From: owner-61-79-list-digest ford-trucks.com (61-79-list-digest)
To: 61-79-list-digest ford-trucks.com
Subject: 61-79-list-digest V3 #442
Reply-To: 61-79-list ford-trucks.com
Sender: owner-61-79-list-digest ford-trucks.com
Errors-To: owner-61-79-list-digest ford-trucks.com
Precedence: bulk


61-79-list-digest Wednesday, December 1 1999 Volume 03 : Number 442



=======================================================================
Ford Truck Enthusiasts - 1961-1979 Trucks and Vans
Visit our web site: http://www.ford-trucks.com/
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
To unsubscribe, send email to:
majordomo ford-trucks.com
with the words "unsubscribe 61-79-list-digest" in the body of the
message.
=======================================================================
In this issue:

RE: FTE 61-79 - T18 Rebuild kits sources
RE: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump
RE: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump
FTE 61-79 - Just when i thought things wer going well
FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump
RE: FTE 61-79 - Water heated 4v carb spacer
Re: FTE 61-79 - FE Electric Fuel Pump?
RE: FTE 61-79 - Just when i thought things wer going well
RE: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump
FTE 61-79 - Mo info--FE 352 HELP!
Re: FTE 61-79 - going to Colorado, need parts!
Re: FTE 61-79 - Best Compressor
FTE 61-79 - Colorado Parts
Re: FTE 61-79 - Water heated 4v carb spacer
Re: FTE 61-79 - Tetraethyl Lead
Re: FTE 61-79 - Was Electric Fuel Pump/now insurance disclaimer
FTE 61-79 - Re: Mo info--FE 352 HELP!
RE: FTE 61-79 - Apprenticeship
FTE 61-79 - FE/Fuel pump
FTE 61-79 - looking for power windows - '78 F100
FTE 61-79 - Pump Blocking plate 390 FE
Re: FTE 61-79 - Tetraethyl Lead
FTE 61-79 - Zero Oil Pressure
Re: FTE 61-79 - Tetraethyl Lead
Re: FTE 61-79 - Zero Oil Pressure
FTE 61-79 - Brake problem
Re: FTE 61-79 - FE Electric Fuel Pump?
Re: FTE 61-79 - FE Electric Fuel Pump?
Re: FTE 61-79 - Brake problem
FTE 61-79 - RE: Compressors
Re: FTE 61-79 - Brake problem
Re: FTE 61-79 - A LIL MO' INFO.........

=======================================================================

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 15:18:58 -0500
From: "Peters, Gary (G.R.)"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - T18 Rebuild kits sources

All the bronco boys have kits for the various trannys used and perhaps the
T-18 too. Try Tom's bronco parts or Jeff's bronco graveyard among others
listed in the 4x43 mags.

- --
Michigan, Pot Hole Jumping,
78 Bronco Loving, Gary
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.thewowfactor.com/bigbroncos/detail.cfm?detailid=167
- --

> Folks,
> Anybody know any sources for T-18 rebuild kits?
== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 15:30:34 -0500
From: tfreeman murphyfarms.com
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump

>In series, just put the electric at the back like you would if it was a
>stand alone unit, and put the mechanical at the front like if it was a stand
>alone unit (stock) ... use the same line between them, both pumps should be
>able to bypass the other if it fails ...

I think this is the part I don't understand....the pumps have an internal
bypass??
I thought one of the problems with the mechanical was that when it broke it
sometimes pushes gas into the block...wouldn't the electric compound the
problem??

Or are you talking about putting a physical bypass in, like y connectors before
and after the pumps and change the line up with some type of valve??

Help Me!! I've got a mental block going on with this....

Thanks,

- -Ted









== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 14:50:03 -0600
From: "William S. Hart"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump

> >In series, just put the electric at the back like you would if it was a
> >stand alone unit, and put the mechanical at the front like if it
> was a stand
> >alone unit (stock) ... use the same line between them, both
> pumps should be
> >able to bypass the other if it fails ...
>
> I think this is the part I don't understand....the pumps have an internal
> bypass??

Nope ...

> I thought one of the problems with the mechanical was that when
> it broke it
> sometimes pushes gas into the block...wouldn't the electric compound the
> problem??
>

Nope ... what happens there is the siphon valve quits and allows the fluid
to back flow towards the tank ... the way these pumps work they will allow
fluid to pass through them even though they aren't pumping as much as is
being pulled through ... for instance when a fuel pump goes out (mechanical)
do you notice right away? Dad drove clear home one time when one went out
... it can siphon the gas from the tank to the carb even though the
mechanical is dead ... this is also true if the mechanical is alive ...

I haven't really played with either type of pump other than in the
theoretical realm, but they operate on a neat siphon principal that allows
you to push the fluid through even if the pump isn't active.

Maybe someone who's torn these apart can explain it better ...

