
box, but not sure what to do with it and did not want to make it worse
without consulting the List. I have the factory manuals but they don't
give me much help in this, unless I am rebuilding the box.

Thanks,
David John

78 F250 4x4 Supercab Camper Special 460 C6

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Date: Wed, 01 Dec 1999 14:06:48 CST
From: "martin steiner"
Subject: FTE 61-79 - Re:LiL Mo' Info

Hey I want to get in on this too:) I have been a subscriber for a few
months, but because my schedule is to busy I don't write much.
I am am 19 and a freshman at Ellsworth Com. College in Iowa Falls Ia.(I am
coming to ISU my JR year, Wish). I work part time at O'Reilly Auto Parts. My
daily driver is a Taurus MT-5, 2.5lt with a 5 speed(wimpy) I also own '72
150, 300I6 this one is tore done in my shop right now, I plan to have it
done this winter. I also have: two '66s one ton, one 3/4, Two 59s, One ton,
One 3/4. and my baby is a '631/2 Fairlane 500 Sport Coupe. As you can see I
love my Fords, that is how I got my nickname, I am always saying "the
stampede is louder than the heartbeat" That is why they call me Stampede:)

Martin "Stampede" Steiner

______________________________________________________
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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 15:34:33 EST
From: Bad4dFilly aol.com
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - Mo info--FE 352 HELP!

In a message dated 11/30/1999 11:22:50 PM !!!First Boot!!!,
billyboy surfside.net writes:


Disneyland). >>

COOL! Yet another So Cal person! I'm in Diamond Bar, not too far away.

*~*~Lisa and Emvy~*~*
*~*~Silly boys...trucks are for GIRLS~*~*
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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 15:36:32 EST
From: Bad4dFilly aol.com
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - A LIL MO' INFO.........

In a message dated 12/01/1999 8:44:30 AM !!!First Boot!!!, patb sonic.net
writes:


Lisa, he drives an '87 baby Bronco :-) >>

RIGHT ON!!!!! =) Just gimme the libk! =P

*~*~Lisa and Envy~*~*
*~*~SIlly boys...trucks are for GIRLS!~*~*
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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 15:36:58 EST
From: Bad4dFilly aol.com
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - A LIL MO' INFO.........

OK I'm a dork, I can't even speel "link" right! LOL
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Date: Wed, 01 Dec 1999 14:57:28 -0600
From: David.R.John deluxe.com
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - A LIL MO' INFO.........

Now you can spell "link", but what about "spell"?? :=D Gotcha

Lisa wrote:
OK I'm a dork, I can't even speel "link" right! LOL

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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 15:16:28 -0600
From: "William S. Hart"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Re:LiL Mo' Info

> I am am 19 and a freshman at Ellsworth Com. College in Iowa Falls
> Ia.(I am
> coming to ISU my JR year, Wish).

Cool, we need more FTE's down here :) feel free to hunt me down when you
get here, I'm not too hard to find and am usually willing to lend a hand
fixin something :)


If you're comin down for a campus visit be sure and give me a holler too...

Just my $.02
wish

96 Mustang GT 5spd 4.6L
73ish 1/2ton 4x4 6.4L
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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 15:12:53 -0500
From: "Peters, Gary (G.R.)"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Loose steering

You need to check several places and isolate the movement to be sure. If
the box suddenly becomes loose there are two possibilities I can think of:
the adjuster nut loosened up and allowed the "T" bolt to back out or
something, a bearing most likely, is broken. One other possiblility is the
input shaft bearing preload which will allow the rack to move fore and aft.

Hold the input shaft to the box and try to move the steering shaft to see if
there is movement in the rag joint or one of it's components and also
inspect the Ujoint at the base of the column for this as well. If the
steering thumps as you turn the wheel, oil the ujoint and work it to free it
up then check for looseness again.

If you determine the box adjuster is the culprit then you need to find the
exact center of movement in the box and take the lash out at that point but
do not get it too tight.