Just my $.02
wish

96 Mustang GT 5spd 4.6L
73ish 1/2ton 4x4 6.4L
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.public.iastate.edu/~wish

== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 12:55:57 -0800
From: "Pat"
Subject: FTE 61-79 - Just when i thought things wer going well

Hi John,
Gotta love those Fords. Without even a whimper, they do their duty when most
other trucks would have died.
Good luck with the Dana 60 hunt.
Pat
> Date: Tue, 02 Nov 1999 02:09:21 -0800
> From: John Lord
> Subject: FTE 61-79 - Just when i thought things wer going well
>
> It's been 6 months without any problems with my 74 F250 Crew Cab, even
> had the cash saved up to convert to power steering, But alas their is
> always something.
>
> I thought i would change the oil in my front diff and fix the slow leak
> and when i got in their i found i have lost 75% of 3 teeth on my crown
> gear, and the pinion looks like a small rodent has been chewing on it.
> (it was so quiet too)
> I guess it's time to start looking for a Dana 60 front end


== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 15:09:21 -0600
From: "John LaGrone"
Subject: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump

>>Neither pump is supposed to put out more than 7# but together they may
exceed that.

Well, ding dang it, I can't resist. So if one pump puts out 7# and two put
out 14# does 10 make 70#? If output is set by a pressure relief valve, it
doesn't matter if there are 7000 pumps running, you won't exceed 7# or
whatever the highest relief valve is set to. :-) An alternative to a
regulator would be a return line creating a fuel rail like an FI system
uses. Also, for some reason I've heard it said that electrics are more prone
to vapor lock so keep your fuel lines away from hot exhausts, etc. It never
did make any sense to me as to why an electric would be more susceptible.

- -- John
jlagrone ford-trucks.com
1979 F150 Custom LWB Regular Cab 351M C6 (Henry)
http://www.ford-trucks.com/jlagrone/henry.home.htm
Dearborn iron rules!!!!
== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 13:23:08 -0800
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Water heated 4v carb spacer

Gary wrote:
>This would be easy to make if you can't find one. I'm sure Steve will have
>the plans drawn up in a few minutes for us :-)

Ummm, sure. I'll draw it up if You wanna make one!

> The advantage is that it
>keeps the carb at a constant temp, neither too hot nor too cold so fuel
>vaporization happens more consistantly giving better economy and low speed
>performance.

I suppose they might be helpful if you live in extreme cold temperatures,
or if you've got a Holley or some other carb that doesn't atomize worth
beans at low velocities, but personally I found best performance (both
high and low speed) by using an insulating spacer under the carb to
keep the heat *out* of it. I most definately don't want a spacer with
180F coolant flowing thru it, since boiling the carb bowl dry every
time I park doesn't seem like a good way to improve gas mileage...
I think the best thing to help low speed atomization is a good
working "heat stove" on the exhaust manifold to preheat the incoming
air at low speeds, and also a working heat crossover passage in the
floor of the intake manifold. I'm unconvinced of the value of a heated
spacer under the carb. I usually spend some effort to try and keep that
area cool...

Steve
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.sonic.net/~sdelanty

== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 13:23:07 -0800
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - FE Electric Fuel Pump?

>BDIJXS aol.com wrote:
>>
>> Who has put in an electric fuel pump for their FE?
>>
>> Do these units usually have the "safety cutoff switch" (in case of wreck)
>> built in, or is that usually something extra?

Don replied:
>I believe Steve D. put one in his truck. Steve you still out there?
>I'm not sure if he has a write up on it or not.

No sir... not me. I don't particularly like electric pumps.
They're usually noisy, and my experiance is that they are quite a
lot less reliable than a mechanical pump. I've been left walking
by electric pumps before...
I've heard some folks on this list complain that the mechanical FE pump
is unreliable, but I've never seen any evidence of it. I've worked on
quite a few FE's and I've only seen one dead fuel pump. That one had
over 120K miles on it which I consider to be a reasonably long life.
I seriously doubt you can get most electric pumps to last that long.
I also like the fact that if a mechanical pump dies out in the middle
of nowhere it's possible to disassemble and possibly repair it on the
spot. With most electrics, you choices would be to walk or hitch-hike..
The only way I'd run an electric pump is if I had an engine that was
modified enough that the stock pump couldn't keep up with the fuel
demand anymore. That's a lot of fuel.

There's also the safety issue with electric pumps.
For folks that are installing electric pumps, *PLEASE* use some kind
of auto shutoff device on it. Either use one of the new "inertia
switches" (readily available in wrecking yards), or at least wire it
through an oil pressure cut off switch so it stops if the engine
quits running. Both an oil pressure cutoff AND an inertia switch
would be my first choice. Otherwise if you are in an accident and
the fuel line is severed, the electric pump will spew the entire
contents of your gas tank out on the ground unless someone is
conscious enough to turn the key off. Not a very safe thing...

Gary is right, if there is a fire and your insurance company finds
out that you've made an "unsafe modification" to the fuel system
(a pump wired direct to 12v with no shutoff switch is definately
an unsafe mod!) they may very well refuse coverage. If someone else
is seriously injured because of it, you could be in a whole new
world of trouble...

I think I posted an ASCII drawing on this list some time ago showing
a couple possible ways to wire a fuel pump through an oil pressure
switch. I don't seem to have a copy of that message anymore, but
perhaps someone else saved a copy and could repost it if anyone
needs to know how to wire up an electric pump.