- --
Michigan, Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.thewowfactor.com/bigbroncos/detail.cfm?detailid=167
- --

> Is there anything that I can do to tighten the steering on my
> 78 4x4 F250?
> The ball joints and other connections all seem tight, the
> looseness seems
> to be in the box and has just come up recently. Does this
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Date: Wed, 01 Dec 1999 14:21:38 PST
From: "White Wolf"
Subject: FTE 61-79 - Missed emails

Since I was removeed due to hotmail problems I missed a few days (or more)
worth of email, I was wondering if anyone had responded to my questions
regarding my '66 F100 352. I believe one was about the carb/intake manifold
and the other was about the turn signal intermitteness...
And on that note does anyone knbow where I can find the turn signal
flasher for my '66 F100? I have tried 3 diff auto stores and Dennis
Carpenter and cannot find it... Although I might be looking for the wrong
thing. The auto stores give me a little round flasher with 2 prongs(which
is what I am used to) but I cannot find anything like that on my truck!
What I am seeing as my flasher is on the engine side of the firewall with a
fuse on it.... Help?

______________________________________________________
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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 17:34:24 EST
From: TBeeee aol.com
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - 66 flasher location

In a message dated 12/1/99 5:24:46 PM Eastern Standard Time,
whitewolf_ hotmail.com writes:

> And on that note does anyone knbow where I can find the turn signal
> flasher for my '66 F100? I have tried 3 diff auto stores and Dennis
> Carpenter and cannot find it... Although I might be looking for the wrong
> thing. The auto stores give me a little round flasher with 2 prongs(which
> is what I am used to) but I cannot find anything like that on my truck!
> What I am seeing as my flasher is on the engine side of the firewall with
a
> fuse on it.... Help?

Any part store worth its salt should have this item....I think you have
what you need already, but you are looking in the wrong place for your
original. Try under the dash near the steering column.

Stock Man
1967 Galaxie 500 Convertible (HELP!---I need 15 x5 factory rims)
1967 F-250 FE 390 4wd
1966 F-250 I6 240 2wd LWB Flare Side
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Date: Wed, 01 Dec 1999 16:49:21 -0600
From: Stu Varner
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - Water heated 4v carb spacer

I have one waiting to go on a wild FE someday......I may opt not to use it
though.
Mine is off of a C5 casting intake.

Stu
Nuke GM!

At 07:54 PM 11/29/99 -0600, you wrote:
>Folks,
>Is there such thing as a water heated 4v carb spacer as discussed last
>month pertaining to fuel economy? I dug through a pile of manifolds at
>the junk yard and found a couple of Ford water heated 2v carb spacers,
>but no 4v versions.
>Has anybody ever seen one? What applications?
>Thanks,
>Brett
>Super75cab
>300 w/Offie intake, 87 split exhaust manifolds, and consequently no heat.
>
>___________________________________________________________________
>Get the Internet just the way you want it.
>Free software, free e-mail, and free Internet access for a month!
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>
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Date: Wed, 01 Dec 1999 16:55:13 -0600
From: David.R.John deluxe.com
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Loose steering

Gary,

can you elaborate on this:

>--If you determine the box adjuster is the culprit then you need to find
the
>--exact center of movement in the box and take the lash out at that point
but
>--do not get it too tight.

Is this where I take the arm off find the center of the steering? Once I
find the center what is the process of taking the lash out, just loosen nut
and turn the screw thing? Which way.......(the way that makes it tight I
suppose).

Thanks for your help.

David

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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 16:22:16 -0700
From: "Dave Resch"
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - First firing.....the whole story

>From: Stu Varner
>Subject: FTE 61-79 - First firing.....the whole story
>
>There is nothing like the sound of a big block
>FE!! Even though I love my 4.6 Romeo mod motor
>in my Crown Vic, today's motors simply don't
>have the same old feel as a
>335 (how's that Daver?), FE or 385.

Yo Stu:

That brought tears to my eyes... to have my beloved M-block mentioned fondly in
the same sentence as the glorious FE and almighty 460... it's touching, man.
Now that I'm emotionally moved by all these FE first firings (CJ's disco 428
last week and now Stu's 360... sniff sniff!) I'm inspired to tell my Ford truck
biography.

I live in Louisville, Colorado (just a couple miles from CJ, whom I met through
this FTE list almost 2 years ago). I work for Sybase, Inc. as a technical
writer. I have done technical and marketing communications, and various other
sorts of comp-geek/writing stuff for almost 20 years. I'm 42 years old, married
(2nd time) to a beautiful and brilliant woman w/ the intellectual prowess and
perspicacity to appreciate my Ford truck hobby and all the truck parts
cluttering up our garage. We have a 3 year old son and my 15 year old son (from
prev. marriage) lives w/ us.

I was born and raised in west Texas and I grew up w/ 3/4 ton Ford trucks w/ V8
engines and 4-speed transmissions. My dad's first was a 1962 F250 4x2 w/ a
camper shell and homebuilt interior. I remember camping in that truck w/ my
family everywhere from Big Bend, TX to Chaco Canyon, NM. Dad replaced it w/ a
1967 F250 4x2 w/ an FE352. After he sold the '62, we built another camper for
the '67 w/ an insulated shell and our own interior. A few years later, Dad
bought a 1972 F250 4x2 w/ an FE360. We moved the shell from the '67 to the '72
and rebuilt the interior. Dad was a federal civil service engineer/technician
who had his own oscilloscopes and fixed everything in the house when it broke
down (including TVs) and always bought the shop manuals when he got a new
vehicle and did all the maintenance himself. I learned a lot from him. I
started helping w/ tune-ups and oil changes when I was about 12. At age 16, I
helped him rebuild the 352 in the '67. It was the first time I had seen the
inside of an engine.

During my last two years of impoverished college student life at Texas A&M, I
drove a KZ650 because it was cheaper to feed and maintain than a Ford truck, and
besides, it had a certain nihilistic, post-adolescent immortality panache.
After I graduated w/ a degree in English, I owned a string of zippy little rice
grinders and a VW Bug before I bought my first (and so far only) new car, a 1984
Tempo. Sadly, that was not a great re-introduction to the Ford family of fine
vehicles. As soon as it was paid for, the Tempo went and then I owned a variety
of foreign sedans until I finally saw The Light and bought my 1980 F250 4x4
(351M, NP435) w/ 120K miles from its second owner in 1993. Now my truck has
230K miles total, about 170K on the M-block.

Before that, I had never heard of that crowning achievement of Ford engineering,
which I fondly refer to as the "M-block." I immediately started buying books
for my truck, including Tom Monroe's "How to Rebuild Ford V8 Engines." About a
year later, a friend wanted to rebuild the 351M in his 1978 F250, and flush w/
my newfound knowledge and enthusiasm, I talked him into converting it into a 400
and letting me help w/ the project. We got a 400 crank from a '75 LTD, had the
rods bushed for KB hypereut 351C pistons, and added an E'brock 4V carb on an
E'brock EGR manifold and Heddman headers. Now that truck has 80K miles on the
rebuild and it's still going strong.

Since then, I've been involved w/ a couple more 400 build-ups (including another
351M-to-400 conversion). The last one was an over-the-top project for a guy w/
a '79 F350 4x4. Through some connections, we got that engine on a Superflow
SF-901 dynamometer and measured it at 485 lb-ft torque 4000 rpm and 388 hp
5200 rpm. Even though he was willing to spend foolishly, we still made a lot of
mistakes (especially under-camming it). When the Hot Rod article claimed
similar numbers from a much less extravagant M-block build-up, it confirmed my
faith in the relatively easy power to be had from the M-block.

Now I'm planning my next M-block, which will go in my truck. CJ likes to refer
to his early '70s cherry red F100 as the "disco" rig, so I like to think of my
'80s F250 w/ its beaten white paint, rotted out fenders, tweaked bed, and trail
scratches as the "punk rok" rig.

Dave R. (M-block devotee)


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Date: Wed, 01 Dec 1999 15:46:10 -0800
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - RE: Compressors

George wrote:
>I have a 5hp Craftsman oilless, 25 gal, that I have had since about 1994,
>and it has run continuously for the past 3 years. That's right, I never
>switch it off. It even was flooded in Hurricane Floyd, and flipped over
>while plugged in and running and was underwater. I retrieved it, flipped
>it over, pulled the drain plug and let it run for a couple of minutes to
>get the water out, and it has been running since. So my longevity
>estimation is good.

It sounds like you have indeed gotten very good service out of your
compressor! Most of the oilless compressors I've worked on seem to
eat up the rubber diaghram if used hard for long periods.