Steve
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.sonic.net/~sdelanty

== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 15:24:35 -0600
From: "William S. Hart"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Just when i thought things wer going well

> > I guess it's time to start looking for a Dana 60 front end
>

Seems like there's one listed on the FTE site under the classifieds ... if I
remember right I noticed it 'cause it wasn't too far from me, which likely
means its far away from almost every one else on the list :)

Just my $.02
wish

96 Mustang GT 5spd 4.6L
73ish 1/2ton 4x4 6.4L
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.public.iastate.edu/~wish

== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 15:45:04 -0600
From: "William S. Hart"
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Electric Fuel Pump

> >>Neither pump is supposed to put out more than 7# but together they may
> exceed that.
>
> Well, ding dang it, I can't resist. So if one pump puts out 7# and two put
> out 14# does 10 make 70#? If output is set by a pressure relief valve, it
> doesn't matter if there are 7000 pumps running, you won't exceed 7# or
> whatever the highest relief valve is set to. :-)

I see what you're saying John, and you are correct, but what I meant was
that there are "pulses" associated with all these motors and pumps running,
they may be small, but they are pulses none the less ... and if they end up
in a constructive harmony (slim chance, but possible) you will get spikes
over 7# and possibly enough to unseat the needle at an inappropriate time
...

> An alternative to a
> regulator would be a return line creating a fuel rail like an FI system
> uses.

Yup, the new ones of course have stopped that .. the 98+ 'stangs for
instance ..


> Also, for some reason I've heard it said that electrics are
> more prone
> to vapor lock so keep your fuel lines away from hot exhausts,
> etc. It never
> did make any sense to me as to why an electric would be more susceptible.
>


I'll second you on that one, that makes no sense :)

Just my $.02
wish

96 Mustang GT 5spd 4.6L
73ish 1/2ton 4x4 6.4L
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.public.iastate.edu/~wish

== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 15:21:38 -0800
From: "Bill Deacon"
Subject: FTE 61-79 - Mo info--FE 352 HELP!

Hello everyone---My name is Bill and I live in Garden Grove, Ca.(near
Disneyland).I am one of those guys that have been on the list for a couple
of years and seldom post anything. I've learned a great deal(Gary, you're a
genious). I'm 40 years old but I still act like I'm 16. I've been divorced
for 10 years and have a 17 year old daughter that lives with me(and tells me
what to do). I've had all kinds of cars but Fords are definately my
favorite. Something that I really hate is seeing P*** ON FORD, and P*** ON
CH*VY, when we all should have P*** ON IMPORTS stickers on the back of our
trucks. Let us all take a moment to thank God for American iron regardless
of the make.
I have a '66 F-250 with 82,000 actual miles(spent a lot of time in a
driveway with a camper sitting on it). The engine--352, 2 barrel, runs great
and burns no oil. I've installed a Pertronix ignition, which I am very happy
with by the way, and plan on installing headers this week-end. While at my
parents house at Lake Havasu this past week-end I picked up a stock 4 barrel
intake at a garage sale for $15. So now I plan on installing that also. I am
thinking about putting a new Edelbrock 600 cfm carb on it. Is this a good
choice? Also, since I will have the intake off, is it a good idea to replace
the timing chain, cam and lifters. If so, what cam should I put in it. I use
the truck as a daily driver,and have 4:10 gears in the rear, so mileage is a
factor. Any other suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks ! Bill

== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 17:35:29 -0600
From: "Jason & Kathy Kendrick"
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - going to Colorado, need parts!

When I bought my '70 F100, it'd spent all it's life in the
Durango/Silverton area. It was in great shape with no rust at all. It
did have a lot of rock chips in the paint and windsheild, though.

Jason Kendrick
== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 15:44:12 -0800
From: sdelanty sonic.net
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - Best Compressor

It's been a long time since I've been compressor shopping, so
I've no idea what the "best" compressor is these days...
I've got a 2HP/20gal Craftsman that I bought new in 1980.
I got it for about 1/2 price because it was a "repaired" unit.
It was new, but the tank had been damaged in shipping. The
tank was replaced, but since it had been "repaired" it couldn't
be sold as a regular "new" item, so the price was extremely
reasonable. I have used it *very* hard in the last 19 years and
it has never let me down. It still even has the origional drive belt...
It gets it's oil changed at least once a year.

Mine is rated at 7.5CFM 90PSI. Max PSI is 125.
This is adequate for all the air tools I use, except for my die grinder
and sand blaster (I once sand blasted an entire VW bus, inside and out
with it!)[don't ask...]
I wish it was about 12 CFM, but I'm not in the market for a new one
until this one dies, which could be awhile.

When buying, look at the CFM and pressure ratings of the biggest air
tools you are likely to use it with. Make sure the compressor is rated
for at least that amount. Bigger is better, as long as you have the
electrical service to run it.
Don't let yourself be fooled by HP ratings, as they are useless on a
lot of new compressors. Many use a "Lying sack of $#!%" rating on
the motors that includes max torque when running on the "start"
windings. This is pure BS.