Just out of curiosity, what do you use yours for that requires it
to run continuosly? When you say "runs continuously" do you mean
you just never switch it off, but the pressure switch turns it
on and off when the air demand is there, or do you mean the motor is
*always* running and moving a continuous supply of air for something?
That's a lot of air to be moving... whatcha do with it all?
I never turn mine off either (probably hasn't been "off" for more
than a few dozen days in 19 years), but it only comes on and works
for an average of a couple hours a day when there's a demand for air...


>Now as to size. This is the largest capacity unit that you can plug into
>110V and a 20A breaker. This is important to me, as sometimes I use the
>compressor at locations other than my house (OK, so I do turn it off to
>transport it, but that is less than an hour usually, then I plug it in as
>soon as I arrive as destination.) Also, it is the largest tank and
>compressor I can pick up and put in the bed of my truck by myself with no
>ramp.

Yep, "small enough to be portable" is a good thing sometimes. I don't
move mine often, but when I have a job where I need it somewhere else
it sure is handy to be able to load it in a truck without any help.
Of course, now that I have "on board air" on the truck I don't need
to move it as often as I used to...

Steve
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Date: Wed, 01 Dec 1999 15:46:13 -0800
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Water heated 4v carb spacer

>Okay Steve, lets move you North a few hundred miles, and inland another
>couple hundred ...

Actually, the thought of doing that very thing has occured to me
pretty often. Who knows, in a couple more years I may be trying
that experiment. (-:

>suddenly you're going from July temps peaking 100+ to
>winter temps bottoming out -30 or so ... to have any hope of maintaining a
>comparable mixture between winter and summer you've got to do something to
>stabilize the carb temp when its warmed up ... at -30 that engine
>compartment is big enough to chill even the exhaust manifold somewhat it
>seems...

Do you really have problems with it even once the motor is warmed up?
Does it have a fully functional exhaust heat stove?
The coldest temps mine has seen is around -5F when I took it to play
in the snow last year. It performed flawlessly at those temps, but
I've never "tested" it at -30... (-:

>Anyway that's my argument for a water heated carb plate ... granted there is
>still some movement through the seasons, at least the truck is driveable
>this way ...

Well, you gotta do what you gotta do.
I suppose if I was forced to use the water heated spacer I'd probably
put a good heat insulating spacer on the manifold, put the heated spacer
on top of that, then the carb. I'd put a shutoff valve on the water inlet
to the spacer so I could shut it off in hot weather and turn it on in
cold. Maybe that would be the best of both worlds...

Steve
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Date: Wed, 01 Dec 1999 15:46:12 -0800
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Water heated 4v carb spacer

Gary wrote:
>Well.....as usual I was getting into the thory of it :-) I tend to agree
>with you Steve but I do know that hotter inlet air runs much more
>efficiently at low rpms and low loads such as idle and cruise which is where
>most of your economy comes from so this unit may help in that area, not
>really sure.

Yep, I agree that warmer air temps help atomization and economy,
but I doubt that a 3/4" thick heated specer under the carb does
much to heat the large mass of air that passes thru it.
Mostly it just heats the carb, which I don't think is
neccesarily a good thing. A good heat stove on the air inlet
is likely to do a much better job of warming the air and promoting
good atomization, and if you have the thermostatically controlled,
vacuum operated flap in the snorkel it will give warm air at low
speeds when you want it, but shut off the warm air at wider throttle
openings where the cooler denser air will make better power.

>My guess is that the coolant temp will remain stable enough
>that the carb should never boil unless you have a hot soak problem which
>elevates the coolant temps to boiling when you shut it off.

Sure. it's fairly stable once the motor is up to temp, but it takes
quite a while for the coolant to come up to temp on a cold morning.
That first 5 minutes in the morning is when I *want* the carb heat,
and the "water heated spacer" doesn't help until much later than that.
That's whay I like the exhaust heat stove. It's starting to put useful
heat into the air within the first minute. Hell, my 390 takes at least
5 minutes of running to even get the coolant temp gauge to move, and
several more minutes to get up to a "normal" operating temp.
A heated carb spacer ain't doin nuthin until the coolant is hot...

>Of course the boiling point of gasoline is much lower than water so.....???

Yup. Sure is...