Example:
Several years ago, a friend bought a brand new *5HP* Craftsman compressor.
I was at his house drooling over his new toy, and realized that even
though it was "5" HP, the CFM rating was only about 20% higher than
my 2HP... What's up with that?
We looked at the motor and found that it was rated for a current draw
of 9.6 amps at 240v. Let's see... that's 9.6 x 240 = 2304 watt's.
Hmmmm, since there's 746 watt's in 1 HP, that means that if this motor
is 100% efficient, it could only make a maximum of 3.1 HP!
Assuming some reasonable efficiency, this motor was probably actually
about 2.5 HP, NOT the 5 HP claimed on the motor nameplate.
This seems to be a somewhat common thing these days since I've seen
several other brands that use this "ficticious HP" rating.
It seems like fraud to me... I don't know how they get away with it.

Anyway, the point is, use the CFM ratings to choose a compressor, and
don't worry about the HP rating which may or may not be ficticious
anyway.

Tank size is a matter of personal preferance and usage habits.
Larger tanks let the motor run longer to fill the tank and then
stay off longer while you use air from the tank. This means less
"start/stop" cycles, which is better for the motor.
On the other hand, big tanks take a long time to fill and can be a little
frustrating when you haven't used it for a while, the tank is empty,
and you have to wait 15 minutes to get enough air pressure to do a
2 minute job...
As long as your air system is totally leak free, a big tank is probably
better as long as you intend to keep the compressor in one spot.
Smaller "horizontal" tanks that have wheels have the advantage that
they are more portable. Once in a while I load mine up in the truck
and take it somewhere, so portable is nice for me. If it's just
going to sit in one spot in the garage, then a verticle tank is nice
since they eat up less floor space.

Pumps:
If you intend to use a compressor very much, *don't* get an oilless.
They won't last near as long as a good wet crankcase piston type pump.
Oilless is nice for spray painting though, since the outlet air
contains no oil...
Some people like cast iron pumps, some like sleeved aluminum pumps.
I'm an aluminum pump fan myself. Aluminum conducts heat *much* better
than cast iron and a good iron sleeved aluminum pump will run much
cooler than it's all iron equivalant. It's the same reason most all
air-cooled engines use aluminum heads.
One thing to look at on the pump is the cooling fins. Some pumps
have nice deep, fairly closely spaced fins. These can get rid
of heat quite quickly. Others, especially some brands of cast iron
pumps, don't have much for fins, but rather just some stubby, rounded
ridges around the cylinders. Not good for cooling, and these pumps
tend to run hot as hell if used for long periods.

Brands:
Dunno. A very long time ago, I worked for a company that sold and
serviced air compressors. We dealt with quite a few brands, and the
only one that made an impression on me was Sanborn. We sold quite
a lot of Sanborn 5 and 7.5 HP compressors to auto body shops.
These compressors all used the "stubby finned" 2-cyl vertical inline
cast iron pumps. I can't even count the times that I went on service
calls for Sanborn compressors that were less than a month old and had
seized up pumps. If they got used for any serious duty, they would
overheat and seize the pistons. Even the ones that survived usually
had all the paint burned off the cylinders after a few months.
I hated those things. We eventually dropped our Sanborn distributorship
because the warranty work was killing us...
That was almost 15 years ago, and for all I know newer Sanborn pumps
might be different, but in the mid 80's they were junk.
I always thought that Ingersol-Rand and Atlas-Copco made some of the
best compressors available, but the prices are pretty steep.
Campbell-Hausfeld made pretty good stuff. Some people like Craftsman
and some hate it. I dunno about the newer ones, but my 1980 vintage
Craftsman has been reliable beyond all reproach, and I've used
it incredibly hard over the last 19 years.
There's a lot of brands of compressors, but most of them share
a few pumps that are made by other people. Can't tell you what's
best, but one of the big "features" I always look for in a pump
is *lots* of fin surface area on the cylinders for cooling.
Keeping the pump at reasonable temps is one of the keys to good
long life.

Hotrodding:
O.K, you've done mods to make that FE, 460, or 300/6 engine make
a little more power... have you done your compressor yet? (-:
If you've got compressor already and wish it made a little more
CFM, there are a few things that can sometimes be done to help.
The easiest is to install a bigger motor and change the pulley
ratio to spin the pump faster. As long as you don't exceed the
max RPM of the pump, you're good to go. Some of the Craftsman
compressors shared the same pump for 2-4 hp models. They just used
a bigger motor and spun the pump faster on the higher HP models...
Porting:
The air inlet and outlet passages in a lot of pumps are very
restrictive. I spent some time with the dremel tool on the head
of my compressor and cleaned and opened up the passages quite
a bit. This reduced my 90psi to 125psi recovery time by about 8%.
That's not a lot, but it's still a worthwhile improvement.
Inlet tuning:
This is one I haven't tried yet, but someone on another list was
talking about successful inlet tuning on air compressors.
Since electric compressors run at a fairly constant RPM, it's a simple
matter to calculate a length and diameter of tubing to add to the
inlet of the compressor to make the inlet tract resonant at the
operating speed. This can increase volumetric efficiency by helping
stuff more air into the cylinder, just like inlet tuning can do
on an engine. I may give this a try some day and take some measurements
to see how much it helps. The theory sounds good...