Steve
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Date: Wed, 01 Dec 1999 15:46:14 -0800
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump

Gary wrote:

>Only Steve can answer this.....

Only me? Wow! I'll bet that somewhere in the world *someone* else
has been inside a mechanical fuel pump before! I'll just bet
those Ford engineers know what's in one...

>but I believe the mechancal pumps have a
>spring between the arm and the diaphram which limits the pressure they can
>generate as well, not a regulator as such so, again, if you have less
>resistance on the one side of the pump it is possible to generate more than
>the spring would indicate.

That's pretty much correct. When the arm is pushed, it moves the
diaghram downward against spring pressure and fuel is drawn in through
the inlet check valve. When the arm is released, the spring moves the
diaghram back upward, forcing fuel thru the outlet check valve.
The fuel pressure is determined by the spring pressure divided by
the area of the diaghram. Outlet pressure remains fairly constant
regardless of flow.

>If the last mechanism in the line indeed does have a regulator then the
>static pressure in the output line would determine the pump output pressure
>and you would be absolutely right :-) If all of them are controlled by
>spring pressure then they could accumulate since the spring only maintains a
>measured difference between the input and output of each device.....:-)

I been thinking about that one. I think that if 2 pumps are in series,
that the total fuel pressure will be whichever the highest pressure pump
puts out, not the sum of the 2. (IE: if you have a 7psi mechanical pump
with a 10psi electric in front of it, the total pressure will be 10psi,
not 17).
If the first pump makes more pressure than the mechanical pump it will
simply force the diaghram in the mechanical pump all the way in one
direction against the spring and it will stay there and not move.
No pumping action will take place in the mechanical pump in this case.
Remember, the diaghram only sees spring pressure plus atmospheric
air pressure on the back side and is not referenced to inlet pressure
in anyway.
Inlet pressure looks the same to it as outlet pressure since they both
move the diaghram in the same direction, against spring pressure.

Steve
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Date: Wed, 01 Dec 1999 15:46:15 -0800
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - mech fuel pump repair

Azie wrote:
>>Steve DeL. writes: >>I also like the fact that if a mechanical pump dies
>>out in the middle
>> of nowhere it's possible to disassemble and possibly repair it on the
>>spot.

>Don't all the Mechanicals built in the last 15 years or so have rivits
>instead of bolts holding it together??? The ones I have are rivited - All
>of them. removing them out in the boondocks would be a task.

When I put my FE together about 3 years ago I bought a new fuel pump
for it. It's one of the ones with the big fuel filter built right
in to the bottom of it. No rivets, just a bunch of screws hold it
together. It comes apart in about 2 minutes with a screwdriver.
I could probably remove it from the engine, dissect it, reassemble it
and reinstall it in less than 10 minutes, and if faced with a long walk
would not hesitate a bit to do so. The odds are pretty good that it
could be fixed well enough to get it somewhere else to work on.
When you're faced with a long walk in the rain it's amazing what
you can "fix" with a bit of bailing wire and some duct tape!

>I, too, prefer the mechanical pumps, but I'm not so sure I'd want to
>disassemble one out in the boondocks and repair it, B U T, if it was that,
>or walk a hundred or so miles, you can bet I'd be driving out those rivits.

You betcha. But with the "screwed together" type, my threshold would
probably only be about 5 miles... (-:

Steve
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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 15:46:50 -0800 (PST)
From: Pat Brown
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - Loose steering

David asks:
>
> Gary,
>
> can you elaborate on this:
>
> >--If you determine the box adjuster is the culprit then you need to find
> the
> >--exact center of movement in the box and take the lash out at that point
> but
> >--do not get it too tight.
>
> Is this where I take the arm off find the center of the steering? Once I

Yep. Removing the Pitman arm is the only way to adjust this properly.

> find the center what is the process of taking the lash out, just loosen nut
> and turn the screw thing? Which way.......(the way that makes it tight I
> suppose).

Probably depends on which box - Manual/Power, Ford or Bendix. Someone here
will know the correct procedure. Usual adjustment is for torque over
center on the input shaft.
- --
Pat Brown
Sebastopol, California
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Date: Wed, 01 Dec 1999 15:56:43 -0800
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - Missed emails

> And on that note does anyone knbow where I can find the turn signal
>flasher for my '66 F100? I have tried 3 diff auto stores and Dennis
>Carpenter and cannot find it... Although I might be looking for the wrong
>thing. The auto stores give me a little round flasher with 2 prongs(which
>is what I am used to) but I cannot find anything like that on my truck!