Anyway, I think I've been rambling too long now.
Good luck on your compressor search...

Steve
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://www.sonic.net/~sdelanty

== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 17:20:30 -0700
From: Andrew Antipas
Subject: FTE 61-79 - Colorado Parts

Jeff, I'm looking for a truck bed as well as a few other parts and I'm
in Carbondale, CO. email me directly at aantipas sopris.net. Thanks

Andy
Carbondale, CO

== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 17:22:45 -0800 (PST)
From: canzus seanet.com
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - Water heated 4v carb spacer

At 07:54 PM 29:11:99 -0600, Brett L Habben wrote:
>Folks,
>Is there such thing as a water heated 4v carb spacer as discussed last
>month pertaining to fuel economy? I dug through a pile of manifolds at
>the junk yard and found a couple of Ford water heated 2v carb spacers,
>but no 4v versions.
>Has anybody ever seen one? What applications?
>Thanks,

Yeah, the 63 Mercury 390 had a heated 4V spacer...


Steve & the Rockette
68 F100, 390cid, FMX
63 F100, 292cid, 3speed
72 Capri 2000, hers
73 Capri 2600,tube frame going in.....
73 MGB GT, Our Toy
94 SHO, SWMBO's
98 Contour SVT, Mine, Mine, All Mine....

== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 17:22:47 -0800 (PST)
From: canzus seanet.com
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - Tetraethyl Lead

At 03:51 AM 30:11:99 -0800, Daniel DiMartino wrote:
>burt
>so do todays gas with non lead gas additives that can be bought
>from an auto parts store give the same performance (octaine
>boost) and added lubrication the good old leaded gases gave? i
>would assume careful mixing is the key in any application.

A number of years ago, I built a 9:1 Turboed 2L for the Rocks
Capri, I used to mix avgas(4 grams per gallon) and super no lead,
2 gallons av to 8 gallons no lead, never pinged, even at 12lbs boost,
spent way too much money on that motor....


Steve & the Rockette
68 F100, 390cid, FMX
63 F100, 292cid, 3speed
72 Capri 2000, hers
73 Capri 2600,tube frame going in.....
73 MGB GT, Our Toy
94 SHO, SWMBO's
98 Contour SVT, Mine, Mine, All Mine....

== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 17:23:02 -0800 (PST)
From: canzus seanet.com
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - Was Electric Fuel Pump/now insurance disclaimer

At 12:29 PM 30:11:99 EST, TBeeee aol.com wrote:
>In a message dated 11/30/99 12:21:45 PM Eastern Standard Time,
>gpeters3 visteon.com writes:
>
>> As to the "Law", check with your insurance agent. I believe you will find
>> out, as I did, that they will not insure a vehicle which has an electric
>> pump installed unless it has an "approved" safety shut off switch.


>Start asking your agent questions like this and you are likely to get a
>"no"...anything that impacts on safety will likely lead to a disclaimer.
>Performance and suspension modifications are the kinds of work they do not
>like to hear about. This is always an out that the insurance company can
>rely on in denying coverage.


We are VERY lucky to live in North America, you should check out the
rules and regs for modifying a car or truck in England. From the little
I've heard from one of the other lists, I don't wanna live there......

Steve & the Rockette
68 F100, 390cid, FMX
63 F100, 292cid, 3speed
72 Capri 2000, hers
73 Capri 2600,tube frame going in.....
73 MGB GT, Our Toy
94 SHO, SWMBO's
98 Contour SVT, Mine, Mine, All Mine....

== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 17:33:18 -0800
From: "Bill Deacon"
Subject: FTE 61-79 - Re: Mo info--FE 352 HELP!

Whoops! I know it's supposed to be genius---call me Einstien!
- ----- Original Message -----
From: Bill Deacon
To:
Sent: Tuesday, November 30, 1999 3:21 PM
Subject: Mo info--FE 352 HELP!


> Hello everyone---My name is Bill and I live in Garden Grove, Ca.(near
> Disneyland).I am one of those guys that have been on the list for a couple
> of years and seldom post anything. I've learned a great deal(Gary, you're
a
> genious). >

== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 17:55:49 -0800 (PST)
From: canzus seanet.com
Subject: RE: FTE 61-79 - Apprenticeship

Apprenticeship? whats that?

It all started 30 years ago, I was given a go cart that didn't, Dad was
very unhelpful, but let me use his tools. A week and $8.00 later I had a
go cart that did. But I wasn't allowed to drive it. Then my older bro got
a scooter given to him, it didn't run either, $3.00 later it did, and he got
to ride it, then then lawnmower grenaded, I put a new motor on it, it
ran for 23 years. My first car, '70 Mavrick, put a 302 in it, blew the 7.5"
rear end, put a 9" in it and blew the motor, put a 351W in it and got run
off the road by an asleep-at-the-wheel. Bought my first F100, 240cid
3speed, cancer took her 2 years later(Massachusetts), failed the safety
inspection.....
Then there was a period of stupidity, 64 Che^y 2 transplanted a 327 4 speed
into it and sold it to buy a 69 Dart 340 4 speed, traded for a 67 Impala
396 PG,
sold to buy a 68 Firechicken 400 4 speed, sold to buy a 73 Capri 2.6L 4 speed,
a 73 MGB GT, that I've stuck a 75 2.8L into, the wifes 72 Capri 2L Turbo, C4
and
a 57 F100 289, 4 speed, which was stolen and wrecked, shortly after buying
the 63 F100.
Then came a 84 Blazer, stuck a 350 in it and traded it for an
HTG 78 Camaro Z28, with AC delete, Radio delete, which got run off the
road by a drunk driver, then got a 86 Olds Gutless Calais ( responsible
adult type car) which was traded in for SWMBO's a 94 SHO.
Then I bought myself a 97 Contour, that I just traded in for a 98 Contour SVT,
and last but not least a 68 F100 390 FMX....
At the present time I repair, "fork lifts" which is a misnomer for the
type, as they
are really called stock pickers, conveyor systems, electrical systems, plumbing
systems, HVAC systems, and building maintenance, generators(480V 3 phase)
fire control systems, and burgular systems too. I do all this "work" in a
250,000SF
distribution center in Preston Wa. Most of what I've learned is by using a
little
(LOTS OF) common sense, and a manual or two.....

Steve & the Rockette
68 F100, 390cid, FMX
63 F100, 292cid, 3speed
72 Capri 2000, hers
73 Capri 2600,tube frame going in.....
73 MGB GT, Our Toy
94 SHO, SWMBO's
98 Contour SVT, Mine, Mine, All Mine....

== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 17:55:48 -0800
From: "S.Harkema"
Subject: FTE 61-79 - FE/Fuel pump

>The FE has some serious good qualities

You better get that fever checked Gary:)

>Neither pump is supposed to put out more than 7# but together they may
>exceed that. The beauty of this system is that you turn on the >electric before starting the engine untill you hear it "fill up" and >then you hit the starter for perfect starts every time :-) If you run >out of gas you have a perfect primer for the mechanical pump as well :-)

Maybe you are not feverish after all:)
That is exactly how I use my electric pump.I also use it when one of my
fuel tanks run dry(the one without a gauge)and I switch tanks.
The only time I would run the elec.continuusly if if the mech.pump
failed so over pressure would not be a problem any way.
I better round up a inertia switch on my next trip to the bone yard
tho..
== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 20:12:27 -0600
From: jcarbone
Subject: FTE 61-79 - looking for power windows - '78 F100

I am looking for power windows for my '78 F100. I want the kind that fit
totally within the door and not use the present window crank shaft as
the drive. I want to have flush door panels without a protrusion at the
present crank location.

Any vendor suggestions?

Thanks all !!!!

== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 23:06:13 -0500
From: Ken Payne
Subject: FTE 61-79 - Pump Blocking plate 390 FE

Forwarded for: "JOHN B. HELLDORFER"

Sorry if this is a second post. I s*bscribe and read them daily...

Hope this helps.. I copied the flange on the pump, (gasket will do).
went down to the auto store and it matched up to a Chevy ( :( ) block-off
plate. Fit just fine...

http://www.ford-trucks.com/pictorial/big/1972_f250_2.html


.
__JOHN__տ
ICQ#6030753



== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 20:16:29 PST
From: "Don Jones"
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - Tetraethyl Lead

>>
>>2 gallons av to 8 gallons no lead, never pinged, even at 12lbs boost,
>>spent way too much money on that motor....

The price of gas here is going skyward. 69 a litre for regular and 79 for
premium. I usually run premium, but at over $50 a fill i need to start
looking for ways to economize.
My first thought is to just burn regular, but it knocks and pings very badly
even under a moderate load
Second idea is to retard the timing a bit and run regular. But that would
probably hurt gas mileage and i would be no further ahead.
The truck is in good tune, new points, plugs, wires and gets about 11 mpg
(360, t-18, 4.11's 17"tires)


I spotted a mid 60's merc 4x4 behind a garage today. i think its an M-250
with an 8 foot stepside bed.



Don Jones
1970 f-250 4x4 ~Fordzilla~



______________________________________________________
== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 21:18:46 -0800
From: J&D Marketing
Subject: FTE 61-79 - Zero Oil Pressure

Can anyone give me an idea why a seemingly healthy motor would suddenly
lose oil pressure? When it first happened I took off the pressure sensor
switch and turned the engine over with the starter. It shot a fairly strong
stream of oil out of the hole. I cleaned the pressure switch up and
re-installed it. When I started it back up it had a good oil pressure
reading again so I just thought that maybe the end of the sensor was
plugged or something. Then when I got in it and drove for about 20 minutes
I lost oil pressure again. It's parked until I know for sure whats going on.
Thanks,
John
'68 F-100 4x4 429 4-speed
PrimeBuyNetwork.com
Get Your Own Piece of the Internet
Free Stock for Founding Members
http://www.ford-trucks.com//lc/lc.php?action=do&link=http://primebuynetwork.com/shop-at-home






== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 00:21:01 EST
From: SHill48337 aol.com
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - Tetraethyl Lead

In a message dated 11/30/99 6:52:46 AM Eastern Standard Time,
grunon yahoo.com writes:


so do todays gas with non lead gas additives that can be bought
from an auto parts store give the same performance (octaine
boost) and added lubrication the good old leaded gases gave? i
would assume careful mixing is the key in any application.
>>
Unfortunately I have read that most octane additives do not raise the octane
as much as they would like you to believe. And even fewer provide the same
kind of lubrication for the valve seats that leaded gas did. It is probably
a good idea, as someone on this list mentioned, to get hardened seats and
avoid the lead issue all together. Use octane boosters as needed to prevent
knocking. I researched how to produce the lead additives for my own use.
But, discovered that they were deadly in the concentrated form. The DOT does
not allow transportation of these things either. The refineries produced the
lead on site.
Burt Hill Kennewick WA 1972 F-250 4x4 460
== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 00:55:29 EST
From: SHill48337 aol.com
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - Zero Oil Pressure

In a message dated 12/1/99 12:22:47 AM Eastern Standard Time, jdm cdsnet.net
writes:


lose oil pressure? When it first happened I took off the pressure sensor
switch and turned the engine over with the starter. It shot a fairly strong
stream of oil out of the hole. I cleaned the pressure switch up and
re-installed it. When I started it back up it had a good oil pressure
reading again so I just thought that maybe the end of the sensor was
plugged or something. Then when I got in it and drove for about 20 minutes
I lost oil pressure again. It's parked until I know for sure whats going on.
Thanks,
John >>

It is just my opinion, but it sounds to me like you need a new oil pressure
sender.
Burt Hill Kennewick, WA 1972 F-250 4x4 460
== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 01:05:00 EST
From: Spike188 aol.com
Subject: FTE 61-79 - Brake problem

Speaking of losing brake fluid, I'm seeing some brake fluid on the front
floorboard, draining down to the area under the gas pedal. I assume this is
coming through the seal at the firewall. Can this boot be replaced separate
or do I need the whole master cylinder?
Thanks for the help.

Spike188 aol.com
1967 F100 swb
== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 01:32:49 EST
From: SevnD2 aol.com
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - FE Electric Fuel Pump?

In a message dated 11/30/1999 9:08:15 AM Eastern Standard Time,
wish iastate.edu writes:


I dunno about the oil pressure switch being a law, but it is a good idea at
any rate ... the impact switches that the new cars have aren't that hard to
wire up (usually just 2 wires and a plunger) and are easily reset ... I
would lean towards this to avoid things like starting after an oil change or
faulty oil pressure switches ...
>>

I have used an electric fuel pump before . This is what I did to have fuel
pressure while cranking the engine and having no oil pressure . I ran a wire
from the starter solenoid ( trigger voltage wire ) to the electric pump .
What this does is give power to the fuel pump while cranking the engine . I
am pretty sure that the fuel pump I purchased had two positive wires and then
a ground . I would say any electric pump would have some sort of setup
similar to this . If not then just use a diode for the wire running from the
solenoid to the pump That will prevent any voltage going back to the
solenoid and activating the starter accidently .
Hope this helps . :-)
Rollie .
== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 02:17:52 EST
From: SevnD2 aol.com
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - FE Electric Fuel Pump?

I forgot to add that the oil pressure switches have the accomodation for a
wire from the starter solenoid ( trigger voltage ) . That when the circuit is
completed ( no oil pressure ) . You have fuel pressure while cranking . When
the engine is running and the oil pressure is up , the switch completes the
other circuit for normal running and simultaneously disconnects the solenoid
circuit . This is also good for the person who would try to keep driving
without oil pressure . Anyone second that ? :-)
Hope this helps .
Rollie .
== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 02:28:37 EST
From: SevnD2 aol.com
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - Brake problem

In a message dated 12/01/1999 1:09:20 AM Eastern Standard Time,
Spike188 aol.com writes:


floorboard, draining down to the area under the gas pedal. I assume this is
coming through the seal at the firewall. Can this boot be replaced separate
or do I need the whole master cylinder?
Thanks for the help.
>>
A master cylinder replacement is in order ! BTDT
== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999 03:07:32 -0500
From: "George W. Selby, III"
Subject: FTE 61-79 - RE: Compressors

I have a 5hp Craftsman oilless, 25 gal, that I have had since about 1994,
and it has run continuously for the past 3 years. That's right, I never
switch it off. It even was flooded in Hurricane Floyd, and flipped over
while plugged in and running and was underwater. I retrieved it, flipped
it over, pulled the drain plug and let it run for a couple of minutes to
get the water out, and it has been running since. So my longevity
estimation is good.