The little round 2-prong one should be the right one for your truck.
It's generally located up under the dash, behind the instrument cluster.
There's probably 2 flshers up there, one for the turn signals and
one for the 4-way (emergency) lights.
The turn signal one is the one that's higher up and harder to reach
of the two...

>What I am seeing as my flasher is on the engine side of the firewall with a
>fuse on it.... Help?

Hmmmm, dunno what you got there... horn relay?

Steve
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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 20:47:13 -0600
From: Brett L Habben
Subject: FTE 61-79 - Re: T18 kits

Gary,
Thanks for the tips. My J p source has them for $168 but I was looking
for a Ford source.
Brett
Super75cab
>All the bronco boys have kits for the various trannys used and perhaps
the
>T-18 too. Try Tom's bronco parts or Jeff's bronco graveyard among
others
>listed in the 4x43 mags.
>Michigan, Pot Hole Jumping,
>78 Bronco Loving, Gary

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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 20:36:13 -0600
From: Brett L Habben
Subject: FTE 61-79 - Re: Cummins Turbo in a Ford

John,
False alert. Ford put Cummins 4BT's in E350 cube vans, A 6BT may be a
stretch, but same engine family. I've looked into the 4BT swap because
nobody makes a diesel 1/2 ton with about a 4 liter turbo diesel. That's
really what I could use, but couldn't cost justify it. A Powerstroke 7.3
is overkill for me.
Brett
Super75cab
>Sorry, Jeff. No it wouldn't be neat IMNSHO. Diesels are great for the
>highway, great for folks with big bucks for repair, great for
businessmen
>who need big write offs. Ditto for a turbo. Everyone I know personally
who
>bought one as a personal land yacht has since gone back to gasoline.
Except
>my little brother and he never had much sense anyway plus he has only
had
>his about a year. Crewcab, Powerstroke, 4x4, six speed manual, 1 ton. I
>wouldn't take it as a gift.
>Besides, if it ain't a Ford option engine it ain't a Ford anymore,
right?
>Aren't those the rules? What's the diff between putting in a Cummings
and
>putting in a Caddy 472? Wrong brand either way.
>Flame retardant drawers on and secured....
>- -- John
>jlagrone ford-trucks.com
>1979 F150 Custom LWB Regular Cab 351M C6 (Henry)
>http://www.ford-trucks.com/jlagrone/henry.home.htm
>Dearborn iron rules!!!!
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Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 21:04:07 -0600
From: Brett L Habben
Subject: FTE 61-79 - Re: Water heated 4v carb spacer

Folks,
Thanks to all of you for responding on the heated carb spacer. It sounds
like they were used on alot of FE's in the 60's. The reason I need one
is that this is for a 300/6 Offie intake w/390 holley paired with a set
of '87 EFI split exhaust manifolds. This combination does not allow you
to use the standard heat riser for fuel vaporization, so I'm looking for
another way to achieve this to improve mileage. I find it hard to
believe Ford would have gone through the expense of adding this plate if
it was not effective in some way.
Back to the junkyards....
Brett
Super75cab

>>Gary wrote:
>> The advantage is that it
>>keeps the carb at a constant temp, neither too hot nor too cold so fuel
>>vaporization happens more consistantly giving better economy and low
speed
>>performance.

> I suppose they might be helpful if you live in extreme cold
temperatures,
>or if you've got a Holley or some other carb that doesn't atomize worth
>beans at low velocities, but personally I found best performance (both
> high and low speed) by using an insulating spacer under the carb to
>keep the heat *out* of it. I most definately don't want a spacer with
> 180F coolant flowing thru it, since boiling the carb bowl dry every
>time I park doesn't seem like a good way to improve gas mileage...
>I think the best thing to help low speed atomization is a good
>working "heat stove" on the exhaust manifold to preheat the incoming
>air at low speeds, and also a working heat crossover passage in the
>floor of the intake manifold. I'm unconvinced of the value of a heated
>spacer under the carb. I usually spend some effort to try and keep that
>area cool...
> Steve
> http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.sonic.net/~sdelanty

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------------------------------

Date: Wed, 01 Dec 1999 22:01:23 -0600
From: Stu Varner
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - mech fuel pump repair

> When I put my FE together about 3 years ago I bought a new fuel pump
> for it. It's one of the ones with the big fuel filter built right
> in to the bottom of it. No rivets, just a bunch of screws hold it
> together. It comes apart in about 2 minutes with a screwdriver.

Exactly as mine is.....I bought a new Carter (not rebuilt) when I assembled
my engine
this summer. I paid maybe 25 bucks for it at the local parts house. 12.00
for rebuilt ones here....they are junk!!!
I went through three of them in 1500 miles of driving.

When I am finally up and running around on a more regular basis in my
truck, I am sure I will have
another new one [fuel pump and hemastats for the fuel line - no comments
Deacon!! 8^) ]
stuck in the emergency kit along with radiator hoses and clamps etc. so in
the event I ever get stranded in the middle of Egypt (I live near the edge
now) I can perform a quick fix and go on.

For a few bucks, a guy can have a solid emergency road repair kit made from
new and "decent" used parts.


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------------------------------

Date: Wed, 01 Dec 1999 20:03:00 -0700
From: "Kiernan, Denny"
Subject: FTE 61-79 - Mysterious parts FTE 61-79 -

The Chilton book (which is all I have to go by so far) says that '72
Ford pickups should have the spark delay valve replaced every 12 mos or
12000 miles. I asked the auto parts store and a mechanic what a spark
delay valve is, and neither had heard of it, nor is it listed on the
auto parts' computer.

Another item: I got a AAA diagnosis done on the truck one time and
listed under the emission components is the comment that the KV filter
needs to be replaced. Again, nobody I've talked to has ever heard of a
KV filter. (The mechanic who did the diagnosis is no longer available
for asking.)

Last one: What does EVP stand for?

Thanks in advance.

Denny
'72 F-100 360 2WD Manual everything, 140K
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------------------------------

Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 20:19:17 -0800 (PST)
From: Jayson Spangler
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - cab on, no brakes

Gary,

Mine has standard brakes so no booster. I took another
look at it and discovered I'd put the bellcrank
linkage on the wrong side of the pedal. I corrected
that and it solved most of the problem. Then I lubed
the pin in the pedal (as per your instructions)and I
have brakes again. Now I have to figure out my
electrical hook ups. The cab is wired for A/c which I
don't have. This'll be fun

Thanks for your hepl so far

Jayson
- --- "Peters, Gary (G.R.)"
wrote:
> Yes, you need to remove the booster and the
> bellcrank linkage behind it and
> take it apart and clean and lube it. The pivot pins
> have seized and won't
> allow the pedal to return. There is also a pin in
> the pedal itself which
> should have a plastic bushing and therefore needs no
> lube but you can lub
> that too if you like or if you find it is metal to
> metal. The booster and
> MC springs are the only return springs on the brake
> pedal AFAIK.
>
> --
> Michigan, Pot Hole Jumping,
> 78 Bronco Loving, Gary
>
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.thewowfactor.com/bigbroncos/detail.cfm?detailid=167
> --
>
> > press on the brakes, they'll stop the truck just
> fine,
> > however the pedal wont come back up unless I pull
> it
> > up.
> >
> > Anyone have any Ideas?
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>

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------------------------------

Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 22:41:31 -0800
From: "Charles T."
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - painting the frame

I second the POR 15 motion. I also used it on my federwells, engine,
driveshafts, accessories, floor pans, and brake booster. Super product. I
even used to to paint my old utility trailer.

www.hal-pc.org/~charlest/ford.html

Charlest
1979 F150 4x4(460 swap)
1979 F150 2x4(hot 302)

> Jeff wrote:
> >My engine's coming out of my 79 Bronco tomorrow and I have the standard
> >array of oven cleaner and high-heat paint for degreasing and
beautification
> >of the engine & parts - but I have been wondering about painting the
frame
> >as well, as I will be moving to the coast next year...
> >
> >What paint did you use?
> >
> Here's how I did it. Degreasing was accomplished using a Castrol product....


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