Now as to size. This is the largest capacity unit that you can plug into
110V and a 20A breaker. This is important to me, as sometimes I use the
compressor at locations other than my house (OK, so I do turn it off to
transport it, but that is less than an hour usually, then I plug it in as
soon as I arrive as destination.) Also, it is the largest tank and
compressor I can pick up and put in the bed of my truck by myself with no
ramp. Now, sometimes it does run out of air, but not usually during impact
wrench use (the rest between bolts is usually long enough for it to
recharge). It is mainly during cutting wheel use, but the compressor
breaks usually coincide with when my hands need a break for a sec. I don't
sandblast, so that's not a problem, and my painter friend has used it to
paint several fenders and the like, so I know it works OK for that. The
longest I have to wait for it is when it is right when the pressure drops
to about 85 lbs, right before it cuts itself back on, and I have a bolt
that needs the full 120 lbs to provide enough torque. Then you have to run
the wrench long enough to engage the compressor, then wait for it to fully
charge. But all in all I would say I wait for my air compressor (probably
less than 30 mins a month) far less in my life than i wait for my computer,
or traffic lights even, so I can live with it. And I use it every day.

George Selby
78 F-150 400M, 4 on floor, 4x4
86 Nissan 300ZX
82 Jeep Cherokee
85 Dodge W-100
digiman ibox.net

== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999 23:19:01 -0800
From: Pat Brown
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - Brake problem

Spike188 aol.com wrote:
>
> Speaking of losing brake fluid, I'm seeing some brake fluid on the front
> floorboard, draining down to the area under the gas pedal. I assume this is
> coming through the seal at the firewall. Can this boot be replaced separate
> or do I need the whole master cylinder?

You can replace the boot, but it won't fix the problem. Rebuild
or replace the master cylinder, there shouldn't be any fluid
leaking from the end.
- --
Pat Brown
Sebastopol, California


== FTE: Uns*bscribe and posting info http://www.ford-trucks.com/faq.html

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 01 Dec 1999 00:40:00 -0800
From: Pat Brown
Subject: Re: FTE 61-79 - A LIL MO' INFO.........

Hi All,

Well, I enjoyed reading all the bios, you all have been quite
prolific while I've been too busy to catch up - but I managed
to sneak a few posts in here and there. I think Beyer would
win for the most 'colorful' :-) OK, here goes my better late
than never . . .

Let's see, umm, 45 (always have to count now-a-days), married
for 23+ years, daughter 20, son 18 (have to post a picture for
Lisa, he drives an '87 baby Bronco :-). I'm an electronic
design engineer for Agilent Technologies, which was up until
recently known as Hewlett-Packard. Sorry, i can't help with
your computer or printer problems, but if you have a question
about spectrum or network analyzers, I'll be happy to assist :-).

I'm a Navy brat (transplanted Michigan parents), born in San Diego,
pretty much lived in CA all my life except a couple of years at
Great Lakes. My family settled in Cupertino (50 miles south of San
Francisco) after dad left the Navy, about 1961. Not quite twenty
years later, Kathy (SWMBO) and I moved to Sebastopol, which is
about 50 miles north of San Francisco, in Sonoma County (Think
Wine Country, about 20 miles south of Steve Delanty). Here,
we raised our family, and still live in same (substantialy
modified) house we moved to in 1979. My many hobbies include
playing with cars / woodwork / home repair / trains (model
and full sized) and I am a full-time computer weenie around
my house with more computers than cars around here (Windows
SUCKS!).

I've been an FTE member for over two years, I subscribe to _3_
lists to cover all my trucks, but am active only on this list.

My first was a '68 F-100 Ranger, 390/C6, loaded. My dad bought
this truck in 1969 with about 10k on it. It eventually came to
me through my brother with 140k miles. I had done most of the
work on the truck while dad owned it, including a valve job
at about 20k (burned exhaust valve, probably bad from factory),
and a water pump/timing chain around 100k. I repaired a lot of
small stuff, rebuilt the front end, fixed all the sheet metal,
and painted it in its original two-tone blue/white. It looked/
ran great, but was not real good at carrying a cab-over around
northern california, and the kids were getting big so . . .

I started looking a Super Cab F-250. Long before FTE of course,
so I had no idea SC's weren't produced until the mid 70s. But,
there in the paper, a 1970 F250 "Super Cab". So I call, and run
over to check it out. "Yuk!" I said as I drove by, "that's not
a Super Cab, That's a Crew Cab. And, it's Uhhggg-lyy!". Over the
next week or so, it grew on me. Would be kind of nice, for the
kids and all. I went back and bought it, but of course by then
it was "unique" and "utilitarian". Well, it worked great. That
was twelve years ago, and a lot of memories ride in that truck.

About the same time, I bought an '88 Aerostar (yeah Deacon,....


To access the rest of this feature you must be a logged in Registered User Of Ford Truck Enthusiasts

Registration is free, easy and gives you access to more features.
If you are not registered, click here to register.
If you are already registered, you can login here.

If you are already logged in and are seeing this message, your web browser is blocking session cookies. Change your browser cookie settings to allow session cookies.




Advertising - Terms of Use - Privacy Policy - Jobs

This forum is owned and operated by Internet Brands, Inc., a Delaware corporation. It is not authorized or endorsed by the Ford Motor Company and is not affiliated with the Ford Motor Company or its related companies in any way. Ford is a registered trademark of the Ford Motor Company.